NEW YORK — It would have been a nice story.

The idea that David Ortiz might play baseball one more time after retiring this season, as a member of the Dominican Republic’s World Baseball Classic team, had been muttered before. But when meeting with the media prior to the Red Sox’ game against the Yankees Tuesday night, Ortiz put that notion to rest.

David Ortiz

David Ortiz

NEW YORK — It would have been a nice story.

The idea that David Ortiz might play baseball one more time after retiring this season, as a member of the Dominican Republic’s World Baseball Classic team, had been muttered before. But when meeting with the media prior to the Red Sox’ game against the Yankees Tuesday night, Ortiz put that notion to rest.

“I’d probably need 15 months to recover,” he said. “I would love to represent my country, but like I say, I’m in a situation where I’m trying every day to get ready to play a game. My body is so happy. My body is counting the days. It’s hard to play baseball when you’re 40. It’s something that, especially when you’re looking around and everybody is 20. You can be a dad. When you look around baseball, everyone is 20. Everything is moving pretty fast.

“The thing that people don’t understand is that baseball, if you want to be successful and you want to be able to do what we did in the last one, you’ve got to be playing. You can’t just come out of the box and be like, ‘Hey, I’m here. Can I play just because I’m a big name?’ It doesn’t work that way. I have been part of Baseball Classics before and it hasn’t been that well. When we had guys who were playing winter ball and ready to go, that’s all about timing and being ready to go. Big names, we train and then we play. When you don’t train and you’re not seeing pitches and then you go play, the results are not the ones that you expect. We have a lot of good players, good young players. I know they’re going to do really well. If I can do anything on the other side for the Dominican ball club, by that time if I’m able to I’ll probably do something, but I don’t think I’m going to be able to play.”

Ortiz played in the WBC, which will be held once again next March, in 2006 and 2009, skipping 2013 due to his heel/foot injury.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

NEW YORK — This wasn’t exactly how the Red Sox envisioned Drew Pomeranz’ status at this point in a pennant race.

John Farrell announced prior to Tuesday night’s game against the Yankees that Pomeranz would not be making his scheduled start Thursday due to both a sore left forearm, and having totaled more innings that any point in his career (169 1/3 innings).

Drew Pomeranz

Drew Pomeranz

NEW YORK — This wasn’t exactly how the Red Sox envisioned Drew Pomeranz’ status at this point in a pennant race.

John Farrell announced prior to Tuesday night’s game against the Yankees that Pomeranz would not be making his scheduled start Thursday due to both a sore left forearm, and having totaled more innings that any point in his career (169 1/3 innings).

Because of the combination of the two, if Pomeranz pitches again this season it will be as a reliever. Henry Owens will be making the Thursday start for the Red Sox.

“He’s come out of his last start a little more sore,” Farrell said. “There’s been additional need for recovery time. The total number of innings pitched. There’s been a combination of factors. He is not shut down, but he is not starting Thursday. We need to get him on a mound hopefully by the end of the week to determine a bullpen role going forward.”

Pomeranz has struggled in his last three starts, totaling an 8.44 ERA over just 10 2/3 innings. Since joining the Red Sox in a July trade which sent top pitching prospect Anderson Espinoza to San Diego, the lefty has gone 3-5 with a 4.68 ERA.

“You always put the player’s health at the forefront,” Farrell said. “Is there an increased risk at a higher number of innings, the innings he’s totaling with the need for added recovery time? You factor those in. This is independent of the standings.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

David Ortiz has made a lot of stops on this retirement tour. But the one road series he admittedly is most sentimental about is the final regular season stop for the Red Sox, against the Yankees in the Bronx.

David Ortiz wants to make it clear how special Yankee Stadium is to him. (Anthony Gruppuso/USA Today Sports)

David Ortiz wants to make it clear how special Yankee Stadium is to him. (Anthony Gruppuso/USA Today Sports)

David Ortiz has made a lot of stops on this retirement tour. But the one road series he admittedly is most sentimental about is the final regular season stop for the Red Sox, against the Yankees in the Bronx.

It is why Ortiz took to the Player’s Tribune to pen a farewell letter to Yankees fans, entitled, “Thanks for the memories, New York.”

Within the article, Ortiz expresses his feelings toward the Yankees organization and their fans:

– Regarding the notion that Yankees fans might moon him during this three-game series, Ortiz writes,

“Let me tell you something. If 50,000 people moon me, I promise you two things. … First, I’m gonna laugh so hard I might start crying. … Then when the tears dry, I’m gonna step up to the plate and try to hit the ball all the way to the choo choo train. You gotta be careful. You guys don’t have Mariano no more, you know what I’m saying?

“Listen, Yankee fans. I gotta admit something to you. And I’m serious about this. I got love for you.

“It’s just a little bit of love, but I do.”

– Ortiz talks about his admiration for past Yankees, particularly Derek Jeter.

“When I came to this country and I was trying to make it to the big leagues, I looked at guys like Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera, and I was almost in awe. When I got to play against the Yankees my first few years, I would watch some of the things Jeter would do in the field like I was just a fan.

“I learned a lot from watching DJ. I never got to tell him that when he was playing, but I did. The way he handled his business, and how much respect he had for this game, it made me want to be a better player.

“For real, I looked forward to hitting doubles against the Yankees so I could get to second base and say what’s up to DJ.”

– The Red Sox designated hitter also touches on how special it has been to play in Yankee Stadium, against teh Yankees.

I know some people who grew up their whole lives here take it for granted because they’re used to it, but for my family, America is still like a dream. I don’t ever forget how lucky I am to be given this opportunity.

That’s why every time I get to play in Yankee Stadium, it’s just a different level.

“When I’m standing in the on-deck circle and I hear all those boos, I get this feeling I can’t even describe. I’m so focused. My adrenaline goes through the roof. I’m totally locked in. The intensity is just not the same against another team.

“Some players are born to be Yankees, you know what I’m saying?

“I was born to play against the Yankees.”

To read the entire article, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Fans are talking about the possibility, so why not the players.

Appearing on the Bradfo Show podcast, Cubs catcher David Ross isn’t hesitant to admit that the idea of meeting his former club, the Red Sox, in the World Series has been the topic of conversation among at least a portion of the Wrigley Field home clubhouse.

David Ross (WEEI.com)

David Ross (WEEI.com)

Fans are talking about the possibility, so why not the players.

Appearing on the Bradfo Show podcast, Cubs catcher David Ross isn’t hesitant to admit that the idea of meeting his former club, the Red Sox, in the World Series has been the topic of conversation among at least a portion of the Wrigley Field home clubhouse.

“This season has been a dream come true for me in so many ways, but to end it playing the Red Sox, that would be the storybook,” Ross said. “I love all those guys. I’m rooting those guys on all the time. I’m in constant contact with a bunch of those guys, coaches included. I miss those guys. I’m always pulling for them. Getting me and David in the World Series would be pretty neat.

“For sure, because we’re always following it. We have such a connection with the city and the organization, that comes up all the time. We’re talking about David and what he’s doing and what is going on there and all the success that’s happening in Boston. Heck yeah, we’ve talked about it. I think the storybook is the Red Sox and Cubs. Two of the oldest franchises in the game. The two best stadiums, in my opinion, in all of baseball. We think about it all the time. If that’s the goal there wouldn’t be a better place to be than Boston and Chicago.”

Heading into Tuesday, the Red Sox and Cubs owned the best records in their respective leagues, with Chicago having already clinched the National League’s best record with a 100-56 mark. The Red Sox are 1/2-game up on Texas for the top mark in the American League at 92-64.

The Cubs, of course, are littered with players, coaches and members of the front office who are tied to the Red Sox organization, with Ross joining fellow Cubs Jon Lester, John Lackey, Anthony Rizzo, Tim Federowicz, Eric Hinske, Darnell McDonald among those who had previously worn a Red Sox uniform but now call Chicago home.

Speaking of Lester, Ross had high praise for the Cubs’ lefty.

Lester has totaled a 19-4 record and 2.28 ERA this season, with the Cubs going 24-7 in his starts. In his last eight starts, he has a 0.64 ERA, allowing just four runs in 56 1/3 innings.

“I would say he’s at that spot where he was rolling in Boston,” the catcher said. “He was rolling before we went into the playoffs in ’13 and kept on rolling and dominated just about every outing when he toed the rubber. That’s where he’s at right now. He’s very, very good. He’s got more pitches. He can do more with the baseball, so he’s a more complete pitcher. I would say he dominates the game the same way. I would say he’s better than he was there as far as the complete pitcher goes.”

Among some of the other topics discussed by Ross on the podcast are his retirement tour this season, and the unique tribute given by Cubs manager Joe Maddon Sunday night.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
David Price

David Price

With their magic number to clinch the AL East at one, the Red Sox head to Yankee Stadium to open a three-game series. David Price will take the ball for Boston, while the Yankees will counter with rookie Luis Cessa.

Price is 17-8 with a 3.91 ERA and a 1.175 WHIP in 33 starts. In his last start on Thursday, the southpaw threw seven innings, allowing three runs, six hits and two walks with five strikeouts in a 5-3 win over the Orioles.

“This is the time of year you want your team to get on a roll in the way we have,” Price said (via MLB.com). “That’s what we’ve done and just continued to bring the same attitude to the field every day.”

Price is 14-9 with a 4.44 ERA and a 1.344 WHIP in 35 career games (34 starts) against the Yankees. In four starts this year against New York he is 1-2 with a 7.71 ERA and a 1.714 WHIP. Price last saw the Yankees on Sept. 17. He went six innings, allowing five runs, nine hits and no walks with seven strikeouts in a 6-5 Sox win.

Luis Cessa

Luis Cessa

Cessa is 4-3 with a 4.30 ERA and a 1.142 WHIP in 15 games (seven starts). The right-hander was recalled from Triple-A in early August and made his first career start on Aug. 20. In his last start on Thursday he threw six innings, allowing two runs, six hits and two walks with six strikeouts in a 2-0 loss to the Rays. One of the two runs that Cessa surrendered was a solo home run in the sixth inning. In 58 2/3 innings of work, he has given up 15 home runs.

“He gave up two runs in six innings; most of those games, we’re going to win,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said (via MLB.com). “I thought he pitched a really good game tonight. The first run, it was questionable if that should have scored. He was not the problem. We didn’t score any runs; that was the problem.”

Against the Sox, Cessa is 1-1 with a 3.86 ERA and a 0.857 WHIP in two games (one start). The 24-year-old native of Mexico last saw Boston on Sept. 16. In that start, he went five innings, allowing three runs, six hits and no walks with one strikeout in a 7-4 Sox win.

Red Sox vs. Cessa (RHP)

Xander Bogaerts is 0-for-3 with 1 strikeout.

Dustin Pedroia is 1-for-4.

Jackie Bradley Jr. is 0-for-3.

David Ortiz is 1-for-3 with 1 RBI and 2 strikeouts.

Travis Shaw is 1-for-3 with 1 double.

Mookie Betts is 1-for-2.

Sandy Leon is 0-for-2.

Hanley Ramirez is 2-for-2 with 1 home run and 2 RBIs.

Chris Young is 0-for-2.

Aaron Hill is 0-for-1.

Yankees vs. Price (LHP)

Jacoby Ellsbury (78 plate appearances): .342 AVG./.385 OBP/.521 SLG, 6 doubles, 2 triples, 1 home run, 6 RBIs, 3 walks, 6 strikeouts

Mark Teixeira (77): .214/.286/.386, 3 doubles, 3 home runs, 9 RBIs, 6 walks, 10 strikeouts

Brett Gardner (51): .220/.327/.268, 1 triple, 4 RBIs, 7 walks, 8 strikeouts

Chase Headley (31): .367/.387/.500, 2 doubles, 1 triple, 3 RBIs, 1 walk, 6 strikeouts

Brian McCann (30): .345/.367/.655, 3 home runs, 7 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

Aaron Hicks (21): .278/.381/.389, 2 doubles, 3 walks, 6 strikeouts

Didi Gregorius (20): .444/.474/.556, 2 doubles, 4 RBIs, 1 walk, 2 strikeouts

Billy Butler (19): .250/.316/.250, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 1 strikeout

Austin Romine (13): .364/.417/.545, 2 doubles, 5 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

Starlin Castro (12): .455/.500/.636, 2 doubles, 1 RBI, 1 walk, 1 strikeout

Rob Refsnyder is 0-for-6 with 4 strikeouts.

Eric Young is 2-for-4.

Gary Sanchez is 1-for-3 with 1 home run, 2 RBIs and 1 strikeout.

Donovan Solano is 1-for-3 with 1 home run, 3 RBIs and 2 strikeouts.

Ronald Torreyes is 1-for-3.

Blog Author: 
John Hand
Rob Bradford is joined by former Red Sox, and current Cubs, catcher David Ross, who admits to joining teammates Jon Lester, John Lackey and many members of the Chicago front office in at least contemplating the idea of a Red Sox vs. Cubs World Series. Ross also compares his retirement tour to David Ortiz's, reveals stories of clubhouse celebrations, while suggesting that Lester is pitching better than ever.

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