Rob Bradford is joined by two-time All-Star outfielder Carlos Quentin, who is attempting a comeback with the Red Sox this spring. Quentin's path back to baseball involves almost quitting the game less than a year ago, losing 40 pounds and trying to sell himself to general managers all over Major League Baseball. Quentin explains his journey, which has led him to the back fields at JetBlue Park.
Rob Bradford is joined by two-time All-Star outfielder Carlos Quentin, who is attempting a comeback with the Red Sox this spring. Quentin's path back to baseball involves almost quitting the game less than a year ago, losing 40 pounds and trying to sell himself to general managers all over Major League Baseball. Quentin explains his journey, which has led him to the back fields at JetBlue Park.

[0:00:40] ... with the other minor leaguers. What sort of what you have what Carlos Quentin right now when he is to me one of the most interesting aspects of this camp. Best case scenario he lives at ...
[0:01:31] ... now. Which. Was after losing forty pounds. Was after playing at a Mexican league for like a month. Is after calling GM. Himself diving go through an agent all of that that how we landed here ...
[0:02:05] ... and I was just in the Red Sox clubhouse and has started Dustin Pedroia you know Dustin right Karros then on a page through quite a bit high so he he wanted to thank you personally ...
[0:03:05] ... year you played the Mets seemingly correct I have played from month. Mexican League just kind as little to board wanted to kind of go and do take a little bit tonight did in. At that ...






Rob Bradford is joined by two-time All-Star outfielder Carlos Quentin, who is attempting a comeback with the Red Sox this spring. Quentin's path back to baseball involves almost quitting the game less than a year ago, losing 40 pounds and trying to sell himself to general managers all over Major League Baseball. Quentin explains his journey, which has led him to the back fields at JetBlue Park.

[0:00:40] ... with the other minor leaguers. What sort of what you have what Carlos Quentin right now when he is to me one of the most interesting aspects of this camp. Best case scenario he lives at ...
[0:01:31] ... now. Which. Was after losing forty pounds. Was after playing at a Mexican league for like a month. Is after calling GM. Himself diving go through an agent all of that that how we landed here ...
[0:02:05] ... and I was just in the Red Sox clubhouse and has started Dustin Pedroia you know Dustin right Karros then on a page through quite a bit high so he he wanted to thank you personally ...
[0:03:05] ... year you played the Mets seemingly correct I have played from month. Mexican League just kind as little to board wanted to kind of go and do take a little bit tonight did in. At that ...






DUNEDIN, Fla. — It took a while for Steven Wright to dive into Grapefruit League action, but it seemed to be worth the wait for the knuckleballer and the Red Sox.

DUNEDIN, Fla. — It took a while for Steven Wright to dive into Grapefruit League action, but it seemed to be worth the wait for the knuckleballer and the Red Sox.

Making his spring training debut Monday against the Blue Jays, Wright pitched two innings, throwing 21 pitches, 16 of which were strikes. He faced seven batters, allowing Jarrod Saltalamacchia to reach via an error by shortstop Brock Holt.

Wright, who was facing off with J.A. Happ, integrated four fastballs, leaving his outing with the game scoreless.

Red Sox manager John Farrell said before the game that both Wright and Drew Pomeranz, who is slated to make his spring training debut Tuesday, will stay behind in Fort Myers when the team heads to Boston. The duo will most likely be working on an 85-90-pitch limit in their first regular season outing.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

David Price is as surprised as anyone at how good he feels.

Told by two of the nation’s leading experts on elbow injuries to “listen to my body,” Price began throwing a baseball against a trampoline as part of a light throwing program that he hopes starts him on the road to recovery since being sidelined two weeks ago by arm pain.

David Price

David Price

David Price is as surprised as anyone at how good he feels.

Told by two of the nation’s leading experts on elbow injuries to “listen to my body,” Price began throwing a baseball against a trampoline as part of a light throwing program that he hopes starts him on the road to recovery since being sidelined two weeks ago by arm pain.

“It feels good,” Price told reporters in Fort Myers on Monday. “It’s been getting better every day. I’m kind of surprised that it’s responded the way that it has. If you asked me a week ago I’d have said I felt OK. And I feel really good right now. Today is the best it’s felt. Just everyday activities. I don’t feel anything in there right now. So that’s coming after two straight days of throwing baseballs into the net so it’s responded really well.”

Price visited Drs. James Andrews and Neal ElAttrache in Indianapolis on March 3, three days after reporting discomfort following a simulated game. The doctors told him that were he 22 or 23, they’d recommend surgery. But because Price is 31 and has learned to pitch through discomfort, they suggested rest and rehab, instead.

Price said the inflammation has already subsided, and he’s regaining range of motion. He’s not ready to commit to being ready for the start of the season, but he likes where he’s headed.

“At the end of the day, I feel like there’s going to be a lot of good that can come from this,” Price said. “Just take my time and make sure I’m ready to come back.”

For more on Price’s return, as well as my skepticism over his long-term prognosis, check out this column.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

David Price and the Red Sox hope his elbow stays intact. (Jake Roth/USA Today Sports)I want to believe David Price is fine. I do.



Clay Buchholz says he wasn’t surprised when the Red Sox traded him to the Phillies last December. In fact, he was expecting it to happen sooner.

Carson Smith (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Carson Smith (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

DUNEDIN, Fla. — When draw up predictions for the Red Sox bullpen in 2017, it’s often easy to forget the guy who was supposed to be their eighth-inning answer a year ago.

Monday back in Fort Myers, Carson Smith put himself back into the conversation

The reliever, who first had elbow discomfort during a spring training game last March 21, threw off a mound for hte first time. And while a realistic return date still wouldn’t seem to be before well into May, Smith’s 18-pitch session was a significant step in the right direction.

“Coming back from Tommy John myself, and seeing other pitchers, that’s a marker you’re looking for, getting on the mound that first time,” Farrell said. “He’s done very good as far as progressing through consecutive days of long-toss and flat ground. That’s all been handled fine. So today, another positive step for him. … I wouldn’t categorize today as a full bullpen, but it’s a significant day.”

Smith, in case you forgot, was dealt for from Seattle prior to last season along with Roenis Elias in exchange for Wade Miley and Jonathan Aro. Miley is currently with the Orioles, having been traded to Baltimore last July 31, while Aro is still with the Mariners but not on the 40-man roster after being designated for assignment.

The guy who was acquired to help fill that eighth-inning spot this time around, while Smith heals, Tyler Thornburg,threw out to 180 feet Monday and is slated to participate in a bullpen session Wednesday. Thornburg has been scaled back while acclimating himself to a more intense shoulder strengthening program.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford