Mut and Tomase are joined by Rob Bradford to talk about just how the Red Sox were able to pull off this trade. Rob's sit down with Dave Dombrowski helps to reveal the timeline of the mega deal.
Mut and John Tomase open the Hot Stove show debating the blockbuster Chris Sale trade. Tomase argues that you can like the trade, but dislike Dombrowski for gutting the Red Sox farm system.

[0:04:08] ... like they gave up too much because they didn't. Gopac and Mike Scott Baker both be all stars want to win an MVP whatever you got Chris Sale he's the Cy Young winner. Not connect cast ...
[0:17:22] ... the all star break by Keith law. Yeah I didn't guys for Adam Eaton they Ira what happened there in Washington and they got. Jealous about all the winner some meetings talk one on to get ...
[0:20:01] ... I'm not CNN he's trading the ball well. What was that he. Andrew Miller was the centerpiece to acquire Miguel Cabrera yes right yeah that's and Miller was nothing I mean he was nothing till he ...





WEEI.com's Rob Bradford sits down with Red Sox President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski to talk about the Red Sox off season. They discuss how the blockbuster Chris Sale trade went down.

[0:01:03] ... why is because we had a general managers' meeting actually schedule from Major League Baseball serve but he had to send one player. One person for the club. To attend that meeting was at 10 o'clock in ...
[0:08:16] ... to that he said. I now need to speak with his owner Jerry Reinsdorf I had talked to our individuals with John Henry and Tom Warner the night before kind of just fill them in a where we were. Just have so they knew and ...
[0:14:00] ... decisions. And also good decisions from a development of perspective or. A Brian Bannister and his group tort and we can somebody's arm action and all of a sudden. Somebody has much greater desire for them ...





OXON HILL, Md. — The dust has settled. Dave Dombrowski and Chris Sale have both explained their experiences during the pitcher’s trade to the Red Sox. And now the question can be asked: What did the Red Sox think of the scissors incident?

OXON HILL, Md. — The dust has settled. Dave Dombrowski and Chris Sale have both explained their experiences during the pitcher’s trade to the Red Sox. And now the question can be asked: What did the Red Sox think of the scissors incident?

Dave Dombrowski is wrapping up the MLB Winter Meetings. (Geoff Burke/USA Today Sports)

Dave Dombrowski is wrapping up the MLB Winter Meetings. (Geoff Burke/USA Today Sports)

OXON HILL, Md. — The dust has settled. Dave Dombrowski and Chris Sale have both explained their experiences during the pitcher’s trade to the Red Sox. And now the question can be asked: What did the Red Sox think of the scissors incident?

The issue in question was Sale cutting up the White Sox’s throwback uniforms last season in protest of having to wear the garb during one of his starts.

So, did it concern Dombrowski at all when acquiring his new ace?

“Well, I mean, I think you do your checking when you read that and see what you feel causes some things,” Dombrowski said during his meeting with the local media at the MLB Winter Meetings Wednesday night. “But after I’ve checked things out, not really, no.”

The conversation led to how the Red Sox viewed Sale’s personality and make-up, which of course was secondary to the talent offered by the 27-year-old lefty.

“There’s always an on-field and an away from the game,” Dombrowski said. “On the field, he’s as competitive as can be. He’s got an edge to him, a good edge. His teammates love him. I mean, I’ve seen him pitch so many times in my career being in the same division. I know we never liked facing him. And off the field, actually, I’ve heard a lot of pleasant things about him. He’s expecting his second child. He told me the due date is December 20. Doesn’t know that his wife will make it until then. But he lives 20 minutes or 25 minutes away from the ballpark in Fort Myers. He lives in the Naples area.

“I’ve heard tremendous things about him as an individual. And actually, it’s amazing because again, it’s a small world, he grew up in the Lakeland area. I remember meeting his father at a ballgame at times just by coincidence in the past. Not that that tells you about the individual himself. So, I’ve had a lot of connections throughout the time period. A couple of our guys know him very well in the organization and say really good things about him.”

— Predictably, the Red Sox received a lot of calls on their starters after the Sale deal gave them seven — David Price, Rick Porcello, Eduardo Rodriguez, Drew Pomeranz, Steven Wright, Clay Buchholz and the newcomer.

Dombrowski explained that the interest from teams involved Rodriguez, Pomeranz, Wright and Buchholz, but not the top three.

“We’re just kind of sitting back at this point and kind of collecting thought processes,” he said. “But I can’t say we’re aggressively looking to doing something. We’re really more digesting what’s taking place. I think if we wanted to aggressively make a deal, we could definitely do that. but I don’t really have a big hole on our major league club to address at this time, in our opinion. So I think it’s really important to gather all the information. I think it’s also one of those where there are other conversations that have already taken place – not with our organization, between clubs. Some teams have guys available. There are some free agents out there. so I think some of that stuff, as it clears, we may find that even more clubs are aggressive. I think our philosophy, let’s just kind of see what happens. We’re not going to rush out and do anything.”

— Dombrowski was asked if he believed that the acquisition of Sale would help take the pressure off Price, the same way Porcello benefitted from the Red Sox’ investing in $217 million in another starter.

“David would be fine either way, but it’s always good for a club if they have a number of guys that they can really be top-of-the-rotation type guys that take the pressure off everybody else,” he noted. “You know everybody has a bad outing here and there, and somebody picks you up in that case. That’s helpful. If we didn’t have it, though, I’d still have the same confidence in him.”

— With the assumption that Mitch Moreland’s one-year deal will get done shortly, there isn’t much the Red Sox have to do. Dombrowski did open the door for some kind of additional movement.

“You look at your team, would you rather have a left-handed-hitting utility infielder or a right-handed-hitting utility infielder? We’ve had some discussions on those types of things,” he said. “There would be nothing of major consequence at that point. But we could address something small like that.”

— Dombrowski did talk to Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who labeled the Red Sox as the Golden State Warriors of MLB, joking with his counterpart about the psychological gamesmanship that came with the comment.

But the Red Sox’ president did warn of mustering up any kind of guarantees.

“On paper, that’s it, because you have to go do it when you’re on the field,” Dombrowski said. “I think we have a strong starting pitching staff that’s deep. We have a deep bullpen in my opinion. I think [Tyler] Thornburg is really going to help us in that regard. Quite a few people have approached me about his abilities from other clubs. They got some good players too but we really like Thornburg. We like some of those other arms we have in the bullpen. We still have a very good offensive team. We have actually a very good defensive team too, it’s athletic so I think, we led runs scored by 100 last year. I can’t predict that everyone will have the same years. David [Ortiz] is a big reason for that. But I think we still need to have a really good offensive team so we like the overall aspects of the ball club. Now we’ve got to stay healthy but I think when you put our club out there we have a chance to win.”

— Speaking of Ortiz, one question that had to be asked once again after a tongue-in-cheek Instagram post from the former designated hitter joking he might still play after the Sale acquisition: Did Dombrowski check in once again after the jocularity?

“I never ignore David Ortiz, geez why would you ever … It’s amazing how the number of people that reached out to me last night on that,” he said. “No, I don’t reach out to him because I know David well enough and I do know that if he really had sincere interest that he would call. But I also know that he has to stay on the voluntary retired list for 60 days. So there’s rules that are involved in that and I think he was just joking about something like that, I talked to him. It’s just like when I walk in the clubhouse and he’s working out, and I say, ‘Hey, you’re looking, you could play now, look at the shape you’re in.'”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

OXON HILL, Md. — It turns out the Red Sox were reaching for the stars when it came to finding their eighth-inning guy.

Wade Davis

Wade Davis

OXON HILL, Md. — It turns out the Red Sox were reaching for the stars when it came to finding their eighth-inning guy.

According to a major league source, the Sox showed strong interest in acquiring Royals closer Wade Davis before he was dealt to the Cubs Wednesday in exchange for outfielder Jorge Soler. (For more on that deal, click here.)

What derailed a deal was Kansas City’s preference of Soler over Red Sox infielder Travis Shaw, who was ultimately traded to Milwaukee with minor leaguers Mauricio Dubon and Josh Pennington for relief pitcher Tyler Thornburg.

Davis would have certainly added a unique dynamic to the back-end of the Red Sox’ bullpen, having totaled a 1.18 ERA over the last three seasons as one of the best game-enders in baseball. Davis has also been dominant during the Royals’ World Series runs, allowing just one earned run over 25 postseason innings.

The 31-year-old Davis saved 27 games for the Royals last season, and is owed $10 million in 2017, the final season of his current contract.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

OXON HILL, Md. — Rick Renteria might not be managing either Yoan Moncada or Michael Kopech to start the season, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t extremely invested in the pair.

Yoan Moncada. (Jake Roth/USA Today Sports)

Yoan Moncada. (Jake Roth/USA Today Sports)

OXON HILL, Md. — Rick Renteria might not be managing either Yoan Moncada or Michael Kopech to start the season, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t extremely invested in the pair.

The White Sox manager took a few moments at the MLB Winter Meetings Wednesday to discuss his organization’s two prize acquisitions, both of whom were included in the deal sending Chris Sale to the Red Sox.

“I’ve seen a little video of the guys,” Renteria said. “Moncada, the first clip I saw of him, he reminded me a little bit from his set up and everything of [Robinson] Cano, and now he’s a switch-hitter and shows some discipline at the plate. I know that at 21 years of age, he still has a long way to go in terms of what he’s ultimately going to be. I think he’s a very talented human being who we hope is going to be an impact-type player.

“Kopech is a young man who is about 6-foot-3, very good arm. Obviously we have people within the organization that believe that we can harness that strength and that skill set and have him become a pitcher, command the zone, things of that nature.

“But, again, our job is going to be to have these guys become as quickly — to become as comfortable as quickly as possible with the way that we are going to go about preparing to play the game, and hopefully they enjoy it.”

Renteria wouldn’t commit to which position Moncada might play, although early indications are that the White Sox plan on keeping the prospect at the position he has spent most of his time, second base.

Perhaps the most immediate correction the White Sox would like to see in Moncada’s game is cutting down on the swings a misses, which led him to finish off his big league regular season with strikeouts in nine straight plate appearances.

“I think that’s just experience,” he said. “I think it’s him — for example. I’ll give you an example. They were coming down, finishing him off underneath the hands down and in. He’s a 21-year-old man who has not seen that type of bite coming from pitchers, and it’s probably changing the lane in which he’s looking for that particular type of slider where he’s got to get it out and away.

“He also has shown discipline. He walks. It’s one of those things where I think time will tell us, but I think there’s a look to him and there’s an action to him that I believe will generate change of that particular outcome in the future.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford