FORT MYERS, Fla. — Once David Price was signed by the Red Sox, Clay Buchholz — and the rest of the members of the team’s rotation — knew something had to give.

That led to a few uneasy, early December days for the Red Sox’ pitcher, as he explained when appearing on the Bradfo Show podcast Wednesday.

“Yeah,” said Buchholz when asked if he thought he might be dealt this offseason. “Whenever you go out and get someone like David, that’s putting a lot of weight on his shoulders for reasons that are apparent. He’s the horse that every team wants to have on their staff. But given you do have someone like that, there obviously has to be one person that’s out of the mix. I was actually on the phone with Wade Miley talking about the whole Seattle thing, because my name was involved in that, and obviously his name. There were times I was unsure what was going to happen, but you can’t lose sleep over that. It’s a business and sometimes whenever an organization they have the best chance to succeed by doing one thing, and that’s what they do, you take it with a grain of salt and then you go to another team and try and help them win.

“There was a period of a week, 1 1/2 weeks, two weeks I was non-stop texting my agent, saying, ‘What’s going on?'”

As it turned out, Miley was the one dealt to Seattle, leaving Buchholz back with the Red Sox for at least one more season.

The 31 year old has a $13.5 million team option following the 2016 season, marking the second straight year he has had to pitch in a potential contract year. The real contract uncertainty began during last season, after an elbow injury shut him down in early July.

“Yeah, a little bit,” Buchholz said when asked if he ever thought his $13 million option for this season might not be picked up. “But then again, over my whole career I’ve been in the trade talks. From my first year to last year. It’s just one of those things. I’ve found a way to stick around. It goes back to me saying when I am on the field I feel like I’m as good as anybody else you can throw out there. Maybe that was the way they were leaning with it, I don’t know. I’m fortunate to be here to be a part of this organization. This is where I grew up as far as my professional career goes. I’ve got a lot of trust in them, and they’ve put a lot on me as the years have gone by. It’s one of those things.”

And now?

Buchholz said, with one option year remaining, it’s starting to feel like a whole new ballgame.

“Maybe a little bit because it is the final year of that contract so it’s more of a do-or-die type of thing and that’s why it was important to be in the gym this offseason, get the work in and try and prepare myself to the best of my capabilities and be ready,” he said of how he views this time last year to his current lot in life. “Once you get here there’s really no looking back on what you could have down, or what you should have done, or what’s going to happen. I’m looking forward to playing ball, getting on the mound and being around the guys. That’s what makes this game fun is to come out here and compete and do well at it.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — After spending Wednesday morning executing a light game of catch with Rick Porcello, Clay Buchholz sat down for an episode of the Bradfo Show podcast to catch up.

Clay Buchholz is one of the first to arrive at Red Sox camp this year. (WEEI.com photo)

Clay Buchholz is one of the first to arrive at Red Sox camp this year. (WEEI.com photo)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — After spending Wednesday morning executing a light game of catch with Rick Porcello, Clay Buchholz sat down for an episode of the Bradfo Show podcast to catch up.

As he pointed out, for about nine years running the first question in these sort of early-February interviews start with an update regarding his weight. (For what it’s worth, the right-handers frame does look a bit sturdier when we last saw him.)

The next topic? Is Buchholz going to pitch 200 innings?

The closest the 31 year old has come to the coveted milestone came in 2012, when he totaled 189 1/3 innings. But since then the totals have been 108 1/3 innings in 2013, 170 1/3 a year later, and the 113 1/3 innings he put in last season before succumbing to an elbow injury in early July.

The last couple of years coming in my body felt good. It’s been around the All-Star break where something unfortunate happens,” Buchholz said. “Given the way it was going last year, up until that point, I was one of those runs you like to be on with your starting pitcher. Go deep into games, given your team a chance to win, not give up a whole lot of home runs, making guys earn their way on base. That’s the mental side of it. You’re out there, feeling really good and then you have something set you back and you have to learn how to handle that. Over the last couple of years I’ve learned the only thing I can do about it is try and keep that from happening. That has been sort of the question mark, even for myself because there’s nobody who wants to be on the mound more than I do during a season because it really stinks sitting on the bench, especially when the team isn’t doing as good as everybody hoped for or how they thought they were going to do and you have nothing to do with it. That’s a pretty rough patch for me to not have anything to do with the team winning or losing.

“It’s just one of those things where I felt like I put myself in a good spot. As I’m getting older now I feel like there’s some switches I can make with the program we do out here and how I go about the workout routine and program. Hopefully put our heads together this year and find the ingredients for that to happen.”

The most notable “switch” Buchholz has implemented has come courtesy at least partially due the advice of one of his former teammates, Cubs pitcher John Lackey.

Buchholz is entering his time at JetBlue Park without having thrown any bullpen sessions, which is a big difference from a year ago when he came to town having four or five bullpens under his belt.

“In my mind I was thinking I was trying it a little bit different this year,” he explained. “Instead of ramping up and throwing bullpens in the offseason I’m going to get to camp around the first or second. i knew Porcello was going to be here, and I knew a couple of catchers were going to be here, too. Given our reporting date is the 18th for pitchers and catchers I can throw the same amount of bullpens being here rather than being in Texas and not being around any of the guys. I felt like this route was going to work well for me this year.

“I tried to pick a lot of guys brains. I work out with John Lackey in the offseason and he’s found his niche as far as how he goes about what he does in the offseason going into camp. We played catch for about the last month. He might throw a couple of bullpens before camp, but at this point and time he hasn’t thrown any either and he sort of eases his way into it. That was the approach I sort of thinking about taking. I talked to Johnny Farrell about it over the phone, and they were a little bit worried me coming into camp without throwing.

“Two and a half weeks from right now to throw my four or five bullpens. I can throw one every three days and it puts me on track. I can throw to Vazqy, and get reacquainted with him. I don’t feel like it’s a different route, it just started at a different time.”

The throwing program wasn’t the only change. After meeting with Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski before heading to Texas for the offseason, Buchholz received some guidelines in terms the organization’s expectations/suggestions.

“I sat down and talked to Dave before the season was over. It’s pretty much black and white what he was talking about,” Buchholz said. “When I sat down and talked to Dave it was more so of knowing what I had to do going into the offseason, taking the right amount of time off, being pretty strict on the workouts five days a week, and that’s what I did. I feel like I got stronger in a couple of different ways that I wasn’t the last couple of years. It was a good offseason for me. The one thing that was different this year is that I focused more on legs this year than I have the last four or five years. I feel like everything comes from the ground up. If my legs are in shape I don’t have to worry about my legs giving out in the first couple of bullpen. I just have to worry about arm strength, and that’s a good thing.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Clay Buchholz was the latest to arrive in camp, joining Rick Porcello, Matt Barnes and Brandon Workman in getting a quick workout Wednesday morning.

Soak it in …

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Mut and Tomase are holding things down in the studio tonight, Bradford is on assignment in Fort Myers. They talk about Rick Porcello, who is already down in Fort Myers and the strength of the pitching staff.
Mut and Tomase are holding things down in the studio tonight, Bradford is on assignment in Fort Myers. They talk about Rick Porcello, who is already down in Fort Myers and the strength of the pitching staff.

[0:02:09] ... like Jackie Bradley junior resorted there what other players that there is Hanley Ramirez there merely told us. Public's golf foxwoods February 1 to be down there putt that I did not see any. Report of ...
[0:04:59] ... went out and got. David Price arguably the best pitcher I hated Zack Greinke is there right there one and one day. Free agent pitchers they well got one of those two. And got the big ...
[0:17:37] ... They gotta have some sort of major backup plan in place for Hanley Ramirez and I don't. Right now right outs Travis Shaw effect announces major that I guess they do it it's a serviceable backup ...





Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello, one of the first arrivals to this year's camp at JetBlue Park, joins Rob Bradford in Fort Myers to talk how things have changed since first arriving with the Sox a year ago. Porcello explains how his contract negotiations played out last spring training, what went wrong last season, and an amazement Fenway Park's car parking situation.

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Jackie Bradley Jr. answers a bunch of questions through the magic of Periscope (and then celebrates by throwing a football) …

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — While there is still more than two weeks before pitchers and catchers officially report to spring training, a few members of the Red Sox choose to spend their last few days of the offseason by cutting their offseason short.

We’ve decided to do the same …

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

David Ortiz said he ready to mentor Hanley Ramirez on the art of becoming a designated hitter.</p>
<div class=