In Thursday's Morning Mashup we have video of Joe Girardi telling a White Sox fan off after the Yankees lost their third straight in Chicago. New York's lead in the AL East lead is down to the three games over the Rays, but the team isn't panicking. 

Via ESPN New York:

"Oh, is it down to three games?" Nick Swisher said.

The Astros are sending a scout to look at Roger Clemens pitch for the Sugar Land Skeeters. Clemens has downplayed the possibility of a return to the majors. You, me, and your aunt's parrot know that's his ideal end game, however. If Clemens were to pitch at the major league level it would push back his Hall of Fame eligibility.

Via Sports Illustrated:

In Monday's Morning Mashup, the New York media turns on the Jets after their woeful performance in Saturday night's preseason game against the Giants.

Writes Steve Serby of the New York Post:

There is one game at which the Jets can score at will, in any number of ways. It is not a football game.

It is The Blame Game.

A fan collapsed and died during Thursday night's game between the Blue Jays and White Sox in Toronto. White Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis alerted umpires upon seeing a commotion in the stands, and the game was stopped for four minutes in the bottom of the seventh inning while the fan -- identified by the Toronto Star as a 60-year-old man -- received CPR and was taken out on a stretcher.

Much of the chatter from Jets camp is how Mark Sanchez is coming into his own. This makes sense, of course, Sanchez is entering his fourth season as a quarterback and has ample playoff experience to go along with it. What irks me is that many of these columns don't address those factors. Instead, most look at habits I'd expect my starting quarterback to have before Year 4. For example, last week we read about how Sanchez has improved his offseason work ethic as if it was this huge accomplishment. Friday, word is Sanchez is finally comfortable holding others accountable. 

Here’s some free advice for Larry Lucchino. Hold a press conference and begin it with the following words:

“We’re sorry and embarrassed for the way our organization has behaved.”



MIKE PETRAGLIA

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In Thursday's Morning mashup check out a gruesome video of Torii Hunter's spikes meeting a home plate umpire's face, then take a second to really think, and debate whether umpires are overpaid or not. Also, Michael Jordan is debating Dream Team vs. the current Team USA again, the United States Mens National soccer team beat Mexico in Mexico for the first time in its history, and news of a Michael J. Fox comeback.

Head to Wednesday's Morning Mashup and check out video in Miami of Chad Johnson being released from the Dolphins courtesy of HBO's "Hard Knocks." This, of course, was just one piece of news in a bizarre four days from the former Patriots player. The video itself is anticlimactic, but there is so much going on in Johnson's world that it probably did not register properly.

The free agent wide receiver released a statement regarding his wild four-day journey, which includes news that he and his wife, Evelyn Lozada, will file for divorce following his arrest for assault.

Longtime Yankees general manager Brian Cashman has been through a great deal of turmoil during his time under the Steinbrenner family. Ian O'Connor of ESPN New York dives into Cashman's legacy, and his resume of personnel decisions.

Writes O'Connor:

Last fall, Hal Steinbrenner gave his GM $9 million over three years to continue making the calls he first started making in February of 1998, when a 30-year-old Cashman replaced Bob Watson and immediately confessed he was an administrator who didn't count personnel evaluation among his strengths.

The LeBron James has figured it out narrative is a story you've been reading about since the Heat made easy work of the Thunder in five measly games during the NBA finals. With another rousing performance during the Olympics, James has restarted the conversation just as it cooled off. Frankly, he probably deserves the praise as much as he deserved the post-Decision scorn, meaning it's overstated but has merit as well.