David Price doesn't seem to handle criticism well. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

David Price doesn’t seem to handle criticism well. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

David Price is the highest-paid pitcher in baseball history. And he’s losing his mind because of Twitter trolls and bloviating talk radio hosts. We’re witnessing the self-destruction of a man.

In a bizarre interview with Stan Grossfeld of the Boston Globe, Price laments the treatment he received in Boston last year. He led the league in starts and innings pitched, but also gave up more hits than any other starting pitcher as well. In his lone postseason outing, Price surrendered five runs over 3.1 innings. The Red Sox wound getting swept by the Indians, and his career playoff record as a starter fell to 0-8.

Given Price’s astronomical salary, it was an underwhelming debut season. As a result, he faced some heat. The vitriol wasn’t immense –– Tom Brady’s Week 5 return against the Browns overshadowed the Red Sox’s October flop –– but his Twitter mentions probably weren’t pretty. Dan Shaughnessy wrote a mean thing about him in the Globe, too.  If Price can’t handle that, imagine how he would’ve fared when the Red Sox were the No. 1 team around here.

Throughout his conversation with Grossfeld, it’s apparent Price is paranoid. He rants about Red Sox fans being out to get him, and bemoans sports writers for not learning about his charity. Nearly the entire interview should disturb Red Sox management, but the most troublesome exchanges are below:

Q. What is your passion?

A. I have a foundation, Project One Four. That’s one of the things that honestly chafed me about being in Boston — with the reporters, not one time did anybody take the time to get to know me or my foundation or anything I do away from the field?

Baseball writers get paid to cover Price as a baseball player. They don’t get paid to publicize his charitable endeavors. That may seem callous, but it’s the truth. It doesn’t bode well for Price if he doesn’t understand that.

Q. One of your heroes is Satchel Paige, right?

A. Oh yeah.

Q. So Satchel Paige always said, “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.” So why are you still looking behind you on this 0-8 (playoff record) thing?

A. It’s what’s going to be said. If I say it first, what do you have to say about me? You have nothing to say about me personally. That’s the only thing you have to say.

Price, who will make $30 million this season, is apparently taking preemptive strikes against anonymous critics on Twitter. As a result, he does things like tweet about his playoff record while he’s on vacation in Hawaii. The egg avatars own real estate in his head. With that attitude, he couldn’t make it as a member of Kirk & Callahan’s “Casting Couch” –– never mind being ace of the Red Sox.

Q. Tell me something about you that people don’t know. Surprise me.

A. People in Boston don’t know anything about me. The only thing I have to do is pitch good. People don’t care about what I do or the type of person that I am. That doesn’t matter.

Q. It matters to me.

A. It doesn’t matter to these people in Boston. I’ve got to go out there and earn respect by pitching well. Period. That’s the only thing that’s going to turn the page for me in Boston. I’ve got to go out there and dominate. People don’t care what I do off the field.

Shockingly, Red Sox fans will judge Price by how he performs on the field. This should be common sense for any professional athlete, especially an 11-year Major League veteran.

Q. What size are your shoes?

A. 13½. If you lived it and you told me they cared, OK. If you experienced it on a day-to-day basis — everything — you wouldn’t think that. They don’t care. I’m David Price the pitcher; I’m not a person.

It seems like Price lives in an alternative universe. He took the mound 17 times at Fenway last season, and was greeted with nothing but applause during every single start. The “everything” Price is referring to appears to be people chiding him on talk radio and social media. Just view us as white noise, David. It will be better for your personal wellbeing.

Q. We can do something about it. People don’t know you’re bringing coffee to the trainers at 6:45 a.m.

A. People don’t care. I’m going to catch crap for bringing in Starbucks — sorry this is not Dunkin’ Donuts. I’m going to catch crap for that 100 percent. I could quote John 3:16 right now and I would get nothing but negativity. Period. You can’t please everybody.

These sound like the ratings of a crazy person, not somebody who’s ready to battle through a forearm injury and deliver a bounce back season. Up to this point, Carl Crawford’s seven-year, $142 million contract has been considered the worst in Red Sox history. But depending on how Price fares in 2017, his seven-year, $217 million deal could threaten to usurp it.

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer
Evan Drellich, Kirk, and Gerry all agree that Price isn't cut out for Boston.

[0:02:35] ... like this and what do you think earlier in the interview. About Tom Brady he's always focusing on the present he's not worried about the past right and it isn't. Five minutes later in the interview ...
[0:06:49] ... release that you guys between now that's fine but he didn't like Jon Lester with the never quit but they are never going to press them two of his offense. You know what you get a ...
[0:07:48] ... about it right chair I think that his talent it's this isn't Carl Crawford. Crawford's talent his health. They'll clip I prices health and issues it is it is that it probably run proved that at ...
[0:11:00] ... answer deserves a follow up. Follow do remember the 2018 pitched against Pedro Martinez in the minors she's she's scan c'mon. Said it didn't care about that no no not human being as they got potter ...






Evan Drellich, Kirk, and Gerry all agree that Price isn't cut out for Boston.

[0:02:35] ... like this and what do you think earlier in the interview. About Tom Brady he's always focusing on the present he's not worried about the past right and it isn't. Five minutes later in the interview ...
[0:06:49] ... release that you guys between now that's fine but he didn't like Jon Lester with the never quit but they are never going to press them two of his offense. You know what you get a ...
[0:07:48] ... about it right chair I think that his talent it's this isn't Carl Crawford. Crawford's talent his health. They'll clip I prices health and issues it is it is that it probably run proved that at ...
[0:11:00] ... answer deserves a follow up. Follow do remember the 2018 pitched against Pedro Martinez in the minors she's she's scan c'mon. Said it didn't care about that no no not human being as they got potter ...






http://www.weei.com/sports/boston/baseball/red-sox/john-tomase/2017/01/25/there-are-56596-reasons-rusney-castillo-wont-s
Rusney Castillo

Rusney Castillo

It’s only 11 at-bats, but considering the way Rusney Castillo started camp, he and the Red Sox will take them.

Castillo was castigated for failing to run out a ground ball at the start of camp — an unforgivable lapse for a player who’s making $72.5 million despite losing his spot on the 40-man roster — but Castillo has bounced back since.

He leads the Red Sox in hitting so far this spring (.545) and is 6-for-11 with three doubles. He has hit the ball with authority in reserve appearances, and will start on Thursday when the Red Sox face the Mets in Port St. Lucie.

“He has gotten some pitches in the zone to handle,” manager John Farrell said. “He’s played well above average defense in center field. He’s starting tomorrow against the Mets. He’s come off the bench almost every game. That’s not an easy thing to do. But in his case, he’s grabbing the at-bats and the reps when they’re available to him. After the lapse on the ball just running it out, he’s been very good, as far as the attention to detail and whatever decisions he’s had to make inside the lines.”

Of course, there’s more to Castillo’s roster aspirations than performance. As we detailed during the offseason, because Castillo has been dropped from the 40-man roster, adding him back in order to activate him would cost the team almost $60,000 a day towards the luxury tax.

Farrell said Castillo should just focus on his performance.

“We recognize that he is not on the roster, so he’s got to perform his way to get back on it,” Farrell said. “If there’s anything he might perceive as restricting him, you’ve just got to outperform it.”

“It really gets pretty simple, honestly,” Farrell added. “For all that we talk about it, for any guy, it’s simple. Just go out and play. That’s easier said than done, but you go out and produce, see what happens. You could say the same about Allen Craig. Both guys are having pretty good springs. I don’t think they’re thinking about their contracts. That’s where they are.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

The Red Sox visit Port St. Lucie on Thursday, and the carnival will be in town.

It’s Tim Tebow time!

The former NFL-quarterback-turned-quixotic -baseball-player will make his spring debut and start at designated hitter when the Sox face the Mets at Tradition Field. Tebow will be thrown right into the fire against defending American League Cy Young winner Rick Porcello.

The Red Sox visit Port St. Lucie on Thursday, and the carnival will be in town.

It’s Tim Tebow time!

The former NFL quarterback turned quixotic baseball player will make his spring debut and start at designated hitter when the Sox face the Mets at Tradition Field. Tebow will be thrown right into the fire, too, against defending American League Cy Young winner Rick Porcello.

So what do the Red Sox expect?

“It seems like no matter what he gets involved in, it’s always going to grab headlines or draw a crowd,” manager John Farrell said. “A gifted athlete. Let’s see how he handles a major league environment, particularly in the batter’s box.”

“So many different guys come through camp,” Farrell added. “I’m looking forward to seeing it.”

The 2007 Heisman Trophy winner is best known for his football exploits, which included an overtime playoff victory for the Broncos before losing to the Patriots. Tebow got a shot with the Patriots during training camp in 2013 before being cut.

He’s attempting to do what many consider impossible and remake himself as a baseball player at age 29, despite not playing since high school.

“I wouldn’t even attach an age to it,” Farrell said. “It’s tough to make the big leagues if you’re 24 years old. You know that he devoted most of his professional career to football, so making a change with a number of years gap in there, that adds another dynamic to it, but I’ve never seen him play in person. I can’t give you how difficult or how unlikely or how likely him arriving at the major leagues, if at all, will be.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

While his teammates were sleeping, Xander Bogaerts helped Team Netherlands beat Team South Korea, 5-0 in their first game in the WBC Tuesday morning.

Bogaerts went 1-for-4 with a triple, while playing third base. He hit third in the order behind Andrelton Simmons and Jurickson Profar.

While his teammates were sleeping, Xander Bogaerts helped Team Netherlands beat Team South Korea, 5-0 in their first game in the WBC Tuesday morning.

Bogaerts went 1-for-4 with a triple, while playing third base. He hit third in the order behind Andrelton Simmons and Jurickson Profar.

The Netherlands scored two runs in the first inning and didn’t look back. They are in Pool A with South Korea, Chinese Taipei and Israel.

Blog Author: 
WEEI
Rob Bradford is joined by longtime baseball writer Sean McAdam to talk about a variety of subjects, including the inside story behind his parting ways with Comcast SportsNet New England. McAdam explains his exit from CSNNE, why he feels it happened and where he views the industry as the veteran scribe decides on his next challenge.

[0:04:31] ... your year be a cyclical. Nature to the season. And usually the Super Bowl finishes up. Johnny Miller is already down there waiting. And you know that your leaving you know depending on whether it's a ...