Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello to discuss life from the moment when he learned he was the American League Cy Young Award winner until the days just before spring training. Porcello explains how things have changed for him over the past few months, while offering his thoughts on Kate Upton's controversial tweets following the Cy Young announcement, and the actual voting process.
Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox pitcher Rick Porcello to discuss life from the moment when he learned he was the American League Cy Young Award winner until the days just before spring training. Porcello explains how things have changed for him over the past few months, while offering his thoughts on Kate Upton's controversial tweets following the Cy Young announcement, and the actual voting process.

[0:00:16] ... show. That's delicious. We ever wondered what it's like to win a Cy Young award. Why that's why when doctor Rick ports fellow the owner of the 2016. American League's Cy Young. Award in I want to ask where solo. Donnelly bow. Life since he won the award but that minute he found out. ...
[0:01:36] ... own approach he asked to take is he gonna guarantee and others Cy Young award. In the future. And just everything that goes into actually winning. Why it wasn't a war there's a lot of people ...
[0:02:19] ... imports hello. Was. This how'd you go about living life. As a Cy Young award winner so that's exactly what we talked about reports LO. On the bred for show for I believe the third time and believe and rhetoric. I don't know if you saw yours from the media probably you sensed it there was a suitcase full of at Bradford T shirts. There waiting to be if you win the Cy Young. And your other Brad throw show three times that's what you get. Yeah I'm actually and sitting. At my front porch waiting ...
[0:03:39] ... that moment if you could when you found out you won the Cy Young game and even like the moments leading up to. If you if you actually thought this happen or where you did the ...






Tragedy struck the baseball world early Sunday morning.

According to multiple reports, a pair of car crashes in the Dominican Republic early Sunday morning took the lives for Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura and former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte. The two were reportedly separate incidents.

Tragedy struck the baseball world early Sunday morning.

According to multiple reports, a pair of car crashes in the Dominican Republic early Sunday morning took the lives for Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura and former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte. The two were reportedly separate incidents.

Ventura was considered one of the most promising young starting pitchers in the American League, going 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts with the Royals in 2016. The 25-year-old went 14-10 with a 3.52 ERA in 2014, and 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA the following season.

The right carried one of the best fastballs in the league, ranking second in the majors in 2014 for hardest average heater among MLB starters. His performance in 2014 resulted in the Royals signing him to a five-year, $23 million extension.

Marte, who was 33 years old, never played for the Red Sox, but was part of one of the organization’s most memorable trades in recent years.

Prior to the 2006 season, the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox from the Braves in exchange for shortstop Edgar Renteria. At the time Marte was considered the ninth-best prospect in baseball, and immediately became the Red Sox’ top minor-leaguer.

Just more than a month later, however, Marte would be dealt by the Red Sox to the Indians in a trade that brought back Coco Crisp. He would go on to 308 major league games with Atlanta, Cleveland and Arizona, emerging in the big leagues for the last time in 2014 with the Diamondbacks.

Marte played for KT Wiz of the Korean Baseball League in 2016, and was in the midst of participating in the Dominican Winter League this offseason.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Still dreaming of David Ortiz rejoining the Red Sox? Perhaps this will make you feel better — Pedro Martinez believes it’s going to happen.

Pedro Martinez

Pedro Martinez

Still dreaming of David Ortiz rejoining the Red Sox? Perhaps this will make you feel better — Pedro Martinez believes it’s going to happen.

Speaking on the Trenni & Tomase program on Saturday from Foxwoods, where the Red Sox were holding their Winter Weekend, Martinez made it clear that he’s 100 percent skeptical of Ortiz’s decision to retire, and believes it’s only a matter of time before he laces up his cleats again.

“David says he’s retired,” Martinez said. “But I still believe David is going to give it another try. I don’t know why I have that feeling that David might want to do that. I just don’t see David, having the type of season that he had, and having the success that he was still having, sitting at home wasting it. David is too smart. I still believe David is going to feel the little itch of coming back to spring training.”

What gives Martinez such confidence in this bold prediction, which flies in the face of literally everything Ortiz has said since announcing his retirement before last season?

“Because imagine, I’m one of his closest friends,” Martinez said. “And I’m going to have to come to spring training, so he’s going to be left in the Dominican alone. I know that he needs some time off. If he stays at home with his wife, his kids, it’s going to get boring sooner or later, and I believe he’s going to come over.

“I think the toughest thing is going to be when he finds himself with so much time, and not having a regimen to follow,” Martinez added. “That’s going to be really difficult for David, a man that’s used to swinging the bat 500 times a day, mingling with his friends and teammates and all that. It’s just going to be difficult.”

Martinez knows how hard it is to walk away. He retired after pitching in the 2009 World Series for the Phillies and was a first-ballot Hall of Famer five years later.

“[Ortiz] always laughs when I tell him that comfy is not that simple,” Martinez said. “To just sit at home and see every other player, every other friend you have go away, and then you’re sitting at home and not having something to do, it’s really difficult to deal with.”

So what Martinez is saying is there’s a chance, then? He’s not closing the door on Big Papi pulling on No. 34 again?

“No. No, I’m not,” he said. “And I won’t. Until the year goes by, I won’t.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — David Price has been the topic of conversation in Boston over the last week, and it has little to do with his pitching.

David Price. (NIck Churiaro/USA Today Sports)

David Price. (NIck Churiaro/USA Today Sports)

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — David Price has been the topic of conversation in Boston over the last week, and it has little to do with his pitching. The buzz around the Red Sox’ pitcher has solely been due to comments he made to the Boston Globe recently about hearing racist comments thrown his way while in the Fenway Park bullpen.

Appearing on the Trenni & Tomase Show from the Red Sox’ Winter Weekend at Foxwoods Saturday, Price elaborated on the topic.

“I was raised to not see anybody different than myself, stuff like that. For me, it’s different. I think it got taken a little bit out of context, the way that I said it. I enjoy being in Boston,” Price said. “As tough as it was, I can only imagine having the year that Porc had, seeing the support that he poured into on a day to day basis. For me, that’s what it’s all about. I understood it was a very tough place to pitch and to play. I welcome that. That’s something that I want. That’s not to prove anybody wrong. I want to prove myself right. I know I’m capable of doing this. We have the zero-tolerance in the dugout, and out in the bullpen. All the guys reached out to me. Sam Kennedy, Dave and Kevin, all of them. It was something we talked about. It stinks that it happens, but I’ve heard it my entire life. It’s something that I heard. It’s not something that bothers me. I’m not going to let their ignorance slow me down or be an obstacle in my way. That’s just the way that I’ve been raised. I’m immune to it.”

When asked if he did, indeed, experience the kind of derogatory verbiage mentioned, Price said, “It can be a tough place to play. I’ve experienced it on the other side, sitting in the third base dugout. They love this team. I like that. I really do like that. People can have a little bit too much fun sometimes, whether it’s having too much to drink or whatever it is. To me, I don’t worry about it. I’m having my child in Boston. I’m going to raise him for however long I’m in Boston. That’s where he’s going to be. I love the city of Boston. I like the people here. Everything. I don’t think it speaks for the entire city.”

Price did say, however, the talk didn’t have an effect on him at the time he experienced it.

“I don’t really think I had a reaction to it,” he noted. “It’s not something I think about. I heard it all at a very young age. Kids say a lot of silly stuff to other kids. I’ve heard it. I don’t think it’s going to happen anymore. I plan on dominating for the next six years and it’s only going to be positivity coming out of everybody’s mouths.”

TO LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE DAVID PRICE INTERVIEW, CLICK HERE

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — Whatever David Price heard in Fenway Park last season, owners John Henry and Tom Werner insist they’ll do everything in their power to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

Tom Werner

Tom Werner

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — Whatever David Price heard in Fenway Park last season, owners John Henry and Tom Werner insist they’ll do everything in their power to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

Price told the Boston Globe last week that he heard racist taunts at Fenway last year, though he didn’t make it sound like a common occurrence. Speaking at Foxwoods before the team kicked off its Winter Weekend on Friday night, the owners expressed their dismay.

“I heard about this,” Werner said. “We haven’t talked to David, but we have a zero-tolerance policy for that kind of behavior. If we hear that somebody is taunting somebody, then he’ll be ejected from Fenway Park. As somebody who feels very strongly about this, there’s no grey area here. If this was happening with David, and I know he modified his remarks afterward and said this was something that happened to him as well previously, but there’s no behavior like that that will be tolerated.”

The owners also touched on a couple of other topics.

— On the belief that trading prospects has created a three-year window:

“I don’t think that has changed a lot since we first arrived,” Henry said. “This should be a very strong team for the next three years. There’s no way we could’ve signed every young player we have. We have so many. I think we’re good for the next three years. Beyond that, we have a terrific general manager and terrific resources, thanks to our fans. You have to feel good about this club.”

— On bringing David Ortiz out of retirement, which isn’t happening:

“He has not indicated that that’s of interest to him,” Werner said. “He knows that we’d love to figure out some way for him to be an important part of the organization going forward. We’re going to be seeing him next week [in the Dominican Republic] and beyond that, I think he’s having a good time in his offseason. I think he’s learning how to play tennis.”

— On signing Mookie Betts and/or Xander Bogaerts to contract extensions:

“It is important, but it takes two,” Henry said. “We’ll do everything we can.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase