When asked about quarterback Tom Brady appealing his Deflategate suspension Monday night at Rob Ninkovich’s ping pong charity event at Blazing Paddles outside Fenway Park, Rob Gronkowski gave a typical Rob Gronkowski answer.

NECN’s Kathryn Sotnik approached Gronkowski as he walked into the event and asked what his thoughts were on Brady appealing his suspension.

When asked about quarterback Tom Brady appealing his Deflategate suspension Monday night at Rob Ninkovich’s ping pong charity event at Blazing Paddles outside Fenway Park, Rob Gronkowski gave a typical Rob Gronkowski answer.

NECN’s Kathryn Sotnik approached Gronkowski as he walked into the event and asked what his thoughts were on Brady appealing his suspension.

“He’s sexy,” Gronkowski replied.

Inside at the event, Ninkovich took a different approach when asked about the saga.

“What’s that? I don’t even know. I’m just here having fun with my teammates,” he said.

Below is video of Sotnik’s interaction with Gronkowski (fast forward to :50 mark).

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Both the NFLPA and Tom Brady’s legal team have issued statements in the wake of their filing a petition for a rehearing of his suspension case against the NFL before the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York.

NFL Players Association Executive Director DeMaurice Smith: “This Union has always stood for protecting the rights of our members. Our filing of this appeal today on behalf of Tom Brady and all NFL players is no different. He was not afforded fundamental fairness and due process as guaranteed by the collective bargaining agreement and case law. We also know that the NFL propped up a now completely de-bunked ‘independent’ report with a made-up standard as the basis for his suspension. For sixty years we have affirmed the right to seek redress for our members and we will always hold the NFL accountable.”

Former US Solicitor General and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher Partner Theodore Olson: “The divided panel of the Second Circuit reached erroneous legal conclusions under an unfair and unjust standard. The decision and the standards it imposes are damaging and unfair — not only to Tom Brady — but to all parties to collective bargaining agreements everywhere. Commissioner Goodell cannot sit as an appellate arbitrator and then affirm the league’s initial disciplinary decision based upon a new theory and imagined evidence and pretend to be an unbiased decision-maker.” 

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Tom Brady’s legal team officially filed their petition late Monday afternoon for a rehearing of his suspension case against the NFL before the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York.

Tom Brady and his legal team filed its appeal Monday afternoon. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Tom Brady and his legal team filed its appeal Monday afternoon. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Tom Brady’s legal team officially filed their petition late Monday afternoon for a rehearing of his suspension case against the NFL before the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York.

Brady’s attorneys, including former U.S. Solicitor General Ted Olson, have petitioned for a rehearing “en banc,” which is fundamentally a request for all of the active judges on the second circuit to rehear the case.

There is no timeline for the court to decide whether or not it will rehear the case — according to many legal experts, the decision usually takes somewhere in the neighborhood of one month.

If the court accepts the petition, there would be a stay of Brady’s four-game suspension until the new ruling, and he’d be eligible to play.

If the court chooses not to rehear the case, Brady could petition the U.S. Supreme Court and ask for a stay of the second circuit decision. If the second circuit doesn’t grant a stay, Brady and his lawyers can ask for a stay of the decision from the Supreme Court.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

NFLPA chief De Maurice Smith was on “The Dan Patrick Show” Monday, and had some harsh words for Roger Goodell and his handling of Deflategate.

First, he was asked about Goodell’s ability to be a neutral arbitrator:

He also touched on what he called the intellectual hypocrisy and the “general awareness” claim from the league.

And he also commented on a settlement offer that was made by Tom Brady.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

In the latest It Is What It Is podcast, Chris Price talks with Comcast’s Phil Perry about the latest Deflategate news, what’s next for Tom Brady and what chance he might have when it comes to playing in the opener. The two also take a look at some guys on the roster bubble and which rookies have the best chance of having an impact in 2016 and beyond.

Blog Author: 
WEEI

On the day the NFLPA and Tom Brady will once again appeal the quarterback’s four-game suspension, the NFLPA continues

NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith continued to blast Roger Goodell. (Kirby Lee/USA Today Sports)

NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith continued to blast Roger Goodell. (Kirby Lee/USA Today Sports)

On the day the NFLPA and Tom Brady will once again appeal the quarterback’s four-game suspension, the NFLPA continues to attack commissioner Roger Goodell and the case.

Appearing on The Dan Patrick Show, NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith blasted Goodell and said the NFLPA would do the same for any player, not just Brady.

“You know on this side that it is never just about the player,” Smith said. “Every player is going to be subject to a rule where a commissioner is upholding discipline based on his belief that a player was generally aware of someone else’s conduct.

“Have you ever heard of anything like that before? It’s unbelievable. It borders on intellectual hypocrisy. It’s Tom Brady today, but if your employer wanted to fire you and you ask why and the employer said I believe you were generally aware of somebody else’s conduct, you wouldn’t say that is a Tom Brady issue, you would say that is a player issue.”

Smith once again laid out the case against Goodell and the league, saying the commissioner acted unfair.

“Basically the argument is that the collective bargaining agreement and Roger’s decision to cloak himself as the arbitrator meant that he also cloaked himself in case law that means he must follow industrial due process,” Smith said. “At its core, it means once the commissioner decided to be the arbitrator, it also means an arbitrator can’t simply go rogue. And in this case, he heard evidence based on discipline that he based on facts and then after the hearing decided to base the discipline on why. We believe when he chose to the the arbitrator in this case, which is different than choosing to be the disciplinarian, when he chose to be the neutral arbitrator, when he chose to cloak himself neutrality, that also means he cannot choose then to be unfair.”

Added Smith: “In this case it was an abuse when he chose to be the arbitrator and then chose to be an unfair arbitrator. Look at it this way: If an employer decides to impose punishment, an employer has a wide range of options to punish employees. When that employer also says in this case I am going to choose to review that punishment and I am going to step into the role of neutral arbitrator that also means you have to be neutral. You have to be unbiased. You have to be fair. In this case, it is clear Judge Berman found ‘Roger Goodell was going to impose his own brand of industrial due process.’ When you choose to be an arbitrator, you cannot do that.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

The mutual respect between Tom Brady and Ed Reed is abundantly clear.