Rob Bradford is joined by longtime baseball writer Sean McAdam to talk about a variety of subjects, including the inside story behind his parting ways with Comcast SportsNet New England. McAdam explains his exit from CSNNE, why he feels it happened and where he views the industry as the veteran scribe decides on his next challenge.

[0:04:31] ... your year be a cyclical. Nature to the season. And usually the Super Bowl finishes up. Johnny Miller is already down there waiting. And you know that your leaving you know depending on whether it's a ...



Pablo Sandoval (right) has had plenty of reason to accept congrats this spring. (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.



WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Chris Sale’s first Red Sox start is in the books. You may now commence forgetting everything about it or that it even happened.

Chris Sale, pictured earlier this spring, made his debut on Monday. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Chris Sale, pictured earlier this spring, made his debut on Monday. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Chris Sale’s first Red Sox start is in the books. You may now commence forgetting everything about it or that it even happened.

Sale wasn’t exactly pleased with his spring training debut against the Astros on Monday. Expected to throw three innings, he instead departed after two on a windy day. He allowed four hits and two runs (1 earned), while throwing 37 pitches and 26 strikes.

“Happy? I don’t know,” Sale said. “We got some good work in. I’m not a fan of sitting here and saying spring training doesn’t matter. You still want to get results, but I felt good. The ball felt great coming out of my hand. Felt strong throughout. I was able to throw all my pitches for strikes. That was a step in the right direction.”

“I’ve been waiting for this for a while,” Sale added. “It’s tough just sitting around just doing practice and things like that. This is why we’re here. We like going  out there and playing the game. Especially as a starting pitcher. I have enough downtime. It was fun. I enjoy doing what I do and I love pitching.  Today was fun to get out there and get the ball rolling.”

Sale was clocked as high as 97 mph, though the stadium radar gun is said to run a couple of mph fast.

The Astros struck quickly when Sam Travis dropped George Springer’s leadoff pop-up behind first base in swirling winds. A double, pop-up, and Evan Gattis sacrifice fly plated Chicago’s first run before Josh Reddick grounded out to end the frame.

“Even right out of the gate, you’ve got second and third and nobody out,” Sale said. “Those are good situations to be in. It’s going to happen sometime throughout the year. It’s nice to be able to get into those scenarios and try to work your way out of them. Obviously I didn’t. It’s nice to get out there — the whole being comfortable with being uncomfortable type of thing. You’ve got to work on that, too.”

Sale struck out two in the second, but a series of bloop singles plate a second run. He struck out Marwin Gonzalez looking at an offspeed pitch to end his afternoon.

” I feel fine,” Sale said. “The first few days maybe you’re shaking off the cobwebs and kicking off the dust. With the players, with the staff, with everyone involved, they’ve made me feel right at home here. And I am.”

Sale wanted to pitch longer.

“I understand why,” he said. “I racked up a pretty good amount of pitches, which is another thing I’d like to get down. I’d like to go out there for maybe 13 to 15. That’s the range as a starter you like to get. It gives you a chance to finish the game and save the bullpen. This is the first time out. It is  what it is. We’ll take it for what it is and we’ll roll with it. We’ll try to be better the next time out. If I had gone out there and thrown two perfect innings, I’m still going to try to get better from that. I’ve got some things to work on and a week to get ready.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

Sam Travis hit a home run Monday. Ho hum.

The three-run blast against one of the best relievers in baseball a year ago, Houston’s Chris Devenski, boosted Travis’ Grapefruit League batting average to .357, having come into the the exhibition game in West Palm Beach, Fla. with a 1.333 OPS in his previous six games.

Sam Travis (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Sam Travis (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Sam Travis hit a home run Monday. Ho hum.

The three-run blast against one of the best relievers in baseball a year ago, Houston’s Chris Devenski, boosted Travis’ Grapefruit League batting average to .357, having come into the the exhibition game in West Palm Beach, Fla. with a 1.333 OPS in his previous six games.

If that kind of success sounds familiar, it’s for a reason. Travis dominated in his 18 spring training games last season, finishing with a batting average of .469 with a 1.147 OPS.

What continues to impress regarding Travis is his ability to hit the ball hard, even when making outs, against lefties and righties. Devenski, for instance, only allowed a single home run to a right-handed hitter in 205 plate appearances in 2016.

And while it’s still early, and pitchers are prioritizing mechanics over making outs, it’s tough to ignore what Travis is doing.

This is the reason the Red Sox dug in on Travis when not wanting to block him from the major leagues with even a three-year contract for Edwin Encarnacion. It’s why even when he wasn’t hitting for a lot of power in the minor leagues, folks in the organization raved about what he would be.

In some corners, he was nicknamed “Captain Caveman” because, in part, he doesn’t wear batting gloves over an undershirt. When pressed on why he doesn’t wear anything under his uniform top, the 23-year-old only said, “No reason, really. That’s how I’ve always done it since I was in Little League.”

Will Travis make the Red Sox out of spring training? Not unless there’s an injury to Hanley Ramirez or Mitch Moreland. But what he continues to do is make the team’s blueprint for life beyond 2017 look pretty good. (Moreland is on a one-year deal, while Ramirez is signed through 2018 with a vesting option for 2019, having to total 1,050 plate appearances in ’17-18.

(To read more about Dave Dombrowski’s comments on prioritizing keeping Travis, click here.)

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Count David Price among those who are opposed to starting extra innings with a runner on second base.

After a scare last week, David Price reportedly won't have to undergo Tommy John surgery this season. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

After a scare last week, David Price reportedly won’t have to undergo Tommy John surgery this season. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Count David Price among those who are opposed to starting extra innings with a runner on second base.

In a tweet Monday, the Red Sox hurler mocked the proposal rule change, which will be implemented during the World Baseball Classic. The first game of the tournament between Israel and South Korea went into extras, with the Israeli team scoring the upset win after an infield single in the 10th inning. During the WBC, teams will start with runners on second and first base from the 11th inning onwards.

In addition to the WBC, the rule will also be tested in the low minor leagues this season. MLB’s Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre told Yahoo! last month the change is supposed to shorten game times and save pitching staffs.

“Let’s see what it looks like. It’s not fun to watch when you go through your whole pitching staff and wind up bringing a utility infielder in to pitch. As much as it’s nice to talk about being at an 18-inning game, it takes time,” he said.

It’s difficult to argue with Torre’s logic. Considering stadiums routinely empty out during extra innings, it seems like fans wouldn’t be against changing the format. But Price’s objection to the idea is a reminder of the uphill climb MLB faces whenever it wants to mess with tradition.

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer
Rob Bradford is joined by Dr. Nick Leong of Newton-Wellesley Orthopedic Associates to discuss all the ins and outs of David Price's injured elbow. Dr. Leung explains why the Red Sox and Price might have taken the course of action they did, what the prognosis could mean and where the pitcher goes from here.
Rob Bradford is joined by Dr. Nick Leong of Newton-Wellesley Orthopedic Associates to discuss all the ins and outs of David Price's injured elbow. Dr. Leung explains why the Red Sox and Price might have taken the course of action they did, what the prognosis could mean and where the pitcher goes from here.

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[0:01:19] ... here parity with which is the human elbow and in this case David price's humor ago. I. So let's get right to it. David Price has a lot of people known had an elbow injury he went through a simulated games which means he threw two innings ...
[0:04:08] ... a flex their muscle and bone Spurs is what report Lee white David Price test. When we hear strain there was an executive that told me one point in baseball they said when they say strain ...
[0:05:50] ... It's so sold this go back to calm the actual news of David Price. And and when you sort of start looking at this researching and saw the the timeline we talked a little bit of ...