The world has not ended, but there are a few individuals in the sports world who probably wish the Internet was destroyed. In the news Friday we have a former Olympian admitting a double life, an ESPN talker learning the duration of his suspension, and another NFL player receiving a death threat on Twitter.

The Jets appear ready to start over at quarterback. According to the New York Daily News, the team will look to trade Mark Sanchez after the season -- although it likely will be difficult to find a team willing to pay Sanchez the $8.25 million he's owed. Sanchez, in his fourth season in New York after being selected fifth overall in the 2009 draft, has been benched in favor of Greg McElroy for Sunday's game against the Chargers following his disastrous five-turnover performance in this past Sunday's 14-10 loss to the Titans that ended the Jets' playoff hopes.

Greg McElroy was named Jets starter following Mark Sanchez' five-turnover performance Monday night, and apparently that's not sitting well with Tim Tebow. According to a report from the New York Daily News, Tebow will ask to be traded or released after the season if he does not get more of an opportunity in the last two games.

Jets coach Rex Ryan said Sanchez respected the coach's decision to bench him, but Ryan has not publicly addressed the Tebow situation.

The Jets' hopes of making the playoffs were ended Monday night with a brutal 14-10 road loss to the Titans. Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez threw four interceptions but was in position to win the game after a 19-yard punt gave New York the ball at the Tennessee 25 with 47 seconds remaining. However, Sanchez couldn't handle a low shotgun snap on first down and the Titans recovered the fumble.

ESPN play-by-play caller Mike Tirico summed it up best, saying: "That's the way this game should end, that's the way the Jets' season should end: Ugly, and a loss."

The NFL paid tribute to the victims of the Connecticut elementary school shooting during Sunday's games. The Patriots had a pregame tribute featuring 26 flares in honor of the 20 children and six school employees who died Friday. The team's End Zone Militia silenced the guns that they normally fire after the Patriots score.

"Out of respect for those that were killed, we were asked yesterday not to fire the muskets, which we all agreed with," End Zone Militia sergeant Bob Elliott said. "It was just such a horrific thing. It's hard to put it into words."

ESPN host Rob Parker is the talk of the Internet following his analysis of Washington rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III as it pertains to the black community.

RGIII responded to a reporter's question on Wednesday by saying:

There was speculation that former Red Sox infielder Kevin Youkilis would be hesitant to join the Yankees considering the feud he had with Joba Chamberlain. The Yankees hurler was suspended two games in his rookie season of 2007 for firing a fastball over Youkilis' head, and in 2008 Youkilis started to charge the mound but was stopped after another near-beaning. Chamberlain hit Youkilis with a pitch last season after the infielder had moved on to the White Sox.

Mike Brown is just a memory for the Lakers, but the team's losing ways have continued under new coach Mike D'Antoni. The Lakers are 4-8 under D'Antoni and 9-12 overall following Tuesday night's 100-94 loss to the lowly Cavaliers in Cleveland.

"This is one of the most challenging stretches of my 17 years, and the most baffling, too," Kobe Bryant said. "We have the talent and personnel to do it, but we're not, and it's baffling. It's extremely frustrating. It doesn't make any sense. We're still finding ways to lose games."

In one of the strangest NBA ejections ever, normally mild-mannered Raptors forward Amir Johnson was thrown out of Monday night's game against the Trail Blazers when he tried to take the ball from referee David Jones after a Portland free throw and wouldn't let go. After his ejection, an incensed Johnson fired his mouthguard at Jones and hit him in the back.

At least seven NFL players have surrendered their guns to team personnel in the wake of last week's murder-suicide in Kansas City, according to Sports Illustrated's Peter King.

King, who revealed the information on NBC's "Football Night in America" pregame show Sunday night, reported that one player turned in multiple weapons, saying that he didn't trust himself with the guns.

Following last week's incident involving Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, it's been speculated that about 70 percent of NFL players own at least one gun, with many owning more than one.