It appears the Red Sox have some familiar competition for Carlos Beltran’s services.

Carlos Beltran.  (Jermone Miron/USA Today Sports)

Carlos Beltran. (Jermone Miron/USA Today Sports)

It appears the Red Sox have some familiar competition for Carlos Beltran’s source.

According to a source familiar with the negotations, four teams have currently shown the most interest in the 39-year-old outfielder/designated hitter — the Red Sox, Blue Jays, Yankees and Astros. The Rangers, once thought to be in the mix for Beltran’s services, are not involved at this point.

The Red Sox’ interest in Beltran has been prevalent since the outset of free agency, with Dave Dombrowski looking to replace David Ortiz with a shorter-term deal than the kind of four- our five-year contract Edwin Encarnacion figures to receive.

The switch-hitting Beltran is coming off another standout offensive season, totaling an .850 OPS and 29 homers in 151 games between stints with the Yankees and Texas.

Houston has been perceived as perhaps the most aggressive suitor, although both the Blue Jays have already shown the willingness to get out in front of the free agent market with the recent signing of designated hitter Kendrys Morales to a three-year deal.

And with the Yankees seemingly willing to deal Brian McCann, who would currently figure to slot into New York’s lineup as a designated hitter, Beltran could offer a logical replacement.

It is uncertain when any team might strike a deal for Beltran, with some teams, like the Red Sox, waiting to see what the luxury tax threshold will be under the new Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

It was a runaway for Terry Francona.

The Indians manager cruised to his second American League Manager of the Year award in the last four seasons, receiving 22 of 30 first-place votes. Francona last won the award in 2013.

Terry Francona

Terry Francona

It was a runaway for Terry Francona.

The Indians manager cruised to his second American League Manager of the Year award in the last four seasons, receiving 22 of 30 first-place votes. Francona last won the award in 2013.

Francona guided his team to 94 wins, claiming the American League Central Division by eight games despite the absence of top-of-the-rotation starting pitchers Carlos Carrasco and Danny Salazar down the stretch. Perhaps the Indians’ best all-around player, outfielder Michael Brantley, also played in just 11 games due to shoulder surgery.

Red Sox manager John Farrell earned two first-place votes, coming from Hal Bodley of USA Today and FanGraphs’ Eno Sarris. He also claimed three second-place votes, with nine voters putting him in third-place, putting Farrell fourth overall.

Finishing second behind Francona was Texas manager Jeff Banister (4 first-place votes), with Baltimore’s Buck Showalter placing third, also claiming two first-place votes.

Also receiving votes were the Yankees’ Joe Girardi, claiming one second-place and two third-place designations, and Scott Servais of the Mariners, who got a third-place vote from Tim Booth of the Associated Press.

In his first season as manager of the Dodgers, Dave Roberts claimed the National League Manager of the Year, earning 16 first-place votes. The Cubs’ Joe Maddon garnered eight first-place votes to finish second, while Dusty Baker of the Nationals placed third.

All voting was done prior to the postseason.

To view all the voting, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

The Opening Day closer for the last Red Sox world championship team has retired.

Joel Hanrahan announced on MLB on TuneIn that was retiring after a seven-year major league career.

For Red Sox closer Joel Hanrahan has retired. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

For Red Sox closer Joel Hanrahan has retired. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

The Opening Day closer for the last Red Sox world championship team has retired.

Joel Hanrahan announced on MLB on TuneIn that was retiring after a seven-year major league career.

The 35-year-old reliever’s stint in Boston was a short one, having pitched in just nine games with the Red Sox before succumbing to Tommy John surgery just a month into the 2013 season.

Hanrahan was slated to become the answer to the Red Sox’ late-inning issues after a 2012 season that saw Mark Melancon and Alfredo Aceves fail to thrive in the closing role. The Red Sox would deal Melancon, Stolmy Pimentel, Ivan DeJesus and Jerry Sands to the Pirates for Hanrahan and Brock Holt prior to the ’13 season.

At the time of the deal, Hanrahan was one of the game’s best closers, having saved a combined 76 games over 2011 and ’12 while making the National League All-Star team in each season.

Throwing a fastball that lived near 100 mph, the righty left an impression on Red Sox fans, blowing through the heart of an impressive Boston lineup for two straight games in Pittsburgh, July 24-25, 2011.

Hanrahan’s short career with the Red Sox started well enough, with the closer not allowing a run in any of his initial three outings. The closer’s set-up men to start the 2013 season were Koji Uehara, Andrew Miller, Andrew Bailey and Junichi Tazawa.

But he would go on to blow his final three save opportunities, ultimately pitching what would be his final major league game, May 6, 2013.

Hanrahan did sign deals with the Tigers for 2014 and ’15, but never took the mound again, even at the minor-league level.

Melancon has, of course, gone on to become one of the game’s best closers, saving 147 of his 162 chances for Pittsburgh and Washington, totaling a 1.80 ERA. The 31-year-old is due to make an enormous pay day this offseason, joining Aroldis Chapman and Kenley Jansen as the three top relievers in the open market.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

The Red Sox recognize Greg Holland might be a really good fit. But they also have come to understand there are other teams that feel the same way.

Greg Holland. (John Rieger/USA Today Sports)

Greg Holland. (John Rieger/USA Today Sports)

The Red Sox recognize Greg Holland might be a really good fit. But they also have come to understand there are other teams that feel the same way.

According to a major league source, the Red Sox are among the most aggressive suitors for the free agent relievers. There are, however, “several teams” that are showing a similar level of interest.

The Red Sox have been intrigued by the former Kansas City closer even before last Monday’s showcase, in which Holland showed good health and a fastball that sat in the low 90’s.

The plan for the 30-year-old, who underwent Tommy John surgery at the end of the 2015 season, is to not resume throwing for another five weeks.

Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski stated at the recent GM meetings that the team’s offseason priorities were to secure an eighth-inning reliever and replacement for David Ortiz, with the bullpen arm presumably coming first due to less of a financial commitment.

Because of the price tags affixed to free agent closers Mark Melancon, Aroldis Chapman and Kenley Jansen, Holland may represent the most intriguing eighth-inning option on the open market. Some of the other possibilities include Sergio Romo, Santiago Casilla, Brad Ziegler, Joaquin Benoit and Joe Blanton.

Among the teams reportedly showing interest in Holland include the Mets, Yankees, Cubs, Padres, Nationals and Mariners, although it is unclear which clubs have the same level of intent as the Red Sox.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

The Red Sox haven't seemingly targeted Edwin Encarnacion as an offseason priority. (Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports)He was the guy David Ortiz endorsed to be his heir apparent.



Of all the honors bestowed on Mookie Betts thus far, this might be the most impressive.

The second baseman-turned-outfielder was named by Wilson as the best defensive player in Major League Baseball for the 2016 season. The following is the press release announcing the honor: