The Red Sox continue their four-game series against the Blue Jays in Toronto on Wednesday when Clay Buchholz opposes R.A. Dickey.

Buchholz (5-5, 5.46 ERA) wasn’t at his best in his latest outing last Friday, but he was effective enough to lead the Red Sox to a 5-4 win over the Royals. The right-hander gave up four runs, scattered 10 hits and had three strikeouts over six innings for the win. According to MLB.com, he’s the first Sox starting pitcher to win the last two games the Red Sox have played since Don Schwall in 1961.

“I gave up some loud outs and some loud hits for the first couple of innings, but that’s another team that swings the bat, and they put some balls in play that found some holes and led to a couple of runs,” Buchholz said after the game.

Buchholz is 3-1 with a 3.28 ERA since returning from the disabled list June 25. He’s allowed just one walk to 26 strikeouts in his last five starts.

Buchholz will try to keep this stretch going strong against a Blue Jays team he’s had mixed results against in 2014. He’s 1-1 against Toronto this season, giving up eight runs in 11 2/3 innings.

Buchholz’s last start against the Jays was especially brief. He lasted just 4 2/3 innings at Fenway Park on May 21. He gave up five runs (four earned), nine hits and two walks in a 6-4 Red Sox loss. Buchholz is 10-6 with a 2.71 ERA against the Blue Jays.

After three straight quality starts, Dickey (7-10, 3.95 ERA) struggled in his first outing since the All-Star break last Friday. He gave up five runs on six hits and two home runs over six innings in a 5-1 loss to the Rangers.

Dickey has lost six of his last seven starts. Recently, it’s been thanks in large part to a lack of run support. The Blue Jays have scored just two runs for the righty in his last two starts.

Dickey’s lone start against the Sox was one of his better outings this season. He allowed just one run on five hits with no walks and six strikeouts over 6 1/2 innings in a 7-1 win April 27. Dickey is 3-3 with a 4.85 ERA in six starts and 12 total games against the Sox in his career.

R.A. Dickey

R.A. Dickey

Red Sox vs. Dickey (RHP)

Shane Victorino (27 plate appearances): .240 AVG/.296 OBP/.440 SLG, 1 HR, 2 doubles, 3 RBIs, 2 walks, 9 strikeouts

Dustin Pedroia (16): .133/.188/.133, 1 RBI, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

David Ortiz (14): .333/.429/.750, 1 HR, 2 doubles, 2 RBIs, 2 walks, 4 strikeouts

Mike Napoli (12): .364/.417/.545, 2 doubles, 3 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

Stephen Drew (10): .333/.400/.444, 1 double, 1 walk

Jackie Bradley (8): .286/.375/.714, 1 HR, 4 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

David Ross (7): .143/.143/.143, 1 strikeout

Daniel Nava (6): .200/.167/.200, 1 RBI, 1 strikeout

Jonny Gomes (5): .200/.200/.200

Xander Bogaerts (3): .667/.667/1.000, 1 double, 1 strikeout

Mike Carp (3): .000/.000/.000, 2 strikeouts

Brock Holt got a hit in his only plate appearance.

Blue Jays vs. Buchholz (RHP)

Jose Bautista (43 plate appearances): .289 AVG/.349 OBP/.395 SLG, 1 HR, 1 double, 3 RBIs, 4 walks, 11 strikeouts

Melky Cabrera (23): .238/.304/.238, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 3 strikeouts

Colby Rasmus (17): .154/.313/.154, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 2 strikeouts

Jose Reyes (16): .357/.438/.500, 1 triple, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 1 strikeout

Anthony Gose (11): .300/.364/.300, 1 walk, 1 strikeout

Dioner Navarro (9): .500/.364/.500, 2 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

Munenori Kawasaki (8): .125/.125/.125, 1 strikeout

Juan Francisco (6): .000/.333/.000, 2 walks, 1 strikeout

Dan Johnson (3): .000/.000/.000, 2 strikeouts

Darin Mastroianni (3): .333/.333/.667, 1 double, 1 strikeout

Blog Author: 
Nick Canelas

Based on the most recent version of the 2015 schedule, the Red Sox will open next season April 6 against the Phillies in Philadelphia followed by a three-game series at Yankee Stadium before playing the Nationals in the home opener April 13, according to an ESPNBoston report.

Based on the most recent version of the 2015 schedule, the Red Sox will open next season April 6 against the Phillies in Philadelphia followed by a three-game series at Yankee Stadium before playing the Nationals in the home opener April 13, according to an ESPNBoston report.

The schedule is being reviewed by all major league teams and could be revised.

The Red Sox will play all National League East teams, squaring off against the Braves in back-to-back two-game series in Boston and Atlanta in June, hosting the Marlins in July then playing in Miami in August, and visiting the Mets in late August. The last interleague series would be against the Phillies at Fenway in early September.

The Orioles are scheduled to play at Fenway for the annual Patriots’ Day game. The Yankees‘ first visit to Fenway is May 1-3. The Sox close the season Oct. 4 against the Indians in Cleveland.

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar

Jake Peavy says his focus is on the Red Sox despite continuing trade rumors. (AP)TORONTO -- Jake Peavy wanted this to work. The Red Sox wanted this to work.



ROB BRADFORD

BIO | ARCHIVE | FULL COUNT BLOG


TORONTO — John Lackey has a message for those fretting about Jon Lester living up to a contract stretching at least five years: Don’t worry about it.

“Jon’s a different deal, man. He works his butt off,” Lackey said. “He’ll be just fine in five years.”

TORONTO — John Lackey has a message for those fretting about Jon Lester living up to a contract stretching at least five years: don’t worry about it.

“Jon’s a different deal, man. He works his butt off,” Lackey said. “He’ll be just fine in five years.”

The debate surrounding the merits and pitfalls of signing a 30-something pitcher to a long-term deal has been in full force. Lester is setting himself up for a big payday –whether with the Red Sox or another team after the season — which would kick off with the lefty living life as a 31-year-old 0n Opening Day, 2014.

Lackey knows the mindset of a pitcher heading into such territory better than most.

The Red Sox starter was also 31 when he started his five-year, $82.5 million deal, which has a sixth-year option which will surely be picked up considering it is at the major league minimum. (“I haven’t even thought that far ahead. I’m just trying to get through this one first,” said Lackey of the contractual alteration born from missing the ’12 season due to Tommy John surgery.)

“I had multiple offers on four and five. I guess there were some teams that didn’t want to do it, but there’s always somebody who wants to do it,” he said. “I definitely wanted the five years, wanted the security at that time.”

As for the hesitation some clubs (including the Red Sox) seem to have when committing to a pitcher in their 30′s past four years, Lackey is an example of how free agency can sometimes alter what teams had hoped the market might be.

“That’s just an excuse for them not to give up money for an extra year,” he said regarding not going five years. “It’s their business. But there are exceptions to everything.”

As is the case with many pitchers’ long-term deals, Lackey hit a bump in the road while executing his deal. In his case it was the elbow operation. Cliff Lee is another example of a pitcher earning a long-term commitment despite heading through his 30′s. The Philadelphia lefty was dominant for the first three years of the deal, but is now battling elbow issues.

The reality is that such contracts may have unwanted hiccups. But Lackey insists that whatever team commits to Lester won’t have to worry about such a dynamic.

“He’s an example you want to be around the young guys. He’s how you do it. He’s a pro,” Lackey said of his rotation-mate. “You could take him and write a book about how to be a starting pitcher in the big leagues. He works his butt off. He handles his business. He never gets into any trouble. He’s not a guy you have to worry about. He doesn’t do anything dumb. He gets it.

“I’ve been fortunate to be around a lot of good guys who do things the right way, but performance-wise and ability-wise he’s better than those guys and does it the right way. He’s pretty good.”

And now that Lackey is winding down to the end of his big deal, how does he feel pitching on the other side of 35?

“Overall, especially with last year and the way things are going this year, I guess it’s worked out pretty good,” he said. “I definitely physically I have a few more years left in me, for sure.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox leadoff hitter Brock Holt, who since being inserted into the top spot in the batting order has been among the best leadoff men in baseball. Heading into Tuesday night, no other leadoff hitter has had more hits (77) since May 23, with Holt having played every inning of every game during that stretch.

[0:00:49] ... this planet. Today's guest is Brock hole lead -- hitter for the Boston Red Sox. And you'll be -- -- -- about leading off for the Boston Red Sox nobody has done it better. In the entire major leagues since poll started this position for the Red Sox back on May ...
[0:01:37] ... lead off hitter. Brought -- they were brought colts. Leadoff -- The Boston Red Sox. Just a few at bats away from qualifying. For Major League Baseball status for batting average champs so obviously that's right -- the corner regulations on that product. -- -- -- -- -- -- ...
[0:05:51] ... to its teams in -- So all so for some reason Allison Gary pettis -- tackled it. These are with the win you obviously when you're leaving -- you're you're. When you're young -- I can ...
[0:08:17] ... ribeiro. Question was the cool thing about being leadoff hitter for the Boston Red Sox. There's a lot of cool things. What you eat buffet or free anybody be pretty cool but you know being on this team this is pretty special. And last -- you know we had driven them. Big Papi twice and went to his home on a boat this homers so I think most people say that's pretty cool. And you ...






Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox leadoff hitter Brock Holt, who since being inserted into the top spot in the batting order has been among the best leadoff men in baseball. Heading into Tuesday night, no other leadoff hitter has had more hits (77) since May 23, with Holt having played every inning of every game during that stretch.

TORONTO — It wasn’t difficult to identify that David Ross was in pain Tuesday night.

TORONTO — It wasn’t difficult to identify that David Ross was in pain Tuesday night.

The Red Sox catcher seemed to pull up lame while running to first after lining a third-inning single, bringing out both Red Sox manager John Farrell and trainer Rick Jameyson. But Ross remained in the game, finishing with three hits in what resulted in a 7-3 loss for the Sox to the Blue Jays.

After the game, Ross explained that the diagnosis for the ailment is plantar fasciitis on his right foot.

Ross — who wears orthotics due to flat feet — said he suffered a similar injury for the final two months of the 2007 season, albeit to his left foot.

“In the off-season I ruptured it and that’€™s what they do when they do surgery, they just go in and cut it,” he said.. “So I ruptured it and it hasn’€™t been a problem since. I was running today with the intent of letting that thing blow out. It would feel a lot better if it would.”

The backstop believed that the injury was a result of taping his left ankle after injuring himself during a mid-May series in Minnesota, leading to over-compensating on his right foot.

Ross didn’t believe the injury would make his miss any time.

It is the same injury Red Sox first baseman Mike Napoli dealt with for much of ’13. (Click here to read more about the particulars of the ailment.)

“It’s been going on for a few days,” he explained. “I was getting better. It was getting a lot better. I just aggravated on that one swing. It’s not going to keep me from playing I don’t think. It’s one of those things that’s going to effect my running a little bit, which is definitely not something Manager John [Farrell] is worrying about, my speed to help the teamif it would.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford