The debate over the long-term future of Rajon Rondo in Boston will seemingly continue as long as he’s in a Celtics uniform. But one thing that can’t be denied is Rondo’s appreciation of those who have his back in turbulent times, led by the man who cuts his paycheck.

The debate over the long-term future of Rajon Rondo in Boston will seemingly continue as long as he’s in a Celtics uniform. But one thing that can’t be denied is Rondo’s appreciation of those who have his back in turbulent times, led by the man who cuts his paycheck.

Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck told the Boston Globe this week that despite all of the rumors and speculation on the future of the tempestuous point guard, Rondo remains the leader of the franchise going forward.

What did that mean to Rondo?

“It means a lot, especially coming from the head guy,” Rondo said after Friday’s loss to the Suns. “With all the rumors swirling, the criticism that I was having throughout the past couple weeks, he stuck his neck out. He didn’t have to say anything, but he did. I’ve talked to Wyc since then. Everything is what it’s supposed to be.”

Here is what Grousbeck told the Boston Globe in a story that reflected on the rebuilding season of 2013-14:

“[Rondo is] loved right here, from my seat on the court,” the owner said. “I love the guy. I love his championship ring when he was the young kid. I love his growth. It reminds me of Paul Pierce. Growing from the moments in his younger days and making progress toward being an all-time Celtic and a leader. I am always hopeful that a guy like that is going to stay around.”

Rondo will enter the final year of his contract next season, in which he will make $12.9 million.

Earlier this season, Rondo said he would be open to signing a long-term deal with the Celtics but, at the same time, indicated an interest to test free agent waters. Rondo signed a five-year, $55 million extension at the start of the 2009-10 season.

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

Brad Stevens made it perfectly clear before Friday’s game against Phoenix that he would ease Avery Bradley back into the mix after a 13-game absence due to a sprained right ankle. Bradley actually played nearly 17 minutes, including a key stretch in the team’s 12-0 spurt that gave them a short-lived lead in the fourth quarter of Friday’s 87-80 loss to the Suns at TD Garden.

Bradley scored nine points on 4-of-12 shooting from the floor but admitted that he was rusty trying to get back into an offensive rhythm.

“My shot was rusty, but you still can play hard on the defensive end and that’€™s what I try to do,” Bradley said. “I try to go out there and lift our intensity and try to get the guys going, that’€™s my role on this team.’€

When Bradley was out on the floor, it marked just the seventh time this season he and Rajon Rondo, the projected starting backcourt, had been available to coach Brad Stevens.

“Hopefully we’€™ll get to see that quite a bit in the last month here,” Stevens said. “Knock on wood, because they haven’€™t been able to play much together over the first four years they’€™ve been together. I think it’€™s really a duo that you would think would complement each other very well based on the strengths on both ends of the court. Hopefully we’€™ll see that again with a healthy month left in the season.”

“He looked well,” added Rondo. “He didn’€™t play or practice at all in a month. So, for him to get out there, I know he missed a couple shots, but for the most part, my main concern was his lateral movements, as far as the ankle, and his defense looked great tonight.

“Our time will come. I’€™ve missed [games], he’€™s missed [games]. Hopefully we can get it together and we’€™ll both be out there playing and healthy.”

Bradley also made note that he will be taping his ankles more often to prevent injury. Bradley said before the game that he feels not taping his ankles this season led to the unfortunate string of injuries that have sidelined him for two significant stretches this season.

After the game, he was just grateful that he made it through his first game back.

‘€œI feel fine, Bradley said. “It’€™s a little sore but I’€™m going to ice it and I’€™ll feel fine [this weekend]. “For me, on the defensive end and cuts, that’€™s what gets me going and I know what kind of player I am and I know it starts on the defensive end first for me.

‘€œOf course, as a competitor you want to go out there and help your team, but at the same time I have to be smart and the coaches, [Brad Stevens] knows better than me and he knows I have to get back in the rhythm. I was a little rusty and so he has to limit my minutes and he told me that before the game but I didn’€™t know how many minutes I was going to play and I really didn’€™t care.”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

Alex Len’s three-point play with 54.1 seconds left broke an 80-80 tie and lifted the Suns over the Celtics, 87-80, Friday night at TD Garden. Kris Humphries led the Celtics with 11 points and 13 rebounds. The Celtics lost their third straight and fell to 22-44 on the season.

Rajon Rondo gets around Phoenix's Ish Smith Friday night. (AP)

Rajon Rondo gets around Phoenix’s Ish Smith Friday night. (AP)

Alex Len’s three-point play with 54.1 seconds left broke an 80-80 tie and lifted the Suns over the Celtics, 87-80, Friday night at TD Garden. Kris Humphries led the Celtics with 11 points and 13 rebounds. The Celtics lost their third straight and fell to 22-44 on the season.

Cold shooting from the field put the the Celtics in an early hole, falling behind by as many as 11 in the opening minutes of the second quarter. But strong rebounding, led by Kris Humphries, allowed Boston to work their way back in, cutting the halftime deficit to two, 46-44.

The Celtics again went cold from the floor in the third quarter, making just four of their 20 shots from the field. As a result, Phoenix grabbed a 61-53 lead with 3:24 left in the third. But the Celtics again showed their resiliency, cutting to the deficit to just four, 64-60 heading into the fourth.

The Celtics continued that momentum by scoring the first nine points of the fourth quarter to cap an 11-0 run and grab a 69-64 lead, matching their biggest lead of the game.

Phoenix came back with the next six points to take a 70-69 lead. The Celtics led 78-75 before the Suns scored five straight, including the go-ahead basket, a turnaround jumper by Markeiff Morris with 2:30 left, putting Phoenix up, 80-78. Jeff Green‘s two free throws with 2:02 left tied the game again, 80-80.

After Len’s three-point play, the Celtics could not get off a shot close to the basket and the Suns put away the game with two breakaway layups.

The Celtics are off Saturday and begin a brief two-game road trip Sunday evening in New Orleans. They play in Dallas Monday night before returning home to play the Miami Heat Wednesday night at TD Garden.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Cold feet: The Celtics shot just 37.5 percent from the floor in the first half, making just 18-of-48 shots, including 2-of-12 from long range. Good defense and Phoenix sloppiness kept the Celtics in it, as Boston trailed by just two, 46-44 at the half. It didn’t get much better in the third quarter as the Celtics shot just 20 percent on 4-of-20 shooting.

Gone fishing: There are games where Brandon Bass can take over and find his shots in the paint and under the glass seemingly at will. Then there’s nights like Friday. He started but never got into a rhythm, scoring just eight points on 4-of-12 shooting, playing 21 minutes. Part of this was due to the fact that coach Brad Stevens elected to go with a smaller, three-guard lineup of Rajon Rondo, Avery Bradley and Chris Johnson for the better parts of the second and third quarters. Throw in the continued emergence of Kelly Olynyk and guards Jerryd Bayless and Phil Pressey and there was little time left for Bass.

Green-out: Like Bass, Jeff Green can look like a world-beater one game and come out with a dud the next, like Friday. He had just nine points in 36 minutes on 2-of-14 shooting.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Bradley’s back: Avery Bradley returned to game action for the first time since injuring his ankle Feb. 9 against Dallas. The team’s shutdown defender came off the bench with 3:24 left in the first quarter. With 5:09 left in the third, Bradley showed his offensive skills, getting into traffic, knocking down a 10-footer and drawing the foul for a three-point play. He finished with nine points in 17 minutes.

On the rebound: The Celtics attacked the glass with authority in the first half outrebounding the Suns, 27-24. Leading the way with six in the first half was Kris Humphries, who grabbed six of his xx for the game in the opening half. Humphries finished with his seventh double-double of the season, scoring 11 points while grabbing 13 rebounds.

Balancing the scales: The only player not to get into the scoring column in the first half was Chris Babb, the undrafted rookie out of Iowa State who was signed to his second 10-day contract on Monday. Even Joel Anthony got into the mix for the first time since playing four minutes against Golden State on March 5 and scoring two points in the first half, his first points since netting four against Atlanta on Feb. 26.

Rondo passes knee test: With about seven minutes left in the third quarter, Rondo drove to the left side of the basket for one of his patented dishes under the basket but he lost his footing, slipping to the court. His knee was protected by the black ACL brace he wears and he remained in the game and played the remainder of the third quarter with no apparent ill effects.

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

The New England Patriots finally got the message that they needed to do more to win. As you know by now, the Pats agreed to a deal with highly coveted cornerback Darrelle Revis on Wednesday, an uncharacteristic move for the organization.

Chris Babb (52) has earned a second 10-day contract with the Celtics. (AP)

Kelly Olynyk (left), Chris Babb and the rest of the Celtics won two straight before returning to their losing ways Wednesday. (AP)

The Celtics have uncharacteristically been losing all season, but they might have come to grips with another message on the night Revis was brought to New England — they need to do more to lose.

I thought Boston might have been on that path last week after a blowout loss to the Warriors, but the C’s ended up winning their next two games. Maybe this time around it will be different. Wednesday’s 24-point thumping at home at the hands of the depleted Knicks — with Rajon Rondo sitting on the Celtics bench — was nothing short of inspiring for Boston’€™s lottery odds.

Since last week’s draft piece the Celtics have gone from the fourth-worst record in the NBA to a tie for seventh worst to back into a three-way tie for fourth worst. Some, including myself, think the NBA plays too many games, the thought process being that fewer games will put more emphasis on winning in the regular season. However, this season it’s arguable that the last month of the regular season will carry significance, only much more crucial to the clear-cut lottery teams than anyone else.

The three highest lottery spots are essentially locked up at this point by the Bucks, 76ers and Magic, but the next four spots (where the Celtics figure to land) remain wide open. What’s the emphasis on winning the rest of the season? Well, the only answer seems to be “to instill a winning mentality,” as some would say. If you think the difference between winning 30 games and 25 games is going to make Jared Sullinger arrive next season feeling more confident, then you do not know the NBA.

A season like this happened right in front of our eyes in 2006-07, and look how that turned out the next year. So what’s the emphasis on losing? Well, there actually is hard evidence that this is the right move. The team that finishes with the fourth-highest lottery odds will have a 37.8 percent chance at a top-three pick and an 82.8 percent chance at selecting in the top five. The seventh-highest lottery odds only yield a 15 percent chance at a top-three pick; otherwise you pick seventh or later.

Yes, there are no guarantees in the lottery, but I ask pro-winning Celtics fans this: Would you rather miss the playoffs and own the fourth spot in the lottery, or miss the playoffs and own the seventh spot in the lottery?

With the ever-changing landscape at the bottom of the NBA, a mock draft seems almost useless. Instead, this week I will post my current big board as it stands prior to the NCAA tournament.

1. Jabari Parker, freshman, Duke – I wrote about the possibility of the Celtics stealing Parker in the draft last week, and I maintain that he is the best player in the draft (assuming he declares). Parker has been a beast all season, and he finished the regular season with perhaps his best performance. With Duke hosting rival North Carolina, Parker dropped a season-high 30 points and collected 11 boards in a 93-81 victory. He is a can’t-miss star at the next level.

2. Joel Embiid, freshman, Kansas – The big man is battling a stress fracture in his back, and it is worse than anticipated. Embiid will not play until the Sweet 16 at the earliest, and that obviously is only if Kansas is fortunate enough to make it there. This injury doesn’t change his draft stock, though. He still is very smooth on his feet for a 7-footer and possesses a growing skill set reminiscent of Hakeem Olajuwon.

3. Andrew Wiggins, freshman, Kansas – Wiggins has been a letdown overall this season, but he’s still a lock to be a top-three pick. Like Parker, he had a career day to end his regular season, only in a road loss. Wiggins poured in 41 points at West Virginia and finally showed us what it would be like to bring all that potential to life. Shooting 12-for-18 from the field and 15-for-19 from the line, Wiggins dominated all aspects of the game, pitching in eight rebounds, two assists, four blocks and five steals. I rank him third, but that game alone shows why he could be to No. 1 pick.

4. Marcus Smart, sophomore, Oklahoma State – Smart has recovered amazingly from his altercation/suspension just a few weeks ago. He is leading his team to big wins while putting up impressive numbers across the stat sheet. He still has that Derrick Rose/Russell Westbrook ceiling to his game, but even if he never reaches it, he will be a solid player. Most importantly, he returned to school to improve his maturity and 3-point shooting. He had done neither, until after his suspension. Since then, Smart has been a vocal team leader and is shooting 42 percent from downtown in his last five games. Props to Smart for the turnaround, I didn’t see it coming this full-fledged.

5. Dante Exum, Australia – Smart and Exum are really 4 and 4a in my book, but we don’t have the same access to Exum since he is overseas. Both are combo guards, Exum a bit taller at 6-foot-6 and a year younger, Smart is much stronger and explosive while possessing better experience. The teams that land them should both be happy with their drafts, but I slightly favor Smart for the time being.

6. Julius Randle, freshman, Kentucky – Randle has been slipping as the season goes on, as have the Wildcats. But he still is good for a double-double on any given night and has plenty of room to grow the rest of his game. Like Parker and Smart, Randle is physically ready to play in the NBA today.

7. Doug McDermott, senior, Creighton – They don’t call him Dougie McBuckets for nothing. McDermott had a lot to prove in his senior season in order to be a high pick in the NBA draft. He has shown me every bit of what I needed to see. The freshman class stole the headlines on the final weekend of the regular season, but it was McDermott who may have had the finest performance. Hosting Providence on senior night, McDermott went for a career high of 45 points on 17-for-25 shooting in a Creighton win. This guy can play for real.

8. Aaron Gordon, freshman, Arizona – Opposite of Randle — Gordon started off slow but has been getting more comfortable throughout the season. He is somewhat of a “tweener” in the NBA but has a good combination of speed, size and strength to play both forward positions. Once he consistently finds his jump shot, he will become a dangerous threat as a small forward. But the defensive end is where he will become a real NBA commodity; many are already predicting All-Defensive teams in his future.

9. Noah Vonleh, freshman, Indiana – The Haverhill native has been beat-up of late, sitting some games out and accumulating pedestrian numbers when he does suit up. Vonleh has a very nice inside-out game and the size to be a good NBA rebounder and defender. He is grouped with Randle and Gordon as the next three big freshman prospects after the expected top three picks. Vonleh has the least upside of the three in my opinion, though he is still a good player when healthy.

10. Tyler Ennis, freshman, Syracuse – Ennis is a true point guard and a great leader. His contributions can go beyond his numbers, he is never shaken up in any situation as a freshman, which projects very nicely at the point guard spot. Ennis has picked up his scoring of late, but ‘Cuse has been losing games. Ennis is at his best playing within the team, not being counted on to score.

Follow Julian Edlow on Twitter @julianedlow.

Blog Author: 
Julian Edlow
Jackie MacMullan discusses the Revis signing and the frustration that is Jeff Green

A 17-foot Raymond Felton jump shot 58 seconds into the game gave the Knicks a 2-0 advantage, and they never looked back, stretching the lead to 10 in the first 4:21 and ultimately handing the Celtics a 116-92 loss.

The C’s (22-43) kept pace with the Jazz, Lakers and Kings out West for the NBA’s fourth-worst record. Jeff Green‘s 27 points paced the offense, although much of his scoring came in the second half of a blowout and he added just two rebound and no assists. Kris Humphries (15 points), Jerryd Bayless (15 points) and Jared Sullinger (10 points, 8 rebounds) also reached double figures.

Meanwhile, the Knicks (26-40) moved within three games of bumping Atlanta from the eighth seed in the disastrous Eastern Conference. Carmelo Anthony led New York with 34 points and nine rebounds.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Worst first: The undermanned Celtics didn’t exactly make a defensive stand in the opening quarter. The Knicks connected on 63.6 percent of their shots — including 5-of-6 3-pointers — to to snatch a double-digit lead and seemingly put the game out of reach in the game’s first five minutes. The C’s had no answer for Anthony, who netted 13 points on 3-of-4 shooting from distance in the first quarter.

No Rondo: It doesn’t appear the Celtics point guard will make an appearance on the second night of a back-to-back this season. Since the C’s have four such contests in their final 17 games, that should be welcome news to anyone rooting for Ping Pong balls. Of course, they could have sat Rondo on the first night of the back-to-back in Indiana, but alas he sat the more winnable game on paper in front of the home crowd on Wednesday.

Hardaway got away: Would you rather have Kelly Olynyk or Tim Hardaway Jr.? The Knicks selected the Hall of Fame finalist’s son eight slots behind the Celtics, and once you throw in the two second-round picks Danny Ainge dealt to move up and grab the 7-footer, the scales probably tip in Hardaway’s favor. Especially after he submitted a a near-flawless first half against the C’s, scoring 17 points on seven shots to give New York a 68-48 lead at the break.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Hump day: While many Celtics are playing for pride at this point, Humphries is competing for his next contract. A veteran in an ever-changing role on a young squad, he’s been a steady presence in an otherwise unsteady locker room, as the rest of the acquisitions in the Nets trade are through wearing green for the rest of the season. Humphries was the only Celtics player in double figures at halftime, and his chase-down block of Hardaway in the third quarter was the stuff of legend. (Well, as much as a Kris Humphries chase-down block can be.)

Halftime speech: The Celtics could have easily thrown in the towel at the break, but they came out punching in the third quarter. Green’s personal 7-0 run sliced New York’s lead to single digits with 13 minutes to go, but the comeback was short-lived. The Knicks starter quickly reestablished a comfortable advantage.

Blog Author: 
Ben Rohrbach

Apparently, the Celtics were exactly what the Pacers needed.

After losing four straight games, Indiana (47-17), the creme of the crop in the Eastern Conference, returned to the friendly confines of Bankers Life Fieldhouse to snap its worst losing streak of the season. The Pacers (30-4 at home) outslugged Boston, 94-83, on Tuesday night. The Celtics (22-42) two-game winning streak came to an end — it was only their second winning streak since Dec. 16.

Apparently, the Celtics were exactly what the Pacers needed.

After losing four straight games, Indiana (47-17), the cream of the crop in the Eastern Conference, returned to the friendly confines of Bankers Life Fieldhouse to snap its worst losing streak of the season. The Pacers (30-4 at home) outslugged Boston, 94-83, on Tuesday night. The Celtics (22-42) two-game winning streak — it was only their second winning streak since Dec. 16 — came to a conclusion.

David West tossed in a game-high 21 points, and received help from Paul George (12 points), George Hill (12 points) and Luis Scola (11 points).

Jared Sullinger scored 13 of his team-high 17 points in the second half. Kris Humphries posted another solid game with 15 points and nine rebounds, and Chris Johnson chipped in 14 points off the bench.

WHAT WENT WRONG FOR THE CELTICS

Non-Humphries starters: Humphries got next to no help from the other four starters. Brandon Bass, Rajon Rondo, Jeff Green and Jerryd Bayless combined for 34 points, but shot a putrid 11-for-43 from the field. Rondo (4-for-15), Green (3-for-15) and Bayless (1-for-6) were the worst offenders.

Shooting: It’s next to impossible to beat the best team in the Eastern Conference shooting 36 percent. That’s exactly what Boston did on Tuesday night as it finished 32-of-89 from the floor. Additionally, the Celtics finished 3-for-18 from the 3-point line.

WHAT WENT RIGHT FOR THE CELTICS

Offensive rebounding: The Celtics mounted a second-half comeback because of their work on the offensive glass. Boston collected 19 offensive rebounds, 11 in the second half. Sullinger contributed most prominently to the cause, snagging seven rebounds of the offensive variety. In just seven first half minutes, Sullinger scored four points and grabbed two rebounds.

Humphries: Facing another dominant center (Roy Hibbert) one game after bumping down low with double-double machine Andre Drummond, Humphries again responded with a big game. Humphries followed up his 20-point, 11-rebound performance with 15 points and nine rebounds, and kept Boston’s head above water when no other Celtic was contributing offensively. Hibbert had an uncharacteristically quiet night with just six points and nine rebounds.

Johnson: Celtics’ fans infatuation with Chris Johnson has worn off. He’€™s gone from one of the stories of the year — earning two 10-day contracts as an undrafted rookie free agent — to just another average role player in the last month. But Johnson recreated a piece of that two-week magic on Tuesday, posting his first double-digit game since Jan. 9. Johnson tied a career-high with 14 points, and finished 6-for-8 from the field.

Blog Author: 
Jackson Alexander