The Bruins fell into a 3-1 series hole with a 1-0 loss in Game 4 at TD Garden. We got reaction from Patrice Bergeron, David Backes, Brad Marchand and more. Watch below. (Video courtesy Josh Dolan.)

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WEEI
Bruce Cassidy's team has made a habit of taking penalties at bad times. (Greg M. Cooper/USA Today Sports)

Bruce Cassidy’s team has made a habit of taking penalties at bad times. (Greg M. Cooper/USA Today Sports)

For the third game in a row, an untimely penalty was costly for the Bruins.

A too-many-men penalty with 4:10 remaining in the third period forced the Bruins to have to kill time while trailing 1-0, and they then struggled to set their offense in the final two minutes. The Bruins had a 13-minute stretch without a shot on goal, and finished with just 22 overall and never could get into a rhythm late.

“It was a little harder to create some [chances],” said Patrice Bergeron. “Once they got that goal they were closing us a little bit more and we have got to find ways to put pucks in deep and go back to what we’ve been doing earlier in that game.”

That call at the end of the game comes on the heels of a Riley Nash penalty in overtime during Game 3 and a Zdeno Chara delay of game call in Game 2 that led directly to Senators goals that won those contests.

In Game 4, the Bruins penalty kill was a perfect 3-for-3, but that doesn’t hide the fact that untimely penalties have been problematic.

Every game in the series has been decided by one goal, all the more reason for discipline to be at the forefront.

“Usually games are very tight,” Chara said. “Some of the games could have went our way but they didn’t and we can’t be blaming that or be frustrated, we need to keep our heads up and get ready for the next one.”

Especially on a shortened roster, where two defensemen in Charlie McAvoy and Joe Morrow saw little-to-no time all season, those man-down situations wear out the defense.

“I thought what we’ve asked our defensemen to do, I think they’ve done a pretty good job for guys that got thrown into the situation,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said. “But, part of what we talk about for our guys is to own your moments. You’re getting an opportunity, and one that you probably wanted more of during the year. So, you’re asking a lot. But, by the same token, that’s what’s in front of them.”

The first penalty of the contest was on Kevan Miller in the opening frame, and with he and Chara the only remaining blueliners who were regular penalty killers all season, that proves even more costly.

On the other end, the Bruins also haven’t been able to get calls their way.

“Our power play through the course of the year has generated offense,” said Cassidy. “We haven’t drawn enough penalties too. So, we’ve got to look at ourselves there and say, how can we get on the power play and get inside more often, force them to pull you down a little bit.”

The Bruins have a chance to extend the series to a Game 6 on Garden ice if they can win on Friday in Ottawa, but with an offense that has struggled to put the puck in the net, continuing to give away opportunities could burn them.

Blog Author: 
Marisa Ingemi

Brad Marchand continues to be snake-bitten, and no one else is really stepping up.</p>
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Battered long before the start of their first round series with the Senators, the Bruins are an injured mess. And their health situation may have gotten even worse following Game 4’s 1-0 loss.

Frank Vatrano left TD Garden wearing a walking boot. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

Bruins winger Frank Vatrano left TD Garden wearing a walking boot. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

 

Battered long before the start of their first round series with the Senators, the Bruins are an injured mess. And their health situation may have gotten even worse following Game 4’s 1-0 loss.

Following a somber locker room media session led by many of the club’s leaders, Bruins winger Frank Vatrano made his way out of the arena wearing a suit, but also sported a walking boot.

It’s hard to see exactly what could have bothered Vatrano, who finished Game 4 with one shot on goal, three hits, and a minus-1 rating in 9:59 of time on ice on a line with Ryan Spooner and Drew Stafford.

The potential loss of Vatrano, who scored 10 goals and 18 points in 44 games for the B’s this season, would simply add another hobbling body to an injury squad headlined by the club’s top four defense corps in Brandon Carlo (upper-body), Torey Krug (lower-body), and Adam McQuaid (upper-body).

The Bruins will not have practice on Thursday morning, so the earliest update will come from Bruins interim head coach Bruce Cassidy’s media availability, which will be held at 11 a.m. at Warrior Ice Arena.

The 23-year-old Vatrano has one goal, six shots, and 12 hits in four games this season.

Blog Author: 
Ty Anderson
Charlie McAvoy's first NHL was overturned on a coach's challenge. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

Charlie McAvoy’s first NHL was overturned on a coach’s challenge. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

The Bruins once again found themselves on the wrong end of a one-goal final on Wednesday, this time by a 1-0 score. It was the same score that favored the Bruins for all of a few seconds at one point, too.

At the 10:49 mark of the second period, Bruins rookie Charlie McAvoy fired a puck through traffic and beat Craig Anderson. Enough for the first goal of his NHL career (though a deeper review may have credited the goal to Noel Acciari, who appeared to get a stick on the puck), the goal jumped the Bruins out to a 1-0 edge in a game that 100 percent had the feel of a ‘first team that scores wins’ kind of contest.

But in a game where scoring was at a premium, Senators coach Guy Boucher was not going to let that goal stand without a fight.

So in came his coach’s challenge. It was there that it was determined that Acciari was offsides about 20 seconds before the goal was scored, and off came the tally.

“Yeah, it definitely sucks. When that happens you’re happy when it’s on the other side, but not when it happens to you,” Patrice Bergeron said. “It’s the rule and I guess they made the call and we still have to find a way that’s the bottom line.”

With a heavy round of boos rained down on the referees for the second game in a row, the score returned to 0-0.

And the Bruins never quite recovered.

From the non-goal on, the Bruins were outscored 1-0, and put just three more shots on goal to end the period, and opened up their third period with just two shots in the opening six minutes or so of action. After that, the Bruins went almost a full 10 minutes without a shot on goal before they were whistled for a too many men on the ice penalty, and were held to just five shots by the end of the third period, with all of the shots that followed coming with their net empty and a 6-on-4 advantage.

“It’s disappointing when those things happen. You have a tough time scoring, a low scoring game,” Bruins interim head coach Bruce Cassidy said. “But, our guys on the bench were good. They said, listen, let’s be resilient here and let’s keep pushing. So, I don’t think it was a huge factor in the game. It might have gave them a bit of a life thinking they got a break. But, for us, like I said, I don’t think it deterred us from what we wanted to do other than the obviously disappointment of losing a goal.”

But what was said on the bench versus what was done on the ice told two drastically different stories.

“We had the high tip from Noel [Acciari] – was obviously a pretty good play for us. The offsides challenge – that really has no bearing on the play – calls that back,” Bruins forward David Backes noted. “I think that for some reason made us pause rather than realize that we broke the mold there and had the recipe for success and to keep doing that.”

Officially one loss away from the summer, the B’s know their luck has to flip if this series is to return to Boston on Sunday.

“We’ll start by winning one game, and that’s all you’ve got to focus on, winning one game, and then come back home and win another one, and then it’s Game 7,” Bruins netminder Tuukka Rask said after the loss. “So, we don’t have to make it any more complicated than it is, but we’ve just got to make sure that we play a heck of a game on Friday.”

Staying onside may help, too.

Blog Author: 
Ty Anderson

The Bruins couldn’t do anything offensively Wednesday night and fell into a 3-1 series hole with a 1-0 loss to the Senators. WEEI’s Ty Anderson, Scott McLaughlin and Josh Dolan reacted on Facebook Live after the game. Watch it below.

Blog Author: 
WEEI

At one point in the second period of Wednesday’s Game 4 between the Bruins and Senators, a rogue beachball landed on the ice during play. If this were either Game 2 or Game 3, there’s a good chance that the beachball would have gone through one of the goalies in this game.

Tuukka Rask and Craig Anderson returned to form in Game 4. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

Tuukka Rask and Craig Anderson returned to form in Game 4. (Bob DeChiara/USA Today Sports)

At one point in the second period of Wednesday’s Game 4 between the Bruins and Senators, a rogue beachball landed on the ice during play. If this were either Game 2 or Game 3, there’s a good chance that the beachball would have gone through one of the goalies in this game.

But not on Wednesday, as Bruins netminder Tuukka Rask and Sens goaltender Craig Anderson both brought their best back to the rink.

Both Rask and Anderson were incredible in the opening game, which ended as a 2-1 final for the Black and Gold, but have since seen their play dip in what was back-to-back seven-goal contests, both of which have been 4-3 overtime finals in favor of the Senators. As a result of those games, Rask came into tonight’s game with nine goals allowed and an .898 save percentage for the series while Anderson had eight goals allowed and an .892 save percentage. Both goalies are much better than that, and they showed that in a 1-0 duel of a Game 4.

In what was a 26-shot opening period of play, with 14 shots for the Sens and 12 for the Bruins, Anderson stepped up the plate first with an opening game stop on a Brad Marchand breakaway. Rask, however, matched that when he flashed his glove and stoned Erik Karlsson on a ridiculous breakaway opportunity. Anderson came up with one last stop on Marchand, however, this time flying out of his crease to chip Marchand’s partial breakaway bid out of danger, and the teams skated to a 0-0 draw through 20.

The second period brought little from both sides — even with a few power plays between the teams — and for the first time in this series, neither the B’s or Sens came through with a middle frame goal, and on the teams marched to a 0-0 stalemate.

But not before the Bruins had another goal disallowed, as a successful coach’s challenge from Sens bench boss Guy Boucher determined that Noel Acciari was offside 20 seconds before Charlie McAvoy scored what would have been his first career goal.

As the pace and desperation returned in the middle frame, it was Rask that made the first big stop of the period, as he kicked his skate out just far enough to stop Derick Brassard on a drive towards the side of his net. But when chaos returned to the B’s crease just moments later, and as Bobby Ryan gained inside positioning on McAvoy, it was the Senators that struck first for the third time in four games thus far, with Ryan’s puck trickling in just above a sprawled Rask and outstretched Zdeno Chara.

Rask put his hands to his face as he laid on his belly outside his crease. As if he knew that it would be all the Senators needed.

He wasn’t wrong.

The Bruins countered Ryan’s goal with over 10 minutes of five-on-five play without a shot on goal before they were whistled for a too many men penalty. They killed it, with the help of one great Rask save on Kyle Turris, and it was Rask to the bench.

With the extra attacker and two offensive zone faceoffs, the Bruins had their chances, including the best from Marchand, but Anderson once again came up for another stop, his 21st of the night, and added another for a 22-save shutout.

Now down in the series 3-1, the Bruins will look to stave off elimination on Friday night in Ottawa.

Blog Author: 
Ty Anderson

To the surprise of absolutely no one, Bruins center Patrice Bergeron is once again a finalist for the Selke Trophy, which is given to the top defensive forward in the NHL. The other finalists are Anaheim Ducks center Ryan Kesler and Minnesota Wild center Mikko Koivu.