R.J. Hunter

R.J. Hunter

In what didn’t feel like a preseason matchup, the Celtics’ offense flexed its muscles by scoring 119 points in their final road game before the regular season.

The Celtics shot nearly 60 percent (58.9) from the floor en route to a 119-107 win over the Knicks. After holding onto a double-digit lead for most of the game, the Knicks cut their deficit to six points before R.J. Hunter erupted in the fourth quarter — where he scored most of his game-high 17 points on 6-of-8 shots, including 2-of-4 from deep. 

Horford caught fire early as he knocked down his first five attempts in the first half — including back-to-back 3-pointers — and finished with 12 points and two blocks. Avery Bradley’s 15 points on 7-of-9 shots led the Celtics’ first-half surge. Both starters led the offense and helped the C’s take a 59-50 lead into the half. 

After the break, Marcus Smart (13 points, 3 steals) carried the momentum while most of the starters cheered from the bench. So far, Smart is shooting 70 percent (14-of-20) from inside the 3-point arc throughout the preseason. He may not be knocking down shots from deep but he’s been very consistent from the mid-range and continues to be a force on defense. 

For a full box score, click here

In what was a regular season-like atmosphere at Madison Square Garden, the Knicks erased their double-digit deficit in the fourth quarter before the Celtics put together a late-game run to close out the win. Behind great shooting and solid defense — one that forced 20 Knicks turnovers — the C’s dominated throughout most of the game. 

Hunter — who’s believed to be on the bubble for making the team’s final 16-man roster — certainly made a case for himself in what may have been his best outing as a member of the Celtics. The second-year guard not only knocked down a pair of 3-pointers but also drove against the defense, got to the hoop and to the free-throw line. 

The Celtics will close out their preseason schedule with a pair of home games this week on Monday against the Nets and Wednesday against the Knicks. 

Blog Author: 
Josue Pavon

Prior to Thursday night’s game, Celtics head coach Brad Stevens made an announcement that wasn’t so much surprising, rather thought-provoking. 

“Ten (players) is what we usually play at the start of the season,” Stevens said. “It could be eight to ten, nine to ten.”

“Anytime you can get to a solid eight or nine in a rotation, that’s beneficial.”

That is conceivably going to leave a valuable asset out of the rotation. With his starting lineup of Al Horford, Amir Johnson, Jae Crowder, Avery Bradley and Isaiah Thomas all but in ink, there would be two to four players vying for minutes.

Marcus Smart will also be a lock as the first man off the bench — as Stevens has often referred to him as a “sixth starter.” Once healthy, Kelly Olynyk will likely be in the same situation.

There is some fluidity after that, however.

Stevens did note that his rotation can, and likely will, change on a game-to-game basis.

“We have to have everybody ready to go,” said Stevens who added, “and some days it’ll be a solid eight plus 2 (players) but that plus 2 may change game to game depending on who we’re playing, how they played against them, how they played in practice, how they played the game before.”

With the summer league and preseason that Terry Rozier has had, reasonable minds can believe he would be in the rotation. However, ball handling and distribution are two things you could essentially get out of Smart, plus he would provide better defense. In an event where the Celtics are going to need to attempt to matchup in height with opposing teams, Rozier could see himself squeezed out of the rotation. 

Then there’s Jaylen Brown. The rookie is a fascinating case because if he’s not going to be in the rotation, then he would be better suited playing in the D-League, which is not exactly the best PR move for a team’s No. 3 pick in the draft. That aside, however, he’s proven that his game has translated well to the NBA and the Celtics could definitely use his athleticism.

Jonas Jerebko is a perplexing case as well. Seemingly every time he appears to be falling out of Stevens’ good graces, he pops a 12-point performance off the bench, as he did Thursday (and lest we forget the 2016 postseason, as well). His problem, however, is that he’ll be more or less absent for stretches, and when his shot from 15-to 18-feet is off, he can render himself useless on the offensive end.

Bottom line, Stevens knows what he’s getting with Jerebko. He doesn’t have to worry about developing him, he’s a slightly above-average defender, who has a shot that can be lethal when it’s on. It’s hard to imagine him being phased out of the rotation — especially early on in the season — but it’s a legitimate possibility if he hits a cold streak.

Another veteran in a precarious position is Gerald Green. Green didn’t even see the floor until about five and a half minutes remained in the third quarter Thursday. There are too many enticing options at Stevens’ disposal to allow Green to get meaningful minutes. Conversely, he posesses one of the biggest tools the Celtics as a whole lack: a shot. However, he’s yet to exhibit any reliability as a shooter in his two preseason appearances, going a combined 0-for-4 from deep. He’s otherwise 9-from-20 from the field. He is the type of player destined to be the first man out, especially when his shot is cold.

Tyler Zeller hasn’t exactly had a camp to remember thus far. And with his history of fluctuating minutes, it already looks as if he’s destined for the same scenario as 2015-16, where he could be playing three minutes one night, but 18 the other. 

One player that is making more of a case for himself is Jordan Mickey. A big leader in the late surge that pushed the Celtics bench past the Nets on Thursday, Mickey has started to look much more acclimated to the NBA than last year, even after tearing up the D-League. He may be an afterthought to start the season, but the amount of meaningful minutes he may get could certainly increase.

It should all come down to matchups. Stevens isn’t afraid to play small, and there is enough diversity in skill amongst bench players to where he has a quality arsenal to work with. As camp continues and more players begin to establish — or hurt — their value, the rotation should begin to take more of a shape, with some understandable flexibility taking place as well.

Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

The Celtics are set to become quite familiar with the Nets, with three matchups against Brooklyn in the next two weeks, one of which is the season opener on Oct. 26.

Oct 13, 2016; Brooklyn, NY, USA; Brooklyn Nets center Brook Lopez 911) defends against Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart (36) as he goes up for a shot during a preseason game during the first half at Barclays Center. Mandatory Credit: Andy Marlin-USA TODAY Sports

Nets center Brook Lopez (11) defends against Celtics guard Marcus Smart (36) as he goes up for a shot during a preseason game during the first half at Barclays Center. (Andy Marlin/USA Today Sports)

The Celtics are set to become quite familiar with the Nets, with three matchups against Brooklyn in the next two weeks, one of which is the season opener on Oct. 26.

In the first of those three matchups Thursday in Brooklyn, a late surge sent the Celtics to victory 100-97. Led by the unassuming five-pice of Gerald Green, Jordan Mickey, Terry Rozier, Jaylen brown and R.J. Hunter, the C’s finagled a 6-0 run at the end of the game to grind out the victory.

Al Horford nearly had a double-double, finishing with nine rebounds to accompany his 13 points. Isaiah Thomas and Jonas Jerebko turned in 12-point performances. 

For a full box score, click here

The game had a more regular-season feel to it for a number of reasons. In his pregame press conference, head coach Brad Stevens discussed that his rotation come the start of the season would be an “8-plus-2”  type scenario, making time off the bench all the more difficult to grab.

As it turned out, just 10 players took the floor for the Celtics for the first 30-plus minutes of the game, with Green being one of the noticeable omissions up until that point.

Those who did see time, however, played with regular season intensity.

The ball oftentimes was on the floor, with bodies in both green and white jerseys sprawled across the hardwood in attempt to maintain possession. Passing was in midseason form, as it was by-and-large crisp, quick and accurate. 

Spending plenty of time at the point, Marcus Smart was an impressive ball distributor, managing four assists while defensively grabbing two steals. His shooting, however, remained a problem. He air-balled a 3-pointer, as well as bricking one off the backiron en route to four missed 3-pointers on as many attempts, while shooting 4-of-9 from the field overall. He finished with a tie for the team-lead with 13 points.

Horford continued to make most everyone’s job on the floor easier, opening up space whilst owning the glass on both ends of the floor. The Horford-Amir Johnson frontcourt continued to gel, as Horford’s dominance on along the glass — especially defensively — enabled Johnson to help run the floor in transition. Periodically, Johnson would be the second player in the paint on a fastbreak, regardless of if he touched the ball or not.

Also linking up well were Smart and Brown. The most notable of the connections came in the second quarter when Smart sidearmed an alley-oop pass from the 3-point line to Brown, who finished the dunk. 


Brown ended the night with 10 points and three assists.

The second and third units managed not to fall apart, given a two-point lead when entering the game with nearly five and a half minutes remaining in the third. Instead, they took it and turned it into a three-point victory.

The Celtics get back in action at Madison Square Garden on Saturday against the Knicks.


Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

Amir Johnson

Amir Johnson

Expect to see Amir Johnson changing things up this season.

When the Celtics went out and signed Al Horford, the laundry list of things he brought to the table were apparent, but one thing that flew under the radar was how he can help other players. And just over two weeks into camp, he’s already found a way to make fellow starter and big man Amir Johnson better.

“Chemistry is great, you know, it’s just me working around Al, Al working around me and we’re just putting it together,” the 29-year-old Johnson said.

The now-12-year pro noted that one dimension of his game that he is looking to improve is his 3-point shot. Last season, Johnson pulled from deep 43 times, executing on just 10 occasions for a 23.3 percent 3-point percentage, well below his career average of 31.5 percent from deep.

But with the addition of Horford, who can already do it all, it provides Johnson the flexibility to test his shot.

“Guys are starting to step out to that 3-pointer, and guys are definitely guarding outside the 3-point line, so it definitely changes in that aspect there,” Johnson said. “Every big man wants to step out and shoot the 3 and handle the ball, but now guys are working on it.”

With a player like Johnson implementing a 3-point shot more into his game, it can also have a less clear benefit. Regardless of if the shot gets knocked down, if Johnson is able to lure an equally-tall defender out to the perimeter, it gives a natural rim-protector like Horford a chance to isolate and grab the offensive board.

But whether Johnson is shooting or not, Horford’s versatility makes his life a lot easier.

“Al’s definitely one of those versatile bigs, able to pass the ball, step out and shoot the shot. For me it just kind of makes it easier just to work around him because you know he can the pass, you know he can make the shot,” Johnson said.

The synergy between the two is helping Johnson on the other end of the court as well.

For a 6-foot-9 forward, Johnson has tremendous pace and has oftentimes presented himself as a threat in transition. The problem last season, however, was he was called upon to be the primary rim protector, which in terms limited his opportunity to run the floor.

“It’s just good to know you have someone behind you that can definitely block the shot or grab the board, I’m able to run in transition while he’s able to take care of the glass,” Johnson said of Horford.

There’s also a level of comfort surrounding Johnson now that he’s spent a full season in Boston — and it shows. He’s been more vocal on the court and according to multiple players, in the locker room as well.

“I just think that comes with being more comfortable with the system, being around for a year,” said head coach Brad Stevens. “You kind of hear that and see that, a lot of people talk about the adjustment period. Usually when people come for the first time, they’re quiet because they’re trying to take it all in.”

Other Practice Notes

— Kelly Olynyk’s shoulder is going to be reevaluated later this week while the team is in New York by the doctor who performed the surgery.

Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

The speculation has circulated for a while, but now it can be booked: Paul Pierce is going to retire a member of the Celtics.

The speculation has circulated for a while, but now it can be booked: Paul Pierce is going to retire a member of the Celtics.

The 38-year old, who will turn 39 on Thursday — had announced on the Players Tribune on Sept. 26 that he would retire after one more season with the Clippers in 2016-17. Speaking on Sirius XM NBA, Pierce announced that he would sign a one-day contract with the C’s at the conclusion of this season and retire as a member of the Celtics.

Pierce said that he owes it to himself and the fans.


After being drafted 10th overall to the Celtics in 1998, The Truth went on to an extensive and prolific 15-year career in Boston that saw him win a ring in 2008 — in which he was the finals MVP — before getting traded to the Nets in 2013.

The writing has been on the wall for Pierce to make such a move, all it was missing, however, was his affirmation. His current coach with the Clippers as well as his longtime boss with the Celtics Doc Rivers noted just weeks before Pierce’s announcement that the forward’s “got to retire a Celtic.”

The Clippers will visit the Celtics at the Garden on Feb. 5.

Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

Jordan Mickey

Jordan Mickey

UNCASVILLE, CT — In a game where Brad Stevens rested four of his five starters and had to do without backup guard Terry Rozier in the second half, the Celtics defeated the Hornets in their second consecutive preseason match up, 104-86. 

Jae Crowder was the starting lineup’s lone member who played in this one. He started at the power forward position in a small-ball lineup that included Tyler Zeller at center, rookie Jaylen Brown at small forward, Marcus Smart at the point and Gerald Green — who made his preseason debut.

Both teams got off to a sloppy start and finished the game’s first 12 minutes tied at 18. Although the Celtics forced five turnovers in the first quarter — including four in the opening minutes — they struggled in transition on offense and committed six turnovers.  Making matters worse, Rozier (4 points, 2 rebounds) left the game early in the second quarter when he was elbowed in the face while attempting to take a charge against Hornets center Christian Wood. He received seven stitches and never returned.

The Celtics’ offense found its rhythm against the Hornets in the second quarter as they took a 49-38 lead into halftime. Zeller scored 10 of his 14 points in the first half — he finished 5-of-7 from the floor, including 4-of-4 from the charity stripe. He did a stellar job of knocking down open mid-range jump shots and finishing strong in the paint.

For a full box score, click here

In his first game as an NBA starter, Brown was ice cold on offense — he shot 20 percent on 2-of-10 shots and finished with four points in 27 minutes. Green — who didn’t shy away from taking jumpers from the perimeter — had a strong first performance. He finished with 13 points on 5-of-12 shots.

The Celtics kept their foot on the gas petal in the second half — where they took a 82-64 lead into the final frame. Jordan Mickey caught fire for the C’s in the second half  — he scored a game-high 16 points and pulled down 6 rebounds in 22 minutes.  

The C’s defense was certainly the story of the night. They forced the Hornets to take tough shots, locked down the perimeter — where Charlotte shot 1-of-19 (5.3 percent) — and forced 20 turnovers. Although the Hornets managed to out-rebound the Celtics, 50-35, the C’s offense sparked the second-half blowout as they shot 44.4 percent from the floor and held on to the lead in the final 12 minutes. 

Blog Author: 
Josue Pavon

Oct 6, 2016; Greensboro, NC, USA; Charlotte Hornets forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (14) shoots the ball against the Boston Celtics during the first half at Greensboro Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

Hornets forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (14) shoots the ball against Jae Crowder and Al Horford Thursday at Greensboro Coliseum. (Jeremy Brevard-USA Today Sports)

After beating the Hornets Thursday night in a preseason contest, the Celtics will now hold their breath on their star point guard.

Isaiah Thomas injured his left wrist early in the third quarter when he fought his way through a Roy Hibbert screen and came out of the game.

He did not return with what the team termed a “slightly sprained” left wrist. It is the same wrist that he had arthroscopic surgery on in Aug. 2014. Jaylen Brown subbed in for Thomas with 7:07 left in the third quarter.

As for the game, the Celtics (1-1) scored 40 points in the third quarter and rolled to a 107-92 win in a preseason game Thursday night at the Greensboro Coliseum.

Before coming out, Thomas led the Celtics with 15 points on 5-of-10 shooting in 20 minutes. Al Horford scored nine of his 13 points in the third quarter. He also grabbed eight rebounds in his 19 minutes of playing time. 

For a full box score, click here

For a second straight game, head coach Brad Stevens started a lineup of Thomas, Avery Bradley, Horford, Jae Crowder and Amir Johnson. 

The Celtics raced out to a 22-14 lead in the first quarter, thanks to more sharp-shooting from Avery Bradley. The guard was 3-for-5 from the field, including 1-of-2 from beyond the arc.

But the Celtics bench struggled again, missing their last six shots as the Hornets scored the last nine points to take a 23-22 lead after one. The Celtics, who started off red-hot Tuesday night, made just 8-of-22 from the field in the opening quarter. 

The learning curve continued for Jaylen Brown. He committed a mental error when he lost track of the shot clock at the end of the first quarter and passed the ball on the perimeter as the clock expired. He also failed to finish on a pair of drives to the basket. 

Stevens used the second quarter of the second preseason game to mix and match with the starters, going with a lineup of Bradley, Thomas, Terry Rozier, Amir Johnson and Jonas Jerebko. The Celtics trailed 51-44 at the half, throwing up 17 threes (making seven). Overall, the Celtics shot just 17-of-44 (38.6 percent) in the opening 24 minutes. Thomas was 3-for-5 from beyond the arc and had 11 in the first half to lead the Celtics. 

Unlike Tuesday, the Celtics starters opened the second half and it paid immediate dividends. The Celtics scored the first nine points of the third quarter for a 53-52 lead. One of the big highlights was two-handed monster slam from Horford on an inbounds pass from Crowder. Horford was fouled and hit the free throw for a three-point play. The Celtics were in complete control the rest of the quarter, outscoring the Hornets, 40-19, in the period.

The Celtics built their lead to as many as 21 in the fourth quarter, cruising to their first win of the preseason. 

The Celtics have a rematch with the Hornets on Saturday at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, CT. The Celtics will be the home team for the first time this season in the game that starts at 3:30 p.m. 

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia


Terry Rozier has been saying it for a while: Jaylen Brown is eventually going to be a nightmare for the rest of the NBA. 

How bad of a dream is up to the rookie out of Cal. 

On Tuesday night, in 20 minutes, Brown was 4-of-9 from the field for eight points and four rebounds.