Gary Tanguay joins Gerry and Kirk to discuss the Wednesday night primetime events: the Drew Pomeranz debut for the Red Sox, Ted Cruz at the RNC, and Tanguay falling asleep live on Comcast

YouTubeA tennis star with a HUGE backhand directed at Taylor Swift — says she’s sick of the singer always portraying herself as the victim … just like she’s doing in the Kanye West feud.

The tennis star is 22-year-old Eugenie Bouchard — who’s a huge pop culture fan — and was asked about the Taylor vs. Kanye situation. …

“I feel like sometimes she portrays herself as the victim a lot and she did this time around. … You approved the thing where Kanye said he’d have sex with you but you didnt hear the time he said bitch? Like, come on. Like, it’s all the same thing to me … so I think she just way overreacted and I think she tried to get attention by saying she didn’t approve of that.”

I’ve stayed out of the Taylor Swift vs. Kanye West and Kim Kardashian feud to this point. But now that my girl Eugenie Bouchard has weighed in, I can no longer be silent. It was either Dante Alighieri or Melania Trump who said that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who do not take sides in a great moral crisis. And this is one of those times.

I cannot be neutral on this one any longer. I should start by admitting I am predisposed to being on Team Taylor. Her catchy pop hooks and tender, bittersweet breakup songs touch the essence of my soul time and again. I also believe with all my heart that the Kardashians are all the sins of mankind made flesh, and Kim is the queen of their evil collective. So without question I went into this prepared to take Taylor’s side.

But when T-Swift loses Euenie Bouchard’s vote, she has lost mine. When adorable, talented, iconic Millennial blonds can’t stick together, than there is something really, really wrong going on. Taylor was caught in a lie, and people of integrity like me and Genie have to admit it. As much as it pains me to say it, Kimye are right in this one.

Or, the entire stupid thing is a made up publicity stunt to generate clicks for the “Famous”
video and sell Kanye’s crappy song. Either way, I’m on Team Eugenie, as always.

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A photo posted by Genie Bouchard (@geniebouchard) on

 

 

A photo posted by Genie Bouchard (@geniebouchard) on

 

Blog Author: 
Jerry Thornton

 

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There is an old adage in politics that I made up shortly after I began typing this that goes, “The campaign doesn’t begin until the two running mates show the world they don’t know each other well enough yet to know how to properly make physical contact with one another.” And that was on full display at the Republican National Convention Wednesday when Donald Trump and Mike Pence put on the most awkward display of touching by two men since the infamous manhug in the waves scene in “Rocky III.” 

In fairness to the Republican ticket, it’s really hard to know how to physically engage another man. Every guy is different. Some go for the fistbump. Some have complex handshakes. Some are OK with the handshake/shoulder bump thing. And some, like The Donald, pucker up to go in for the kiss, whereas your Mike Pence’s prefer to keep lips at a safe distance of six inches or so. Anyway, it the campaign is officially underway. We know that because we’ve had our first real moment the Internet could have a field day with. Enjoy.

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Blog Author: 
Jerry Thornton

There is an old adage in politics that I made up shortly after I began typing this that goes, “The campaign doesn’t begin until the two running mates show the world they don’t know each other well enough yet to know how to properly make physical contact with one another.” And that was on full display at the Republican National Convention Wednesday when Donald Trump and Mike Pence put on the most awkward display of touching by two men since the infamous manhug in the waves scene in “Rocky III.” 

In fairness to the Republican ticket, it’s really hard to know how to physically engage another man. Every guy is different. Some go for the fistbump. Some have complex handshakes. Some are OK with the handshake/shoulder bump thing. And some, like The Donald, pucker up to go in for the kiss, whereas your Mike Pence’s prefer to keep lips at a safe distance of six inches or so. Anyway, it the campaign is officially underway. We know that because we’ve had our first real moment the Internet could have a field day with. Enjoy.

.  

 

 

 

 

 

Blog Author: 
Jerry Thornton
Kirk Minihane is joined by Boston comedy legend Lenny Clarke. If you are a fan of stand up comedy this is the podcast for you. Kirk and Lenny talk about Carlin, Pryor, Williams, Murphy and many more.

Welcome to Thursday’s Morning Mashup. For the latest news, start at our WEEI.com home page or click here for the top stories from our news wire.

Welcome to Thursday’s Morning Mashup. For the latest news, start at our WEEI.com home page or click here for the top stories from our news wire.

THURSDAY’S BROADCAST HIGHLIGHTS:
MLB: Twins at Red Sox, 7:10 p.m. (NESN; WEEI-FM)
MLB: Dodgers at Nationals, noon (MLB Network)
MLB: Orioles at Yankees, 3 p.m. (MLB Network)
MLB: Tigers at White Sox, 8 p.m. (MLB Network)
MLB: Rays at Athletics, 11 p.m. (MLB Network)
WNBA: Fever at Liberty, 11 a.m. (NBA TV)
Cycling: Tour de France, 8 a.m. (NBCSN)

AROUND THE WEB:

Mike Ditka (Kyle Terada/USA Today Sports)

Mike Ditka downplayed the Deflategate controversy. (Kyle Terada/USA Today Sports)

— Mike Ditka won’t be appearing at the Republican National Convention, but the ESPN NFL analyst isn’t hiding his support for Donald Trump.

The 76-year-old Ditka, who describes himself as “ultra-ultra conservative,” said he passed on an offer to speak at the RNC in Cleveland.

“I support Trump all the way, I really do. I just don’t think that’s where I belong, in Cleveland right now, I really don’t,” the former Bears coach told the Sporting News.

Ditka, who last year called Barack Obama the worst president in history, is aware that other analysts have run afoul of ESPN by speaking out on political issues (hello, Curt Schilling), but he said he has no plans to hide his opinions.

“I’m not going to change,” he said. “Eventually, I’ll say something that will probably aggravate people. That doesn’t work either, today, you know that?”

As for critics of America, he stated: “If you don’t like the way that our democracy was set up, haul your ass out of the country. Go somewhere else.”

Touching on Deflategate, Ditka said the issue is not worth the attention it’s been getting.

“I think it’s overblown, but that’s only my opinion,” he said. “I don’t think the New England Patriots or Tom Brady have to cheat to win. That’s only my opinion. You can spin it any way you want to and say, ‘Well, you can’t doctor the ball.’ … When I was playing, we played in the cold at Wrigley Field. Balls have kind of a wax on them when they’re new. We had a solvent solution. We had all the ball boys and managers scrub all the wax off of them. When we played with a ball at Wrigley Field, it didn’t have that shiny look. We took it all off. That was so you could grip it. It was only common sense. I mean, it was below-zero weather sometimes. You had this shiny stuff on it. That’s not conducive to good football, whether kicking it, throwing it or catching it. I could remember we did that. I can honestly say that. That’s when I was a player.”

— Four years after Linsanity gripped New York, Jeremy Lin was introduced Wednesday as one of five new members of the Nets, and the Harvard product looked back with mostly fondness on his breakthrough in the NBA.

“When it first started, I’m not going to lie, it was cool, and then it became a burden,” he told reporters in Brooklyn. “I didn’t really know what I had gotten myself into. One, two, three, four years later, every year I embrace it more. Every year I’m more appreciative, every year I love it more.”

Lin, 27, signed a three-year, $36 million deal after leaving the Hornets as a free agent. He returns to a New York that has moved on from Linsanity, and that’s fine with him.

“Not in a way that I’m offended, but it kind of dehumanizes me to refer to me as a phenomenon,” he said. “I’m going to be here, keep playing my game, and whatever you guys want to call it, it’s up to you guys.”

The son of Taiwanese immigrants, Lin returns to a metropolitan area with the largest Chinese population outside of Asia (more than a half-million). The Nets already have reached out to Asian groups around the city to stir up interest.

“Chinese people, Asian-Americans, Asians, they always have a special place in my heart,” Lin said. “Coming back here, I want to be able to try to inspire the next generation, reach out in the community.”

— Kelsie Whitmore, one of two members of the U.S. women’s national baseball team who are playing for a men’s independent league team in California, recorded her first hit with the team Wednesday.

Whitmore, playing for the Sonoma Stompers, hit a ground ball into right field and almost picked up an RBI, but the San Rafael Pacifics threw out her teammate at home.

After the hit, while a teammate retrieved the ball and handed it to her parents in the stands, Whitmore kept her emotions in check.

“A lot of the guys were asking why I wasn’t jumping up and down. My thought process was, ‘That’s just one hit. I need more.’ ” she told MLB.com.

Whitmore is scheduled to pitch Friday, and a third women’s national team player, Ann Kimbrel, will join the team to catch Whitmore, forming the first women’s battery in men’s pro baseball history.

ON THIS DAY TRIVIA (answer below): On July 21, 1959, who became the first African-American to play for the Red Sox when he pinch ran and and stayed in to play shortstop in a 2-1 loss to the White Sox in Chicago?

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “I take it one day at a time. By tonight I’ll flush everything out, but that’s not me out there.” — new Red Sox pitcher Drew Pomeranz, after allowing five runs in three-plus innings in Wednesday’s 11-7 victory over the Giants

STAT OF THE DAY: 3 — Home runs Wednesday for Hanley Ramirez, who collected six RBIs in the process

‘NET RESULTS: Leonys Martin hits a walk-off home run in the 12th inning to give the Mariners a win over the White Sox.

TRIVIA ANSWER: Pumpsie Green

SOOTHING SOUNDS: Yusuf Islam, formerly known as Cat Stevens, was born on this day in 1948.

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar

Welcome to Thursday’s Morning Mashup. For the latest news, start at our WEEI.com home page or click here for the top stories from our news wire.

THURSDAY’S BROADCAST HIGHLIGHTS:
MLB: Twins at Red Sox, 7:10 p.m. (NESN; WEEI-FM)
MLB: Dodgers at Nationals, noon (MLB Network)
MLB: Orioles at Yankees, 3 p.m. (MLB Network)
MLB: Tigers at White Sox, 8 p.m. (MLB Network)
MLB: Rays at Athletics, 11 p.m. (MLB Network)
WNBA: Fever at Liberty, 11 a.m. (NBA TV)
Cycling: Tour de France, 8 a.m. (NBCSN)

AROUND THE WEB:

Mike Ditka (Kyle Terada/USA Today Sports)

Mike Ditka downplayed the Deflategate controversy. (Kyle Terada/USA Today Sports)

— Mike Ditka won’t be appearing at the Republican National Convention, but the ESPN NFL analyst isn’t hiding his support for Donald Trump.

The 76-year-old Ditka, who describes himself as “ultra-ultra conservative,” said he passed on an offer to speak at the RNC in Cleveland.

“I support Trump all the way, I really do. I just don’t think that’s where I belong, in Cleveland right now, I really don’t,” the former Bears coach told the Sporting News.

Ditka, who last year called Barack Obama the worst president in history, is aware that other analysts have run afoul of ESPN by speaking out on political issues (hello, Curt Schilling), but he said he has no plans to hide his opinions.

“I’m not going to change,” he said. “Eventually, I’ll say something that will probably aggravate people. That doesn’t work either, today, you know that?”

As for critics of America, he stated: “If you don’t like the way that our democracy was set up, haul your ass out of the country. Go somewhere else.”

Touching on Deflategate, Ditka said the issue is not worth the attention it’s been getting.

“I think it’s overblown, but that’s only my opinion,” he said. “I don’t think the New England Patriots or Tom Brady have to cheat to win. That’s only my opinion. You can spin it any way you want to and say, ‘Well, you can’t doctor the ball.’ … When I was playing, we played in the cold at Wrigley Field. Balls have kind of a wax on them when they’re new. We had a solvent solution. We had all the ball boys and managers scrub all the wax off of them. When we played with a ball at Wrigley Field, it didn’t have that shiny look. We took it all off. That was so you could grip it. It was only common sense. I mean, it was below-zero weather sometimes. You had this shiny stuff on it. That’s not conducive to good football, whether kicking it, throwing it or catching it. I could remember we did that. I can honestly say that. That’s when I was a player.”

— Four years after Linsanity gripped New York, Jeremy Lin was introduced Wednesday as one of five new members of the Nets, and the Harvard product looked back with mostly fondness on his breakthrough in the NBA.

“When it first started, I’m not going to lie, it was cool, and then it became a burden,” he told reporters in Brooklyn. “I didn’t really know what I had gotten myself into. One, two, three, four years later, every year I embrace it more. Every year I’m more appreciative, every year I love it more.”

Lin, 27, signed a three-year, $36 million deal after leaving the Hornets as a free agent. He returns to a New York that has moved on from Linsanity, and that’s fine with him.

“Not in a way that I’m offended, but it kind of dehumanizes me to refer to me as a phenomenon,” he said. “I’m going to be here, keep playing my game, and whatever you guys want to call it, it’s up to you guys.”

The son of Taiwanese immigrants, Lin returns to a metropolitan area with the largest Chinese population outside of Asia (more than a half-million). The Nets already have reached out to Asian groups around the city to stir up interest.

“Chinese people, Asian-Americans, Asians, they always have a special place in my heart,” Lin said. “Coming back here, I want to be able to try to inspire the next generation, reach out in the community.”

— Kelsie Whitmore, one of two members of the U.S. women’s national baseball team who are playing for a men’s independent league team in California, recorded her first hit with the team Wednesday.

Whitmore, playing for the Sonoma Stompers, hit a ground ball into right field and almost picked up an RBI, but the San Rafael Pacifics threw out her teammate at home.

After the hit, while a teammate retrieved the ball and handed it to her parents in the stands, Whitmore kept her emotions in check.

“A lot of the guys were asking why I wasn’t jumping up and down. My thought process was, ‘That’s just one hit. I need more.’ ” she told MLB.com.

Whitmore is scheduled to pitch Friday, and a third women’s national team player, Ann Kimbrel, will join the team to catch Whitmore, forming the first women’s battery in men’s pro baseball history.

ON THIS DAY TRIVIA (answer below): On July 21, 1959, who became the first African-American to play for the Red Sox when he pinch ran and and stayed in to play shortstop in a 2-1 loss to the White Sox in Chicago?

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “I take it one day at a time. By tonight I’ll flush everything out, but that’s not me out there.” — new Red Sox pitcher Drew Pomeranz, after allowing five runs in three-plus innings in Wednesday’s 11-7 victory over the Giants

STAT OF THE DAY: 3 — Home runs Wednesday for Hanley Ramirez, who collected six RBIs in the process

‘NET RESULTS: Leonys Martin hits a walk-off home run in the 12th inning to give the Mariners a win over the White Sox.

TRIVIA ANSWER: Pumpsie Green

SOOTHING SOUNDS: Yusuf Islam, formerly known as Cat Stevens, was born on this day in 1948.

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar
We discuss the state of the Sox with manager John Farrell.
We discuss the state of the Sox with manager John Farrell.