Ed Reed loved facing Tom Brady and the Patriots (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

Ed Reed loved facing Tom Brady and the Patriots. (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

The mutual respect between Tom Brady and Ed Reed is abundantly clear.

Over the years Brady has raved about how good Reed was with the Ravens, especially in the NFL Network’s A Football Life with Bill Belichick when Brady and Belichick broke down film watching Reed play and Brady noted you always have to know where Reed is on the field — more so than any other opponent.

Reed talked about facing Brady and the Patriots in an interview with Talk of Fame Network.

“Those games were awesome,” Reed said. “You knew you were going against the best. You knew the outcome could be either way. You knew it was going to be a close game for the most part. You can only control so much, but those are the best games because you’re going against the best. Who didn’t want to play against the best players at the time – especially at the quarterback position. With myself being the safety and Brady being the quarterback … I loved that matchup any day. It’s just that those guys are so good you had to be on point, you had to mind your p’s and q’s all the time.

“And I had so much respect for them as an organization and team … as coaches and players for what they stood for and what they accomplished. That’s what you wanted to go against.”

Reed, now an assistant coach with the Bills, was 3-5 against Brady and the Patriots, including the playoffs. Those wins didn’t come easy as five of the games were decided by six points or less.

“There’s a reason why we talk about him being one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time,” Reed said. “Because of the matchups and what he did against us and how he won. We might’ve done some great things, but he moved the football … It was always a physical game and mental matchup going against the man. You’ve got to like that.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Now that it’s learned Tom Brady and the NFLPA will file its appeal Monday afternoon, the biggest question is what is next?

The Tom Brady appeal decision will take roughly a month. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Today Sports)

The Tom Brady appeal decision will take roughly a month. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Today Sports)

Now that it’s learned Tom Brady and the NFLPA will file its appeal Monday afternoon, the biggest question is what is next?

Speaking on SportsCenter Monday morning, ESPN business analyst Andrew Brandt said it should be roughly a month before a decision is reached.

“If they accept the appeal, then we’re in for months more of arguments and rehearing and that whole thing,” Brandt said. “If they deny it, the suspension is back on hold. I am projecting about a month before they even decide if they are going to take the case or not.”

Brandt later was more specific saying it will be roughly a 3-6 week process.

As it relates specifically to whether or not the case will actually be reheard, he said it is a “long shot.”

“It is an uphill battle, it’s a long shot,” Brandt said. “Courts are very hesitant to take these cases that have been decided by three other judges. It was a 2-to-1 decision. The sliver of hope for Brady’s side is that one — that dissenting opinion was one from the Chief Judge of the Second Circuit in Judge Katzmann. They are holding on to a sliver of hope there. Really, this is running the clock. Now, the suspension is stayed again.

“We’ll see how long this takes and if they get a negative decision on this end maybe they go to the Supreme Court and try to run the clock again. I wouldn’t classify it directly as a Hail Mary, but it certainly is a long shot for Brady to get this case accepted for rehearing by the full Second Circuit.”

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Tom Brady and the NFLPA continue to argue Roger Goodell's ruling was incorrect. (Andy Marlin/USA Today Sports)

Tom Brady and the NFLPA continue to argue Roger Goodell’s ruling was incorrect. (Andy Marlin/USA Today Sports)

On Monday afternoon, Tom Brady and the NFLPA will file a petition that will request the case be reheard before the entire Second Circuit court bench.

While the official appeal will not be released until later Monday afternoon, a draft of the en banc petition has been obtained by The White Bronco.

Here are a few highlights of what Brady and his team are saying. Click here to view the entire document.

— The petition continues to say Brady’s four-game suspension is “severe and unprecedented.”

— It acknowledges Roger Goodell had the authority to hear the appeal because he’s commissioner, they say Goodell punishment was based on different grounds that weren’t the basis for his original decision.

— It says a rehearing is warranted because the panel opinion conflicts in two respects with the decisions of the Supreme Court and other courts of appeals. The first conflict relates to Goodell acting within his authority to uphold the suspension. It says “an arbitrator’s authority depends on an affirmative grant of authority by the parties not, as the panel majority held, the agreement’s ‘silence’ or an absence of express limits on the arbitrator’s power.”

It adds, “Chief Judge Katzmann had it exactly right when he explained that when the Commissioner ‘changes the factual basis for the disciplinary action after the appeal hearing concludes.'”

— Secondly, the petition brings the case back to it being an equipment violation and Goodell “completely ignored” the penalties in the CBA as it relates to equipment violations. The petition continues to question why Goodell imposed four games for such a minor violation.

— It also goes into how this case impacts more than just Brady. It states this “will harm not just NFL players, but all unionized workers who have bargained for appeal rights as a protection not as an opportunity for management to salvage a deficient disciplinary action by conjuring up new grounds for the punishment.”

— It concludes with: The panel decision stands in stark conflict with fundamental rules of labor law and undermines the rights of union members and employers alike. This Court should grant rehearing.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Ted Olson, one of several high-powered attorneys hired to represent Tom Brady, confirmed to ABC News on Monday morning that the quarterback will indeed appeal last month’s federal court ruling re-instating his four-game suspension.

“The facts here are so drastic, and so apparent, that the court should rehear it,” Olson told “Good Morning America.”

Tom Brady will continue his legal fight. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Tom Brady will continue his legal fight. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Ted Olson, one of several high-powered attorneys hired to represent Tom Brady, confirmed to ABC News on Monday morning that the quarterback will indeed appeal last month’s federal court ruling re-instating his four-game suspension.

“The facts here are so drastic, and so apparent, that the court should rehear it,” Olson told “Good Morning America.”

Olson lashed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, saying that he “completely ignored the schedule of penalties for equipment-related violations.”

Olson added: ”Our two primary arguments are that the commissioner in the first place conducted an investigation and then the commissioner imposed discipline. Then, the commissioner appointed himself as an appellate judge or an arbitrator — and then, decided something new in the appellate process, abandoning the grounds that were the original basis for the supposed discipline.

“That’s No. 1, and an appellate judge is supposed to look at the record and make a decision on the basis of what happened before. He departed from what happened before.

“Secondly, he ignored important provisions of the CBA about discipline that might be imposed for equipment violations. He departed from that completely and went off the track.”

Accordng to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, Brady’s team will petition to rehear the case “en banc,” meaning that it would be reheard before the entire 2nd Circuit court bench. Seven of the 13 judges would have to agree that an en banc session is the right decision before a hearing is held. If the en banc session isn’t granted, Brady and his legal team could take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Tom Brady’s legal team will file a petition Monday afternoon to rehear the Deflategate appeal, according to Adam Schefter of ESPN. Per Schefter, the petition will be to rehear the case “en banc,” meaning that it would be reheard before the entire 2nd Circuit court bench.

Tom Brady’s legal team will file a petition Monday afternoon to rehear the Deflategate appeal, according to Adam Schefter of ESPN. Per Schefter, the petition will be to rehear the case “en banc,” meaning that it would be reheard before the entire 2nd Circuit court bench.

Monday represented the final day for the Patriots quarterback to file an appeal to his four-game suspension, which was overturned last month.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Monday represents a major deadline in Tom Brady’s legal battle with Roger Goodell and the NFL — it’s the final day for the Patriots quarterback to file an appeal to his four-game suspension.

Monday represents a major deadline in Tom Brady’s legal battle with Roger Goodell and the NFL — it’s the final day for the Patriots quarterback to file an appeal to his four-game suspension.

A federal appeals court ruled last month that Brady must serve his suspension for his alleged role in Deflategate. Brady can ask for a hearing in front of the entire Second Circuit Court of Appeals, or he could ask for a rehearing in front of the same three-judge panel that reinstated Brady’s four-game suspension last month.

Regardless of their course of action, it seems fairly clear that Brady intends to continue fighting the suspension in some form or fashion. While he has not commented publicly since the April ruling, he has added to his already impressive legal team on multiple occasions.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price