Paul Pierce splits Kenyon Martin (left) and Keith Van Horn (right) during the 2002 Eastern Conference Finals.</p>
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Forward Guerschon Yabusele, who the Celtics selected No. 16 overall in the 2016 draft, will not play summer league ball this offseason following foot surgery to remove bone spurs from the top of both his feet, according to ES

Forward Guerschon Yabusele, who the Celtics selected No. 16 overall in the 2016 draft, will not play summer league ball this offseason following foot surgery to remove bone spurs from the top of both his feet, according to ESPN’s Chris Forsberg.

Following last year’s draft, the 6-foot-8, 265-pound power forward spent his first professional season stashed away in China, playing for the Shanghai Dongfang. While abroad he averaged an impressive 20.8 points and 9.4 rebounds per game.

The frenchman went on to finish his season back in the States, with the Celtics’ D-League affiliate, the Maine Red Claws. In five games coming off the bench, he averaged 12.8 points, 5.4 rebounds, and two assists, while shooting 49 percent from the field. 

As it stands, he should be fully recovered before the end of the summer and is expected to be ready for the start of training camp. 

Blog Author: 
Sam Alberti

Trailing 2-0 in the best-of-seven series following an embarrassing loss in Game 2, the Celtics needed something from someone. Guts, toughness, moxie — anything.

While they got a clutch shot from Avery Bradley to seal a comeback for the ages, they also received a different spark from the least expected source.

Jonas Jerebko.

Trailing 2-0 in the best-of-seven series following an embarrassing loss in Game 2, the Celtics needed something from someone. Guts, toughness, moxie — anything.

While they got a clutch shot from Avery Bradley to seal a comeback for the ages, they also received a different spark from the least expected source.

Jonas Jerebko.

Jerebko drilled a huge bucket to give the Celtics the lead with 30 seconds left, but he also got into it with both Kevin Love and Deron Williams during the game.

Late in the third quarter, he and Love tangled in the post with Love falling to the ground. He told him to “stand up, don’t flop.”

Jerebko echoed his in-game sentiments about Love to reporters after the game.

“I thought he flopped,” he said. “I don’t like people flopping. I don’t flop. So I just had to tell him. He kind of laughed. He knew he flopped. He knew he did it. He’s a great player, you know, but, stand up, don’t flop. That’s my motto at least.”

Jerebko also set some hard screens on Williams during the game and appeared to bring a bit of toughness to the Celtics who looked outmatched, and at times shell-shocked in Games 1 and 2.

“We needed something to get going, so it felt good,” he told TNT’s “Inside The NBA crew in a postgame interview with Charles Barkley.

He later added: “I think we gave them a little bit too much respect in those first two games. We’re out there to compete and I don’t think we competed that hard those two first games. I just wanted to come out there and play aggressive, and play with some attitude, and obviously it felt good to knock down some shots, too.”

Blog Author: 
Brooks Sutherland

The Boston Celtics handed the Cleveland Cavaliers their first loss of the 2017 playoffs with a Game 3 victory on the road. Avery Bradley hit the game-winning three-pointer with 0.1 seconds left in regulation.

Check out some photos from the game here.

(Rick Osentoski/USA Today Sports)

(Rick Osentoski/USA Today Sports)

Blog Author: 
Daniel Shulman

LeBron James was held scoreless in the final 16:31 of Game 3 Sunday. (Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports)

LeBron James was held scoreless in the final 16:31 of Game 3 Sunday. (Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports)

Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals was a throwback performance for LeBron James. Earlier in his career, James was dogged with accusations of playoff choke jobs and off-court petulance. He’s shed those labels in recent years, winning three world championships while serving as one of the league’s great ambassadors. 

But on Sunday night, the best player in the game reverted to his old habits. 

Following an abysmal 11-point performance, his lowest postseason output since Game 5 of the 2014 Eastern Conference Finals against the Pacers, James blasted a reporter afterwards who had the audacity to ask him what happened. Kenny Roda of WHBC in Canton, Ohio wanted to know why James could never get into a rhythm. In response, The King put him down.  

“I was just pretty poor. What do you want me to say?” he said. “It seems you like you only ask questions when we lose, huh? It’s this weird thing with you, Kenny. You always come around when we lose. That’s fine. Yeah, OK.”

Roda defended himself on Twitter, saying he “asks questions win or lose.” 

Prior to his podium sniping, James got into it with a heckler in the stands. The fan was reportedly removed from the arena while shouting his college stats

Following a tough playoff loss, there are probably few things more irritating to deal with than jeers from unruly fans and negative questions from radio reporters. But that’s part of the expectation when it comes to playing in the NBA. At this stage in his decorated career, James should be above picking fights with them. 

Six months ago, James was campaigning in Ohio with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, encouraging people to vote in the crucial swing state. But on Sunday, he acted like he did six years ago, when he played a leading role in the infamous “Decision” special

It shows that even an all-time great can have a bad day. 

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer

LeBron James snipes at a reporter after Game 3 loss: “You only ask questions when we lose… You always come around when we lose, I swear.” pic.twitter.com/QoIdcbK021

— Ben Golliver (@BenGolliver) May 22, 2017

LeBron James does not like being questioned after losses by the likes of you, Kenny.

That’s not some obscure South Park reference. It’s what happened after the Celtics dealt the Cavaliers their first loss of the postseason on Sunday night with an epic comeback, and a Cleveland radio reporter decided to ask The King a slightly negative question.

Kenny Roda of WHBC in Canton, Ohio asked James two questions — what happened to the defense in the third and fourth quarters, and then one about James struggling.

“You couldn’t get into a rhythm tonight based on their defense or just not feeling it, or what?” he asked.

James did not take kindly to the followup.

“I was just pretty poor. What do you want me to say?” he said. “It seems you like you only ask questions when we lose, huh? It’s this weird thing with you, Kenny. You always come around when we lose. That’s fine. Yeah, OK.”

Roda took to Twitter to defense himself, noting that he has attended every home game this postseason. “Ask questions win or lose,” he Tweeted.

That’s not the way James sees it. After leaving the podium, he continued to complain loudly about Roda in a hallway outside the interview room.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

CLEVELAND — Now that’s the Marcus Smart we could get used to.

Starting in place of injured point guard Isaiah Thomas, who will miss the rest of the postseason with a hip injury, Smart delivered the best game of his career, scoring 27 points, making seven 3-pointers, and setting up Avery Bradley for the buzzer-beating game-winner in Boston’s 111-108 victory.