Drew Pomeranz’s season isn’t going as he had hoped. And some of that frustration might have manifested itself in a pointed discussion with John Farrell during the Red Sox’ game against the A’s Saturday afternoon.

Drew Pomeranz’s season isn’t going as he had hoped. And some of that frustration might have manifested itself in a pointed discussion with John Farrell during the Red Sox’ game against the A’s Saturday afternoon.

Once again, Pomeranz failed to pitch deep into his start, this time lasting just four innings. With the Red Sox carrying a 3-2 lead heading into the bottom of the fifth, Farrell ended the lefty’s afternoon after 97 pitches, bringing in reliever Ben Taylor.

The decision led to what appeared to be Pomeranz confronting Farrell with his displeasure.

Pomeranz has yet to get past six innings this season, having gone four, three and four innings, respectively, in his last three outings. Since joining the Red Sox, he has gotten an out in the seventh inning just once in 21 starts.

Taylor ran into problems after replacing Pomeranz, allowing four runs on three hits while not recording an out before being replaced by Noe Ramirez.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Jackie Bradley Jr. saved the Red Sox from defeat in the bottom of the ninth with one of the best catches of the year.

There was no saving Heath Hembree in the 10th. Or the Red Sox offense, for that matter.

Mark Canha blasted a walkoff homer leading off the frame and the Red Sox wasted another 10-strikeout outing from Chris Sale in a 3-2 loss at Oakland on Friday night.

This Jackie Bradley Jr. catch would've made much more of an impact if the Red Sox had beaten the A's on Friday. (Neville E. Guard/USA Today Sports)

This Jackie Bradley Jr. catch would’ve made much more of an impact if the Red Sox had beaten the A’s on Friday. (Neville E. Guard/USA Today Sports)

Jackie Bradley Jr. saved the Red Sox from defeat in the bottom of the ninth with one of the best catches of the year.

There was no saving Heath Hembree in the 10th. Or the Red Sox offense, for that matter.

Mark Canha blasted a walkoff homer leading off the frame and the Red Sox wasted another 10-strikeout outing from Chris Sale in a 3-2 loss at Oakland on Friday night.

The game appeared over with two outs in the ninth when Ryon Healy blasted a Craig Kimbrel offering to deep center, where Bradley reached over the fence to rob him of the winning homer with a leaping catch.

This loss was on the offense. The Red Sox stranded 10 runners and wasted a prime opportunity to blow open a 2-0 lead when Trevor Plouffe made a nice play on a Hanley Ramirez smash up the third base line with two outs and the bases loaded.

The Red Sox have now lost two straight games to the A’s, who aren’t exactly the iron of the American League.

Sale did his part. Even though he wasn’t at his sharpest, he still limited the A’s to two runs on seven hits in seven innings. He struck out 10 for the eighth straight start and walked none.

Mitch Moreland gave the Red Sox all of their offense with a two-run homer in the fourth, following a Xander Bogaerts double. Moreland nearly played the hero in the ninth, but left fielder Khris Davis chased down his opposite-field liner at the foul line with two outs and Andrew Benintendi on second.

The Red Sox are now a perfectly mediocre 20-21 and their offense continues to plague them. They have not scored more than six runs in a game since May 9 and they’ve scored four or fewer in six of their last nine.

They also haven’t won or lost more than two in a row since April 18, muddying along in the middle of the American League East.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

David Price finally faced hitters on Friday, and it didn’t go smoothly.

Pitching in Buffalo for Triple-A Pawtucket, the former Cy Young Award winner was knocked out after just two innings and 65 pitches. He allowed five hits and three runs, including a homer. He walked one and struck out four.

The Red Sox had expected Price to make in the vicinity of 90 pitches, but he was lifted 25 short of that mark after allowing four hits and two runs in the second, the big blow a bloop two-run single by Jake Elmore.

Price is attempting to return from a spring training elbow injury that initially looked like it could be season-ending. Told by a pair of specialists that they would’ve recommended surgery if he were younger, Price instead opted for rest and rehab and Friday marked his first game action since March.

Red Sox manager John Farrell had expressed hope that Price could be ready to return next week after this start, but that now appears to be optimistic.

Price opened the game by allowing a leadoff double to Elmore to end a 15-pitch at-bat. He stranded him there by striking out the side. He then allowed a homer to Raffy Lopez leading off the second before two singles and a walk loaded the bases with one out. Elmore then singled to right to drive in two before Price induced a groundout and struck out Jason Leblebijian to end the frame, and his night.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase
We speak with David Ortiz, co-author of the new biography Papi: My Story with our own Michael S. Holley.

[0:00:09] ... now but coauthor of the book in the subject of the book David Ortiz joins us right now. David thanks for taking a few minutes Oreo. A boon. I ya I guess this is the second ...
[0:07:28] ... worried look on at the beginning it was those. We're talking with David Ortiz coauthor of poppy my story co written with Michael Holley. There are few athletes in recent history in the city of Boston ...
[0:10:04] ... a story. With you David where you can tell a story about Torii Hunter you're trying to Torii Hunter to come here and. Yeah. Every part of the rhetorically if they're. Excited loaned him very well. Toward commitment to train before ...
[0:21:04] ... involved and. The book is called up popping my story written by David Ortiz co written by Michael holly available in your bookstores right now. Published by Houghton Mifflin hardcourt. And I David we appreciate you taking the time to join us and it was it was a fun read I enjoyed it. Eight regular must Michael Barrett. That I may do that. He's a lot different well. I think if nothing else is there I'll play him it's as well. Where. Thanks David. I don't take thank you. That is. Future hall of Famer in my opinion David Ortiz. He'd. He denies taking steroids in eighteen different ways. Are he just the end as he said but the majority of of his being David Ortiz happened during the steroid testing here. Most of when he was David Ortiz was when there were testing came in in place in 2004. Well now he says he got cut in the steroid era but he went and help this team has had success in the right in the testing here. That's what I can't better that the testing or what I meant it when they were testing. They starting 2004. Outs and David Ortiz sort of took off where you and gets and first ballot birdied and there's enough I don't know why I don't I don't think it's the the steroids that's going to be the issue and it's the DH thing. Which I think is bogus by the way. I mean it was Frank Thomas Moore to DH or first base really well and and he got him and I was during his tires used very much ...






We speak with David Ortiz, co-author of the new biography Papi: My Story with our own Michael S. Holley.

[0:00:09] ... now but coauthor of the book in the subject of the book David Ortiz joins us right now. David thanks for taking a few minutes Oreo. A boon. I ya I guess this is the second ...
[0:07:28] ... worried look on at the beginning it was those. We're talking with David Ortiz coauthor of poppy my story co written with Michael Holley. There are few athletes in recent history in the city of Boston ...
[0:10:04] ... a story. With you David where you can tell a story about Torii Hunter you're trying to Torii Hunter to come here and. Yeah. Every part of the rhetorically if they're. Excited loaned him very well. Toward commitment to train before ...
[0:21:04] ... involved and. The book is called up popping my story written by David Ortiz co written by Michael holly available in your bookstores right now. Published by Houghton Mifflin hardcourt. And I David we appreciate you taking the time to join us and it was it was a fun read I enjoyed it. Eight regular must Michael Barrett. That I may do that. He's a lot different well. I think if nothing else is there I'll play him it's as well. Where. Thanks David. I don't take thank you. That is. Future hall of Famer in my opinion David Ortiz. He'd. He denies taking steroids in eighteen different ways. Are he just the end as he said but the majority of of his being David Ortiz happened during the steroid testing here. Most of when he was David Ortiz was when there were testing came in in place in 2004. Well now he says he got cut in the steroid era but he went and help this team has had success in the right in the testing here. That's what I can't better that the testing or what I meant it when they were testing. They starting 2004. Outs and David Ortiz sort of took off where you and gets and first ballot birdied and there's enough I don't know why I don't I don't think it's the the steroids that's going to be the issue and it's the DH thing. Which I think is bogus by the way. I mean it was Frank Thomas Moore to DH or first base really well and and he got him and I was during his tires used very much ...






With the amount of innings the bullpen has logged of late, the Red Sox were in need of a reliever so they made a roster move Friday afternoon.

The team recalled right-handed reliever Noe Ramirez and optioned left-hander Robbie Ross Jr. back to Triple-A Pawtucket.

Noe Ramirez

Noe Ramirez

With the amount of innings the bullpen has logged of late, the Red Sox were in need of a reliever so they made a roster move Friday afternoon.

The team recalled right-handed reliever Noe Ramirez and optioned left-hander Robbie Ross Jr. back to Triple-A Pawtucket.

One thought was the team would option Thursday’s starter Hector Velazquez back, but the organization likely wants to make sure David Price gets through his rehab outing Friday night.

Ramirez has gone 0-1 with two saves and a 2.53 ERA in nine appearances with the PawSox this season, recording nine strikeouts against two walks while holding opponents to a .231 batting average.

In eight games with the Red Sox this season, Ross Jr. has an ERA of 7.00.

For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Chase d'Arnaud (Bruce Kluckhohn/USA Today Sports)

Chase d’Arnaud (Bruce Kluckhohn/USA Today Sports)

Chase d’Arnaud is gone, but, at least in this corner, not forgotten.

It’s almost impossible for any player to live life on the Red Sox’ 25-man roster for even a few days without some recognition of their existence. But d’Arnaud seemed to pull it off.

He spent 22 days on the Red Sox’ 25-man roster, but appeared in just two games and got only one at-bat. It was a feat we haven’t seen before, and may never see again. In fact, there hasn’t been a Red Sox to live some sort of life in the organization and get just one at-bat since Bo Diaz in 1977.

All kind of games came and went, with nary an appearance from the player the Red Sox claimed off waivers on April 27. During that stretch, the Red Sox were out in the field for a total of 180 2/3 innings, with d’Arnaud playing exactly one of them, manning second base in the Sox’s 17-6, May 7 blowout of the Twins.

Two days after that Red Sox debut, d’Arnaud got his one and only at-bat with his new team, pinch-hitting for starter Drew Pomeranz. The righty hitter would reach via an infield single, and eventually score after running through third base coach Brian Butterfield’s stop sign.

Sure, there was no playing time. But d’Arnaud — a fourth-round pick of the Pirates in the 2008 draft — understood the deal.

“I love this team. All the guys are really cool. There are great personalities in this clubhouse that make it a lot of fun,” he told WEEI.com the day before being DFA’d.

“Pinch-running, I like to think I’m the go-to guy. And I’m happy with that. I come out and get all my work done because you never know what’s going to happen in baseball. I just work as hard as I can and be prepared as I possibly can for whatever opportunity presents itself.”

But the end ultimately came Thursday, with the Red Sox designating d’Arnaud for assignment to make room on the 25-man roster for starting pitcher Hector Velazquez.

Gone from the Red Sox clubhouse was d’Arnaud and his backpack filled with the recording equipment that he used in his downtime to record tracks for his band. (The Chase d’Arnaud band once opened in Atlanta for Lady Antebellum.)

Also gone was one of the most unique personalities this team has seen in some time.

You see, even while d’Arnaud was going through this epic streak of not playing, nobody was smiling more. In fact, he smiled so much it really was not normal. Every time anybody saw the 30 year old, he was bouncing to and fro, with a grin from ear to ear.

“It’s at the top of my priority list,” he said when asked why he was always so happy.

“It can be misconstrued of airheadedness,” d’Arnaud added. “But I can assure you it’s an intentional blocking of negativity that keeps me this way. Everything is better that way. You retain more knowledge. You have better retention when you’re happy. With dopamine flooding the brain, you’re going to perform better. I feel like it should be a priority for everybody, but it’s not.”

As it turned out, d’Arnaud has read books and articles on the practice of remaining in a good mood.

“Once you hear it makes so much sense,” he said. “So why not implement it?”

And that he did, all the way up to the moment his resolve to remain happy was tested once again. The guess is that if playing for two innings over the past three weeks isn’t going to put a dent in the philosophy, another transaction isn’t going to change things.

“A big part of what has made me successful in this role is my attitude,” he said before not playing once again in Wednesday’s 13-inning Red Sox game. “A lot of guys will want to play more. Of course everybody wants to play. It’s fun to play. But it’s important to know how to happy and have a level of acceptance where you understand your role and make the most of it. Just get along with the guys and enjoy everybody’s company, which is exactly what I’m doing.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford