Oct 15, 2015; New Orleans, LA, USA; New Orleans Saints tight end Benjamin Watson (82) is tackled by Atlanta Falcons strong safety William Moore (25) during the second half of a game at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Mandatory Credit: Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports

Saints tight end Benjamin Watson (82) is tackled by Falcons strong safety William Moore (25) during a game in 2015. (Derick E. Hingle/USA Today Sports)

The Patriots continue to look to add depth to their secondary.

According to ESPN’s Adam Caplan, the team worked out Vinnie Sunsieri last week, a fifth-round pick by the Saints in 2014 out of Alabama.

The Patriots, according to Ian Rapoport of NFL Media, also recently worked out former Falcons safety William Moore.

Sunseri has a history of knee issues. In his final year at Alabama, he tore his ACL. He missed all of last season with another torn ACL. In his rookie year with the Saints, he had five tackles in nine games before being placed on injured reserve with an arm injury.

The 6-foot, 210-pound safety recorded 20 tackles with two interceptions and four passes defended in six games at Alabama in 2013. Adding to his potential value with the Patriots is the fact that he was a special teams star at Alabama.

Moore, 31, has 16 career interceptions, including two last season with the Falcons before being released. He signed a 5-year, $32 million deal to stay with the Falcons in March 2013.

The Patriots are currently at the 90-man limit on their roster, with OTAs set to begin next week. Nate Ebner is on leave from the team to try out for the U.S. Olympic rugby team. The Patriots also have Devin McCourty, Patrick Chung, Duron Harmon, Jordan Richards, Brock Vereen and Cedric Thornton on their safety depth chart.

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

In the new It Is What It Is podcast, Chris Price talks with capologist Miguel Benzan of Patscap.com about some of the biggest misconceptions about the NFL salary cap, why some media members don’t want to talk to him, the Patriots cap situation for 2016 and beyond, and the looming payday for the likes of Dont’a Hightower, Jamie Collins and Malcolm Butler.

Blog Author: 
WEEI

Tom Brady’s team added another lawyer to the mix on Thursday, as multiple reports indicate that Thomas H. Dupree has been included as part of the quarterbacks’ defense team.

Dupree is a partner at the law firm of Gibson Dunn, the same firm that employs Ted Olson, who has also been retained by Brady and the NFLPA. Jeffrey Kessler is also already working the case.

Tom Brady’s team added another lawyer to the mix on Thursday, as multiple reports indicate that Thomas H. Dupree has been included as part of the quarterbacks’ defense team.

Dupree is a partner at the law firm of Gibson Dunn, the same firm that employs Ted Olson, who has also been retained by Brady and the NFLPA. Jeffrey Kessler is also already working the case.

According to his bio, Dupree has argued more than 70 appeals in the federal courts, including in all thirteen circuits as well as the United States Supreme Court. In addition. he “he played a substantial role in the successful representation of George W. Bush before the United States Supreme Court in Bush v. Gore, and represented Time Inc. and Time’s White House reporter Matthew Cooper in connection with the investigation into the leak of the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame.”

Monday marks the deadline for Brady and his attorneys to file an official request for an en banc rehearing in the Second Circuit, one that could overturn his four-game suspension.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

FOXBORO — When it came to selling cornerback E.J. Biggers on the Patriots, it probably didn’t take a long time.

Speaking Thursday afternoon during a break in the action at Gillette Stadium, the 28-year-old veteran said he held the franchise in pretty high regard over the course of his career.

E.J. Biggers sounds excited to join the Patriots.  (Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

E.J. Biggers sounds excited to join the Patriots. (Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

FOXBORO — When it came to selling cornerback E.J. Biggers on the Patriots, it probably didn’t take a long time.

Speaking Thursday afternoon during a break in the action at Gillette Stadium, the 28-year-old veteran said he held the franchise in pretty high regard over the course of his career.

“Top of the food chain,” he said when asked about the chance to play in New England. “It’s somewhere you want to be.”

He added: “Being in the league going on (six) years now, you kind of know what to expect when you come here. It’s a job. You come in here to the best organization in football, so you have to make sure you have your ‘A’ game. You just fall in line.”

The 6-foot, 180-pound Biggers has played with the Bucs, Redskins and Eagles over the course of his NFL career, with his best year coming in 2012 with Tampa. That season, he played in 13 games with 12 starts and finished with seven passes defensed, two forced fumbles, one sack and 39 tackles.

The Patriots likely got a good look at him recently, as he was part of a Washington team that conducted joint practices with the Patriots in 2014. Asked what stood out about New England in those workouts, Biggers smiled.

“Everything they run through will be full speed,” he said. “(They’re) an A-1 group of guys. Just watching how they do things each and every day, there’s always something. When you’re not here, you kind of envy that. It’s always something you want to be a part of.

“(Now), you know you’re in an A-1 organization, and you put your cleats on and you’re ready to strap it up every single day.”

With New England, Biggers will likely provide depth at corner, either in the slot or outside. In addition, he should provide a boost on special teams. (For the record, in the Eagles’ 35-28 win over the Patriots last December in Foxboro, he had three tackles, one pass defensed and one special-teams tackle.)

But at this point on the calendar, he sounds like someone who will play wherever he’s asked.

“You see the success. You see how those guys go about things,” he added. “You get (to Foxboro), and you understand what all that was for.”

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Jets wide receiver Eric Decker told NFL Network that a potential four-game suspension for Tom Brady would put the AFC East “up for grabs.”

Decker, speaking while at the NFL’s annual broadcast bootcamp from NFL Films, believes that the rest of the division could get a boost from Brady being sidelined the first four games of the season because of Deflategate.

Jets wide receiver Eric Decker told NFL Network that a potential four-game suspension for Tom Brady would put the AFC East “up for grabs.”

Decker, speaking while at the NFL’s annual broadcast bootcamp from NFL Films, believes that the rest of the division could get a boost from Brady being sidelined the first four games of the season because of Deflategate.

“You’ve got to win your division games,” Decker said. “(But) with Brady being suspended four games, I think (that) makes the division up for grabs.”

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Tom Brady No. 5 On Sporting News’ ’40 Most Hated NFL Players Of All Time’ List https://t.co/aOd4tDO4vY #Boston #News

Kevin Faulk distinguished himself as a franchise Hall of Famer over the course of his career with the Patriots.  (Elsa/Getty Images)

Kevin Faulk distinguished himself as a franchise Hall of Famer over the course of his career with the Patriots. (Elsa/Getty Images)

1. I’m going to be honest here: I’m probably incapable of writing unemotionally about Kevin Faulk. I know that’s probably considered a violation of some sort of journalistic code, but when it comes to stuff like this, I don’t really care. I’ve covered the team since 2001, and I got the chance to know him a little when he was a player, and I had the great fortune to sit next to him as a broadcast partner for a year, and he was always good company who treated me (and whoever he was working with) with respect. So if you’re looking tor a straightforward analytical look at the newest member of the Patriots Hall of Fame, you’re probably in the wrong place. (You’re also in the wrong place if you’re looking to rehash the Bill Parcells/Patriots Hall of Fame debate. Let’s all agree to meet back here next spring to talk about that again.) What I can tell you is that Faulk is eminently deserving of this honor, and I was proud to be one of the people who backed him at the Hall of Fame committee meeting. Look up the numbers if you want here, but just know that Faulk did a little bit of everything over the course of his career: feature back, third-down back, return man, direct-snap specialist. An eminently reliable, consistent and dependable performer who went to five Super Bowls and played a role in three wins, he probably would have won the award, even if he didn’t stroll out the second night of the NFL draft with a Tom Brady jersey on. (Our poll had him leading before that night.) After that, Mike Vrabel and Raymond Clayborn didn’t stand a chance.

2. Faulk was never the face-of-the-franchise, elite-level superstar type like the quarterback. And he was never the emotional centerpiece like Tedy Bruschi or Troy Brown. Instead, he occupied a weird little in-between spot in the hearts of fans, an undersized back who manage to reboot his career on three different occasions during his time with the Patriots. One of only a few players who ultimately survived the purge when Bill Belichick took over in 2000, as his career continued, he soon became one of the most well-respected guys in the New England locker room, managing to garner the admiration of players on both sides of the football. Most of the time, offensive guys stick with offensive guys and defensive guys stick with defensive guys. Only occasionally, there comes along a guy who is able to get both sides to defer to his leadership skills. Junior Seau was like that. Vince Wilfork was like that. Faulk was like that. There was, of course, one bad decision. If he had one mulligan, I suspect he would have left the weed at home in 2008 instead of bringing it with him to the Lil’ Wayne concert. That got him banned for a game, arguably the only thing he ever did that reflected negatively on the organization. But there was more than enough good to make up for that.

3. It’s easy to forget how many big plays he was responsible for, particularly over the second half of his career. And there was no one else who was capable of executing the direct snap and coming away with something big better than Faulk. (Google “Kevin Faulk” and “direct snap” and you get more than 3,000 results.) Super Bowl XXXVIII against the Panthers. The 2006 divisional playoffs against the Chargers. In big moments, he was always able to come up with a big performance. Built to run gadget plays, he was one of only two guys to throw a pass to Tom Brady.

4. There were few people who were tapped into the mind of the quarterback better than Faulk. On one morning in 2009, I approached him in the locker room to ask him about Brady. Brady and Faulk spent more time together on the New England roster than any offensive player — they were teammates for 12 seasons. If anyone could give an additional level of insight into Brady’s psyche, it was Faulk. Earlier in the year, Faulk had pulled a struggling Brady aside and expressed some concern. “You doing all right?” Faulk asked Brady two days before a September game against the Falcons. “I’ve played with you for a long time, and there’s just something that’s a little different now.”

I asked him about the conversation, and Faulk paused for a moment and smiled. He looked down to the other end of the locker room at the sizable crowd around Brady. He told me: “When you’re around someone for such a long period of time, you tend to take notice — you want to know. You’re concerned about it because you’ve been around him for so long. You’ve been friends for so long. You’re more than teammates in this locker room.”

(Just spitballing here, but if the quarterback ends up having to sit for the first four games of the regular season, the one thing that will grate at him as much as the suspension itself is the fact that he won’t be able to be at Gillette when Faulk is honored at halftime of the regular-season opener. The two had a bromance long before Julian Edelman came along, one that does far beyond Faulk’s now-famous decision to wear Brady’s jersey at the draft. While Brady will find some way to make sure Faulk is honored, from this perspective, it’ll be tough for him not to be able to be there the day his “brother from another mother” is honored at halftime.)

5. Faulk got respect because he gave respect. He was one of the well-established veterans in the New England locker room who had permission to speak freely with the media. Of course, Faulk was on the program, but when the cameras were turned off and the pads and pens were put away, you could approach him and ask him a specific question during the week, and he’d give you a thoughtful, substantive answer that made you a better reporter: What did I see out there? What were you guys trying to do? Where did the execution break down? He would never give away state secrets, but Faulk (along with the likes of Rodney Harrison and Richard Seymour) would be open to chatting with a reporter who was simply looking to understand more about the game.

Ultimately, that respect was a two-way street. The most notable time came in the wake of 4th and 2 against the Colts. After Faulk came up short of the sticks that night in Indy, the media (naturally) rushed to his locker after the game looking for answers. Sitting at his locker, still in full pads, Faulk had his head down. After a few moments, he looked up at us and asked us for a minute to collect his thoughts. On deadline, we acquiesced. After a few moments, he provided us with everything we needed. He was forthright, direct and accountable after a brutal, gut-punch of a loss. It was one of many reasons why it was a pleasure to cover him for a sizable portion of his playing career, and why it was an honor to support him as a Hall of Fame candidate.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price