DJ Bean and Ken Laird are live at TD Garden after the Bruins 2-0 win over Toronto on Saturday night. The guys discuss the first two-game home winning streak of the season and what it means.

[0:00:11] ... home. Any animal fight game homestand DJ glory hallelujah two game home winning streak for the Bruins Greg he's. Yeah I mean I'll be damned stayed they wanted no one but two consecutive games at home ...
[0:04:03] ... for. What a fifth round pick when you trade him right before free agency. I. Not to bail Friday here after Thanksgiving he missed rages it'll be a pretty good test. Yeah yeah I mean did ...
[0:04:44] ... b.s game this year. Search for a some iTunes or podcast up. Boston Bruins hockey or WP iPod guess not forget our roads page a big bad blow like at WB I dot com Troy your pros ...

Though the stakes weren’€™t quite as high as when they most notably did it, the Bruins scored late to defeat the Maple Leafs at TD Garden.

Though the stakes weren’€™t quite as high as when they most notably did it, the Bruins scored late to defeat the Maple Leafs at TD Garden.

With the game scoreless with under four minutes to play, Zdeno Chara took a pass from Zach Trotman, glided up to the left circle, and fired a slap shot past a screening David Krejci and Leafs goaltender James Reimer. Brad Marchand then added an empty-netter with 6.5 seconds remaining to give the B’€™s a 2-0 victory.

With the win and Thursday’€™s victory over the Wild, the Bruins now have back-to-back home wins for the first time this season. They’€™ll next head out on a two-game road trip that will begin with a contest against the very Leafs team they defeated Saturday.

Here are four more things we learned Saturday:


Tuukka Rask hasn’€™t stolen many games this season, but he made enough key saves to do it Saturday night in what proved to be a goaltending duel with James Reimer.

Most notable Rask, stopped Shawn Matthias on three of breakaways, first stoning the former Canucks forward on a break that came when Colin Miller fell down at the blue line in the first period. Matthias had another breakaway in the second against the Krug-McQuaid pairing but was again stopped by the Boston goaltender. Rask made it 3-for-3 by stopping Matthias on a partial break during a Bruins power play in the third.

The shutout was Rask’s second of the season.


The Bruins had only one penalty and one power play Saturday. Brad Marchand figured into both.

Marchand put the Leafs on the power play in the first period with a roughing penalty that came with a takedown of James van Riemsdyk. The UNH product went after Marchand due to a leg check that the B’€™s winger put on Leo Komarov, with Marchand then throwing the 6-foot-3 van Riemsdyk to the ice.

Marchand end up making up for it, as he was the victim of a Nazim Kadri high stick that put the B’€™s on the power play early in the third. Given how bad the B’€™s fared on that power play (the Leafs’€™ penalty kill had better scoring chances), it probably wasn’€™t worth it.

Speaking of Marchand…


That we can safely say the Garden crowd was the most impressed it’€™s been in a home game this season on a play in which the Bruins didn’€™t score says a lot about how the Bruins have played at home. That sentence was wordy, but the long and short of it is that Marchand nearly scored the goal of his life on a first-period rush in which absolutely embarrassed Leafs defenseman Morgan Rielly.

After winning the puck along the boards in the neutral zone, Marchand first cut in and then back out, fooling Rielly with each move. His attempt to finish on the play was stopped by Riemer.

And speaking of close calls with goals…


With the game still scoreless with under eight minutes remaining, Matt Hunwick appeared to lay out in a successful attempt to stop Jimmy Hayes from jamming the puck past Reimer. The play was reviewed, and though replays showed the play to be much closer than it seemed live, there were likely too many bodies there to actually see the puck and whether it crossed the line.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean
Max Talbot

Max Talbot

Max Talbot has found the AHL different this season from when he’d last seen it.

Ten years after being promoted to the NHL, Talbot is back to minor-league life as he goes up and down between Boston in Providence. Currently with the NHL club, Talbot said Saturday that his experience with Providence has opened his eyes to what players are in these days.

“Not only the league changed, but hockey in general changed from 10 years ago,” he said. “Guys are a little bit more professional. They come more mature when they’€™re younger. They come prepared, they’€™ve been working out for a certain number of years.

“The game is faster, the game is bigger. The younger guys, they have their legs and they forecheck. The game is similar in a way, but super different. I think it’€™s a better game than 10 years ago, like the NHL‘€™s better now than it was before.”

Talbot was 21 when he went from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins to the Pittsburgh Penguins. He recalls there being more of a split between prospects and veteran players back then than there is now, where teams might be more inclined to carry as many prospects as they can get.

“It was more of a veteran type of game,” he said. “Now it’€™s a little more younger and a development-type atmosphere.”

Talbot can only hope that his AHL days are over (again), but that’€™s not likely. Frank Vatrano is expected to begin practicing on Sunday, meaning the Bruins will again have 12 healthy forwards. The B’€™s could opt to bring Talbot on their upcoming road trip, but if Vatrano’€™s health doesn’€™t signal his return to Providence, David Pastrnak’€™s eventual health figures to.

That said, Talbot said he is not resigned to having to go up and down this season. His goal is to force his way back into the lineup for good.

“There’€™s always things you can do,” he said. “If I play the best hockey I can play and show them that they can’€™t take me out of the lineup, that’€™s what I’€™m hoping I can do. If I play like I can play, the top of my [game], you can force some hands and stay here. That’€™s the goal of any pro athlete, to give the best you can give and hope for the best.”

Talbot may not be up for long, but Claude Julien feels fortunate to still have the 31-year-old forward as an option. The fact that he’€™s both a veteran and someone with whom the team is familiar means that the team generally knows what they’€™ll get from him.

“He’€™s an experienced guy,” Julien said. “‘€¦ He comes, he competes hard. He understands what we’€™re trying to do here so it’€™s not like we’€™re trying to teach somebody. That’€™s the luxury that we have with Max being in Providence. When you bring him up you’€™re bringing a veteran player that’€™s played the game. But he’€™s not nervous about playing in this league and understands. He’€™s been with us since last year, so he understands exactly what we’€™re all about here.”

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

The Bruins recalled Max Talbot from Providence on Saturday, a move that gives them 12 healthy forwards for Saturday’€™s game with Frank Vatrano (upper-body) not expected to play.

Max Talbot

Max Talbot

The Bruins recalled Max Talbot from Providence on Saturday, a move that gives them 12 healthy forwards for Saturday’€™s game with Frank Vatrano (upper-body) not expected to play.

Talbot has been up and down between Boston and Providence this season, skating in five games at the NHL level. He has played in seven games for Providence, registering one goal and five assists for six points.

Saturday will mark Talbot’€™s second game in two days, as the 31-year-old skated in Friday’€™s P-Bruins game against Lehigh Valley.

The Bruins did not hold a morning skate on Saturday, but it would seem logical for Talbot to play on the fourth line with Zac Rinaldo and Tyler Randell.

The B’s will host the Maple Leafs Saturday night at TD Garden, marking the final game of their five-game homestand.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

Loui Eriksson leads the Bruins with nine goals in 18 games.</p>
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WILMINGTON — Frank Vatrano was absent from Friday’€™s Bruins practice after suffering an upper-body injury in Thursday’€™s win over the Wild.

Frank Vatrano

Frank Vatrano

WILMINGTON — Frank Vatrano was absent from Friday’€™s Bruins practice after appearing to injure his right arm/shoulder in Thursday’€™s win over the Wild.

The rookie left wing turned as he was about to get hit into the end boards, resulting in his shoulder/arm hitting taking the brunt of the impact from Nate Prosser’€™s hit.

With Vatrano out and the Bruins having only 20 players, defenseman Joe Morrow practiced as a left wing. Matt Beleskey moved up to take Vatrano’€™s place on David Krejci‘€™s line, while Morrow skated on a fourth line centered by Zac Rinaldo.

The Bruins could still call up a forward for Saturday’s game if Vatrano can’t play. Morrow has been a healthy scratch for the last six games.

Kevan Miller, who missed Thursday’€™s game with an upper-body injury, did not practice. The lines and pairings in practice were as follows:


Seidenberg-Colin Miller

The Bruins will host the Maple Leafs Saturday in the final game of their five-game homestand.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

In a season that’€™s featured plenty of bad, no Bruins player has been as good as Loui Eriksson. The 30-year-old provided another reminder on Thursday night.