Rusney Castillo probably won't see Boston this year.</p>
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bradfosho2Kate Upton’s tweets didn’t faze Rick Porcello.

That’s the message the Red Sox pitcher passed along when appearing on the Bradfo Sho podcast, talking about how how life has been since the moment he won the 2016 American League Cy Young Award.

Porcello not only describes the behind-the-scenes drama that led to his family jumping on him upon hearing the Cy Young announcement, but also the impact (or lack thereof) from Upton going on a Twitter rampage immediately after finding out her boyfriend, Justin Verlander, hadn’t won. (For more on the Upton tweets, click here.)

“Nothing really,” said Porcello when asked if there was any fallout from the Upton tweets. “I went about my day like I normally would have, regardless of what Kate had to say. Like I said that night, I was enjoying that moment with my family and I don’t think anything was going to get in the way of that. It’s a tough decision. There are three guys who are deserving of wining. But at the same time, I’m not the one who picks the award. It was one of those things where we enjoyed it and didn’t really think too much of it.

“You expect it to be emotional. When you want to win something, there’s always disappointment that’s going to set in. The reactions and that sort of stuff, I’ve always been someone who has focused on my things and my family. That’s sort of where I was at.”

Porcello also discusses other ways his life has changed since winning the Cy Young, including not being able to avoid some awkward plane conversations.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE RICK PORCELLO INTERVIEW

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello to discuss life from the moment when he learned he was the American League Cy Young Award winner until the days just before spring training. Porcello explains how things have changed for him over the past few months, while offering his thoughts on Kate Upton's controversial tweets following the Cy Young announcement, and the actual voting process.
Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello to discuss life from the moment when he learned he was the American League Cy Young Award winner until the days just before spring training. Porcello explains how things have changed for him over the past few months, while offering his thoughts on Kate Upton's controversial tweets following the Cy Young announcement, and the actual voting process.

[0:00:16] ... show. That's delicious. We ever wondered what it's like to win a Cy Young award. Why that's why when doctor Rick ports fellow the owner of the 2016. American League's Cy Young. Award in I want to ask where solo. Donnelly bow. Life since he won the award but that minute he found out. ...
[0:01:36] ... own approach he asked to take is he gonna guarantee and others Cy Young award. In the future. And just everything that goes into actually winning. Why it wasn't a war there's a lot of people ...
[0:02:19] ... imports hello. Was. This how'd you go about living life. As a Cy Young award winner so that's exactly what we talked about reports LO. On the bred for show for I believe the third time and believe and rhetoric. I don't know if you saw yours from the media probably you sensed it there was a suitcase full of at Bradford T shirts. There waiting to be if you win the Cy Young. And your other Brad throw show three times that's what you get. Yeah I'm actually and sitting. At my front porch waiting ...
[0:03:39] ... that moment if you could when you found out you won the Cy Young game and even like the moments leading up to. If you if you actually thought this happen or where you did the ...






Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello to discuss life from the moment when he learned he was the American League Cy Young Award winner until the days just before spring training. Porcello explains how things have changed for him over the past few months, while offering his thoughts on Kate Upton's controversial tweets following the Cy Young announcement, and the actual voting process.

[0:00:16] ... show. That's delicious. We ever wondered what it's like to win a Cy Young award. Why that's why when doctor Rick sports fellow the owner of the 2016. American League Cy Young. Award in I want to ask where solo. Donnelly bow. Life since he won the award but that minute he found out. The moments leading up to that and the ball went right afterward to remember. Were filled with controversy because his former teammate Justin Verlander. Her girlfriends last year on a slash supermodel Kate Upton as a derogatory things to say about. Course yellows candidacy and and ...
[0:01:36] ... own approach you guessed it today Q is he gonna guarantee another's Cy Young award. In the future. And just everything that goes into actually winning. Why it wasn't a war there's a lot of people ...
[0:02:19] ... reports LO. Was. Just how'd you go about living life. As a Cy Young award winner so that's exactly what we talked about reports LO. On the bred for show for I believe the third time and believe and rhetoric. I don't know if you saw yours from the media probably you sensed it there was a suitcase full of at Bradford T shirts. There waiting to be had if you win the Cy Young. And your other Brad throw show three times that's when you get. Yeah I'm actually and sitting. At my front porch waiting ...
[0:03:39] ... that moment if you could when you found out you won the Cy Young game and even like the moments leading up to. If you if you actually thought this happened or where you did the. ...






Tragedy struck the baseball world early Sunday morning.

According to multiple reports, a pair of car crashes in the Dominican Republic early Sunday morning took the lives for Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura and former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte. The two were reportedly separate incidents.

Tragedy struck the baseball world early Sunday morning.

According to multiple reports, a pair of car crashes in the Dominican Republic early Sunday morning took the lives for Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura and former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte. The two were reportedly separate incidents.

Ventura was considered one of the most promising young starting pitchers in the American League, going 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts with the Royals in 2016. The 25-year-old went 14-10 with a 3.52 ERA in 2014, and 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA the following season.

The right carried one of the best fastballs in the league, ranking second in the majors in 2014 for hardest average heater among MLB starters. His performance in 2014 resulted in the Royals signing him to a five-year, $23 million extension.

Marte, who was 33 years old, never played for the Red Sox, but was part of one of the organization’s most memorable trades in recent years.

Prior to the 2006 season, the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox from the Braves in exchange for shortstop Edgar Renteria. At the time Marte was considered the ninth-best prospect in baseball, and immediately became the Red Sox’ top minor-leaguer.

Just more than a month later, however, Marte would be dealt by the Red Sox to the Indians in a trade that brought back Coco Crisp. He would go on to 308 major league games with Atlanta, Cleveland and Arizona, emerging in the big leagues for the last time in 2014 with the Diamondbacks.

Marte played for KT Wiz of the Korean Baseball League in 2016, and was in the midst of participating in the Dominican Winter League this offseason.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Still dreaming of David Ortiz rejoining the Red Sox? Perhaps this will make you feel better — Pedro Martinez believes it’s going to happen.

Pedro Martinez

Pedro Martinez

Still dreaming of David Ortiz rejoining the Red Sox? Perhaps this will make you feel better — Pedro Martinez believes it’s going to happen.

Speaking on the Trenni & Tomase program on Saturday from Foxwoods, where the Red Sox were holding their Winter Weekend, Martinez made it clear that he’s 100 percent skeptical of Ortiz’s decision to retire, and believes it’s only a matter of time before he laces up his cleats again.

“David says he’s retired,” Martinez said. “But I still believe David is going to give it another try. I don’t know why I have that feeling that David might want to do that. I just don’t see David, having the type of season that he had, and having the success that he was still having, sitting at home wasting it. David is too smart. I still believe David is going to feel the little itch of coming back to spring training.”

What gives Martinez such confidence in this bold prediction, which flies in the face of literally everything Ortiz has said since announcing his retirement before last season?

“Because imagine, I’m one of his closest friends,” Martinez said. “And I’m going to have to come to spring training, so he’s going to be left in the Dominican alone. I know that he needs some time off. If he stays at home with his wife, his kids, it’s going to get boring sooner or later, and I believe he’s going to come over.

“I think the toughest thing is going to be when he finds himself with so much time, and not having a regimen to follow,” Martinez added. “That’s going to be really difficult for David, a man that’s used to swinging the bat 500 times a day, mingling with his friends and teammates and all that. It’s just going to be difficult.”

Martinez knows how hard it is to walk away. He retired after pitching in the 2009 World Series for the Phillies and was a first-ballot Hall of Famer five years later.

“[Ortiz] always laughs when I tell him that comfy is not that simple,” Martinez said. “To just sit at home and see every other player, every other friend you have go away, and then you’re sitting at home and not having something to do, it’s really difficult to deal with.”

So what Martinez is saying is there’s a chance, then? He’s not closing the door on Big Papi pulling on No. 34 again?

“No. No, I’m not,” he said. “And I won’t. Until the year goes by, I won’t.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — David Price has been the topic of conversation in Boston over the last week, and it has little to do with his pitching.