Joe and Tim talk with Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts after he had another multi-hit game as the Red Sox beat the Colorado Rockies 8-3.

[0:00:03] ... inning this has been really. So consistent that way you jump that starting pitchers earlier is that a good game plan you have going. How to always be some because you fell behind McConnell the wolf ...
[0:01:57] ... or Eagles ahead and you got to just adjust to situations. Seventeen game hitting streak going on a career long for you college I'm sure industry caveat that I have to adjust during games depending on who's ...




David Price and the Red Sox cruised on Tuesday. (Greg M. Cooper-USA Today Sports)

David Price and the Red Sox cruised on Tuesday. (Greg M. Cooper-USA Today Sports)

Everything came in droves for the Red Sox Tuesday night — hits, runs, 1-2-3 innings, as they breezed through an 8-3 rout of the Colorado Rockies.

Wasting no time getting on the board, the Sox found themselves up 2-0 after four batters, with David Ortiz driving in Dustin Pedroia and Xander Bogaerts with one out in the first inning.

The haste did not just come with the scoring, either. Both Jackie Bradley Jr. (28) and Bogaerts (17) extended their respective hitting streaks in their first at-bat, while David Price struck out four of the first 12 batters he faced.

Price climbed to 7-1 and dropped his ERA from 5.53 to 5.34, giving up three runs and five hits while striking out six over seven innings.

The runs came in a variety of ways, from Mookie Betts’ second inning sacrifice fly to Christian Vazquez’s triple earlier that frame, to Chris Young’s single in the fourth.

The biggest defensive gaffe in Colorado’s one error effort led to a run, as Dustin Pedroia singled to right field in the eighth. However Carlos Gonzalez’s errant throw to third in an attempt to nab Betts went high and allowed him to score and move Pedroia to second.

Prior to the game, president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski cited a comfort in the Junichi Tazawa- Koji Uehara- Craig Kimbrel back end of the bullpen with Carson Smith out for the year, and there was some validation in that during the game. Uehara came on in the eighth and struck out three straight after allowing a single to D.J. LaMahieu.

The two teams will get back at it Wednesday night at 7:10, with Steven Wright scheduled to take on Chad Bettis.

Closing Time note

If an offensive “negative” could be found, it would be the lack of the home run for the Sox, snapping a 22-game streak of at least one long ball.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

— Jackie Bradley Jr. and Xander Bogaerts extended their hitting streaks to 28 and 17 games, respectively. Bradley’s hit brings him halfway to Joe DiMaggio’s record of 56, and six away from the Red Sox record of 34 set by Dom DiMaggio in 1949.

— David Price struck out six, bringing his league-leading season total to 76, while walking just 15.

— David Ortiz continue to climb in the record books, tying Paul Waner for 12th all-time in doubles at 604 following his fourth-inning two-bagger. Ortiz drove in four and reached base three times.

WHAT WENT WRONG

— Hanley Ramirez left the game after the bottom of the fourth with a right big toe contusion after being hit by a pitch earlier in the inning. He ran the bases the rest of the inning before being substituted out for Travis Shaw. The X-rays were negative.

— Chris Young dreadfully mistimed a dive in the second inning that enabled Gerardo Parra to triple and drive in Ryan Rayburn. Rayburn was initially called out at home after a laser cutoff throw from Xander Bogaerts, but the play was reviewed and overturned.

— Charlie Blackmon roped a home run off of David Price in the top of the third when Price hung a pitch right on the inside of the plate.

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Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

Halfway to Joltin’ Joe.

Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. extended his hitting streak to 28 games on Tuesday night with a second inning double off Jorge De La Rosa of the Rockies on the first pitch he saw.

Jackie Bradley Jr.

Jackie Bradley Jr.

Halfway to Joltin’ Joe.

Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. extended his hitting streak to 28 games on Tuesday night with a second inning double off Jorge De La Rosa of the Rockies on the first pitch he saw.

Bradley tied Wade Boggs, who hit in 28 straight in 1985, and moved within a game of Johnny Damon’s 29-gamer in 2005. Nomar Garciaparra (1997) and Hall of Famer Tris Speaker (1912) recorded 30-game streaks, while Dom DiMaggio holds the franchise record of 34, set in 1949.

Bradley came around to score on a triple by catcher Christian Vazquez as the Red Sox built a 4-1 lead after two innings.

The longest streak in baseball history belongs to Joe DiMaggio, Dom’s brother, who hit in 56 straight games in 1941.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski commented on reliever Carson Smith’s season-ending Tommy John surgery prior to Tuesday night’s game, most notably stating that the MRI from March 21 looked noticeably different than the one that sent him back to the disabled list on Friday.

Dave Dombrowski

Dave Dombrowski

Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski commented on reliever Carson Smith’s season-ending Tommy John surgery prior to Tuesday night’s game, most notably stating that the MRI from March 21 looked noticeably different than the one that sent him back to the disabled list on Friday.

“I admit that even in that MRI I can see the difference between the one’s taken in March and the one’s taken on Friday,” said Dombrowski after stating he is ordinarily not great at reading MRI’s. “I couldn’t tell you what it meant, but I could tell you that there was a significant difference.”

The average time for recovering from such surgery — which took place Tuesday afternoon — is 11-14 months.

“After the surgery, as I said, his elbow will come back stronger than ever, so hopefully he’ll be in a position where we have many years with him back pitching for the Red Sox,” Dombrowski said.

Concern was not raised in the acquisition of Smith — which involved trading away starter Wade Miley — in his unorthodox delivery, and if that appeared to be an accident waiting to happen.

“I think when you look at his delivery you say it’s an unusual delivery and it’s probably more apt to have injury. He pitched a lot of games last year and we had the medical information and we thought he’d be fine,” said Dombrowski. “I remember when we traded for Max Scherzer they said the same thing about Max Scherzer. His arm action, he’s not going to hold up, he’s never been on the disabled list since that time period.”

Carson Smith

Carson Smith

Dombrowski added that the team is not immediately looking outside of the organization for a replacement for Smith, and that given he’s appeared in just three games this season, the bullpen has fared fine without him.

“Unfortunately we haven’t really had Carson at all year long, he’s only pitched two-plus innings for us, so our bullpen right now, we’ve got the ninth, eighth and seventh pretty well set up with Craig, Koji and with Taz,” said Dombrowski. “Barnes and Hembree have both had opportunities to step up, they’ve pitched well for us and we’ll continue to see if they do that.”

He also expressed confidence from the left side of the bullpen with Robbie Ross Jr. and Tommy Layne.

There is concern with the late-inning formula, however, as Uehara is coming off a down year and is 41 years old, while Tazawa is coming off a 2015 in which he was shut down due to an extensive workload.

Dombrowski addressed that there is no such thing as a clean elbow due to the advanced ability to read an MRI. And even with the knowledge they did have, it was not enough to impede the deal from happening to bring Smith in from Seattle.

With Eduardo Rodriguez on the path to return and create a six-starter scenario, Dombrowski would not comment on if Joe Kelly could be an addition to the bullpen, but did state they would not use a six-man rotation.

Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

Travis Shaw is not in the starting lineup for the first time this season, with the third baseman sitting with a minor left hand injury. (WEEI.com’s John Tomase reported the ailment Sunday.)

Travis Shaw

Travis Shaw

Travis Shaw is not in the starting lineup for the first time this season, with the third baseman sitting with a minor left hand injury. (WEEI.com’s John Tomase reported the ailment Sunday.)

Shaw had played in all 44 of the Red Sox games, hitting .305 with a .904 OPS. Starting in his place will be Josh Rutledge.

Also getting a start against Colorado lefty Jorge De La Rosa will be Chris Young, with Christian Vazquez teaming up with Red Sox starter David Price.

Here is the Red Sox lineup in their series-opener against the Rockies:

Mookie Betts RF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Hanley Ramirez 1B
Chris Young LF
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Josh Rutledge 3B
Christian Vazquez C

For all the matchups, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Carson Smith

Carson Smith

This shouldn’t have been a surprise. Once you say “second opinion,” it automatically is safe to assume the first opinion wasn’t good. That was the case with Carson Smith.

Smith is undergoing Tommy John surgery on his right elbow Tuesday, having first had an issue with the area during a March 21 spring training game. And while he came back May 3, the fact he couldn’t bounce back — making just three appearances before going back on the 15-day disabled list — was not a good sign.

(It was a concern he actually voiced to WEEI.com’s John Tomase last week.)

Smith said in spring training that he hadn’t experienced any elbow discomfort last season in Seattle. That being the case, it was still noteworthy that the reliever’s velocity dipped somewhat the final month of last season.

Yet while the velocity was down in September, it was hard to argue with Smith’s results, with the reliever not allowing a run over his 11 appearances, striking out 19 and walking just two.

It was enough for the Red Sox to allocate a fairly significant trade chip — Wade Miley — to acquire Smith this offseason, with the Mariners’ medical reports on the reliever seemingly offering peace of mind.

But now, it hasn’t worked out. And the Red Sox are left with the same hole they thought they had filled heading into this year — a proven, lock-down, seventh- or eighth-inning reliever who can dominate right-handed hitters.

It’s not as if the cupboard is bare for the Red Sox, with Koji Uehara and Junichi Tazawa bouncing back from hiccups last season. But the whole idea was to not have to lean on these guys too much, and that’s where Smith was supposed to come in.

So, what now?

The Red Sox might have some solutions in-house. Heath Hembree has shown a very good ability to get out right-handed hitting, posting a .171 batting average against vs. righties. The problem right now is what he has done vs. left-handed hitting, which has tuned him up at a .407 clip.

Matt Barnes also has shown the potential to be a late-inning option. But the righty has to cut down on home runs and walks in order to elicit complete trust.

The Sox are hoping there might be some others emerging from Triple-A Pawtucket somewhere down the line, with Noe Ramirez having previously filled that righty-on-righty role. And while his overall numbers with the PawSox haven’t been overly-encouraging, he has controlled righties, not allowing any earned runs in 8 1/3 innings against that side of the plate.

Pat Light did hit 101 mph pitching for the PawSox recently, but he would seem to need some more consistency at Triple-A.

And then there is the trade market.

The obvious choice for any team looking for midseason, late-inning relief help will be Aroldis Chapman. There is a problem, however: he plays for the Yankees. It’s one thing for Sox and Yanks doing a deal of Stephen Drew for Kelly Johnson, and it’s another for Boston giving up legitimate players who will be helping New York beat them down the road.

There are other useful late-inning arms who are in the last year of their contracts, such as Joaquin Benoit (Seattle), Santiago Casilla (Giants), or even Jonathan Papelbon (Nationals). They are all, as you can see, playing for contending teams.

If you feel like living dangerously, familiar face Fernando Rodney is 10-for-10 in save opportunities for the Padres, having not allowed a run in his 18 appearances. (The 39-year-old has a team option for next season, as well.)

A good place to turn is to look is towards pitchers for bad teams who are dominating righty hitters. There are plenty. And one actually is tearing it up while living in the final year of his contract — Arizona’s Daniel Hudson. The 29-year-old has allowed one hit in 30 at-bats against right-handed hitters this year.

Non-free-agents-to-be include Philly’s Hector Neris, a 26-year-old who has given up two hits in 42 at-bats to righties this season. (And yes, I know, the Phillies are in the mix at the moment.) There’s a 21-year-old coming into Fenway this week with the Rockies, Miguel Castro, who has allowed a single hit in 19 ABs for righties.

We just witnessed Houston’s Pat Neshek torture Red Sox right-handers, which he has done all season. That side of the plate are 2-for-31 against the side-winder, who is also a free agent at the end of the season if the Astros don’t pick up his $6.5 million option.

Or how about Oakland’s Fernando Rodriguez, who has given up five hits in 50 right-handed at-bats this season, having also not given up a run in his five outings in one-run games.

There will be multiple ways to go for the Red Sox in their quest to replace Smith, but it’s absolutely time to start thinking about it now.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Here’s a look at the action in the Red Sox farm system Monday.

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (21-23): No game scheduled.

The PawSox will host a three-game series vs. Lehigh Valley (Phillies) starting Tuesday.

DOUBLE-A PORTLAND SEA DOGS (15-28): L, 6-5, at Harrisburg (Nationals)