Here’s a look at the action in the Red Sox farm system on Tuesday.

Roenis Elias

Roenis Elias

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (67-62): L, 9-0, vs. Syracuse (Nationals)

— Left-hander Roenis Elias got roughed up, surrendering a Triple-A high seven runs on nine hits through six innings. His runs allowed came in spurts, as he let up three runs in the opening frame, two in the third, and another two in the sixth. He struck out four and walked one. Elias had been dealt just one loss over his previous 13 appearances. The 28-year-old, who has had three major league outings this season, now is 9-5 with a 3.98 ERA in the minors.

— Bryce Brentz went 2-for-4 with his 17th double of the season. He is 5-for-19 in his six games since returning to Pawtucket from Boston. Brentz, 27, is slashing .261/.312/.414 in 53 games with the PawSox.

— Jose Vinicio also collected two hits for his third multi-hit performance in nine games. The 23-year-old infielder is batting .258/.284/.324 with seven stolen bases in 65 games.

DOUBLE-A PORTLAND SEA DOGS (50-76): W, 8-2, vs. New Hampshire (Blue Jays)

— Yoan Moncada did it all for Portland, drilling his 10th Double-A home run and drawing four walks to reach base in all five plate appearances. He also made a great play at third base as he continues to make the adjustment to the hot corner.

The four walks were a career high for Boston’s top prospect at MLB.com, and he has now reached base in eight straight plate appearances. His three-run bomb in the second inning gave Portland the lead for good. Moncada, 21, seems to have snapped out of his cold streak offensively, hitting .333 in his last 10 games. Overall this season he is hitting .298/.411/.522 in 379 at-bats between Portland and Salem.

— Jalen Beeks picked up the win, allowing two runs on five hits in five innings. It is the fourth win in the past five starts for the 23-year-old left-hander. He did walk four and struck out only one, however. Beeks now is 9-7 with a 3.71 ERA in 24 starts. He is Boston’s No. 29 prospect at MLB.com.

— Jake Romanski had his own strong day at the plate, going 3-for-4 with a double, two RBIs and a run scored. He was one of four Sea Dogs batters with multiple hits. Romanski, 25, snapped a four-game hitless streak and notched his first RBIs since Aug. 10. He is averaging .300/.333/.397 in 82 games with Portland.

— Luis Ysla came on in the ninth inning to end the game, striking out one and letting up no hits in the outing. Boston’s No. 24 prospect at MLB.com has let up one run in his last 6 2/3 innings. The 24-year-old reliever is 2-4 with a 3.78 ERA in 37 appearances.

Daniel McGrath

Daniel McGrath

HIGH-A SALEM RED SOX (78-48): L, 10-3, at Potomac (Nationals)

— Daniel McGrath was tagged with the loss, giving up seven runs (six earned) on three hits in three innings. Recently named the Carolina League Pitcher of the Week, McGrath gave up a season-high five walks that allowed Potomac to run away with it. McGrath, 22, is now 7-6 with a 4.42 ERA in 17 starts. Opponents are hitting just .222 when facing the southpaw.

— Jose Sermo was the only Salem batter with multiple hits, going 2-for-4 with a double and a run scored. The double was his 12th of the year. The 25-year-old outfielder is batting .353 in his last five games and is slashing .261/.315/.472 in 46 games this season.

— Mario Alcantara came on to replace McGrath, pitching three solid innings. The righty let up one run on two hits, fanning three batters and walking just one. Alcantara, 23, is 9-2 with a 3.44 ERA in 29 outings. Opposing batters are hitting .197 against him.

Austin Glorius

Austin Glorius

SINGLE-A GREENVILLE DRIVE (66-61): L, 2-1 in 10 innings, at Augusta (Giants)

— Austin Glorius pitched five strong inning for the Drive, holding Augusta to one run on three hits. He struck out two and walked just one. His ERA is 1.67 over his last 10 outings, totaling 23 strikeouts in that span. Glorius, 23, is 2-1 with a 3.13 ERA in 29 appearances.

Boston’s No. 8 prospect at MLB.com, Luis Alexander Basabe, went 2-for-5 with a double and drove in Greenville’s only run of the game. His RBI two-bagger in the fifth inning was his 23rd double of the season. The 19-year-old outfielder is slashing .258/.322/.455 with 43 extra-base hits in 99 games.

— Victor Diaz took the mound in the sixth inning, tossing four scoreless frames to force the game to extras. He struck out six and walked three while giving up three hits. The 22-year-old right-hander has not allowed a run in his last 13 outings. He is 2-5 with a 4.08 ERA in 34 appearances.

Chris Madera

Chris Madera

SHORT-SEASON SINGLE-A LOWELL SPINNERS (38-25): W, 6-5, at Vermont (Athletics)

— It was a good 24th birthday for Chris Madera, who knocked in the winning run in the top of the ninth inning. Madera, who replaced the injured Ryan Scott, beat out an infield single to drive in Jhon Nunez and break the tie. The outfielder finished 2-for-3 coming off of the bench. He has back-to-back multi-hit games and is batting .263/.354/.365 in 39 minor league games.

— Kevin Steen gave up five runs on four hits through five innings in the start. He struck out three and walked three. He left after giving up four runs in the fifth frame. Steen, 20, now is 2-4 with a 5.43 ERA in 12 outings.

— Tyler Hill continued his success, going 2-for-5 with a triple, and RBI and two runs. It was his fifth triple of the season, and he is now 11-for-14 in his last three contests. The 20-year-old outfielder is hitting .347/.414/.515 with 35 RBIs and 36 runs in 52 games.

Blog Author: 
Nicholas Frazier

Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling made his weekly appearance on Dennis & Callahan with Minihane on Wednesday morning to discuss the Red Sox’ playoff chances, Clay Buchholz’s resurgence, John Farrell’s job security and more.

Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling

Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling made his weekly appearance on Dennis & Callahan with Minihane on Wednesday morning to discuss the Red Sox’ playoff chances, Clay Buchholz’s resurgence, John Farrell’s job security and more. To hear the full conversation, go to to the D&C audio on demand page.

Through nine games of the Red Sox’ 11-game road trip, the Sox have posted a 7-2 record, which is something Schilling said is a good omen.

“I think by the end of this month you are going to know if they are in the playoffs,” he said. “I thought that this road trip, the amount of travel that they were going to have to do, the pitching had to be the thing carrying them and for the most part that is exactly what has happened. They are playing a good stretch of games on a nightmarish stretch of schedule. I like their chances, very much like their chances. If I was betting today, I would bet on them being in, but my issue gets back to you are going to play that Monday play-in game. Are you battling up to the last day of the season to get in, and if so, who is pitching that game for you? Listen, we are 5 1/2 weeks away, so anybody right now could get hot and you could say that is who I am giving the ball to, but who are you giving the ball to win that one game?

Buchholz pitched in his third spot start on Tuesday night and picked up his first win in almost a month after going 6 1/3 innings and allowing one run on five hits and two walks with nine strikeouts in a 2-1 victory over the Rays.

“The reason I think it feels like such a huge relief or a huge bump is he went into these last two starts, no one was expecting anything, right?” Schilling said of Buchholz. “We talk about seven innings and one run against Tampa as if he threw a no-no. … What happens in the postseason? How is that going to play itself out in the postseason? Is he going to be one of your three or four guys?”

When asked if Buchholz could come out of the bullpen as the eighth-inning reliever, Schilling said, “I don’t think his stuff translates [to that role]. One of the things about being a late-inning guy is you have to be able to be efficient from a pitch count and pitch selection perspective. You can’t go out in the eighth inning and get guys out with four pitches. It doesn’t work that way. You have to be able to go out and be a fastball-slider or fastball-splitter [pitcher]. When you are a late-inning guy it is about two pitches, two effective pitches that you can command on both sides of the plate. That is not what he does. He is a 90 to 92-93 guy, who when he was younger had four devastating pitches but now he has a very good curveball, a good changeup, he’s got a good cutter. You come into the eighth inning you might be getting an out, you’ve got to get a guy out with one or two pitches from a selection perspective and I don’t think that is the kind of pitcher he is.

“When you have four pitches some nights you are working. I had two pitches, but I tried to work with four. There were nights when you go out there and you have fastball-split, or when you have fastball-split and slider or maybe you just have a slider and a decent split. You’ve got to go out as a late-inning guy with a fastball that you throw for strikes and a breaking ball you can get swing and misses on every night. Think about all the great postseason guys. [Jonathan] Papelbon had the fastball-split. [Mariano] Rivera had the cutter. You think about all the guys that are good quality closers. Keith Foulke had the changeup. It all went around with great fastball command, which is not something [Buchholz] ever ever had. I think if he’s going to be in the bullpen he’s got to be a middle-inning guy, three-inning guy. I don’t know that he suits up or he can adjust to being a fastball [pitcher]. I don’t know what his second pitch would be. Probably a changeup, maybe.”

Schilling noted he doesn’t think there needs to be a three-inning middle reliever on a postseason roster.

“If you do, you are only going to play one or two games and that is the play-in game and you are going to lose the first two,” Schilling said. “You don’t set up a pitching staff like that.”

Farrell’s job security has been a hot topic most of the summer, although with the team playing well now it doesn’t appear likely the Sox would fire him before the end of the season.

“I don’t think that there is an opportunity to fire [Farrell], I would say specifically him, between now and the end of the season. I don’t think they are looking for one. I can’t tell you for sure, but I don’t think that would be something that would be conducive to getting in because when you think about all the things that go wrong in this media environment around that. That would create as much of a headache as it did a potential solution,” Schilling said. “Yes, I agree. If they don’t make the playoffs I think he is fired the day the season ends. We have seen in the last four or five years, epic collapses around the game and that usually ends up getting the guy fired. You are riding the wave of an unreal world championship and then, two, you know, below-the-bottom-of-the-barrel finishes. I think the fans here are very clear in their unhappiness on a consistent basis with him night-in, night-out. You know John [Henry], the whole ownership, listens to this radio station.”

Following are more highlights from the conversation. For more Red Sox news, got to weei.com/redsox.

On  keeping a baseball team in Tampa: “Honestly, that is the late-’90s Montreal. They have to get that team out of there. … I think you have to get it out of Florida because the Marlins have the very same thing. It’s much like Arizona, it’s a very transient population. Nobody is born and raised down there. Everyone vacations and retires down there, so they bring their own favorite teams with them. Arizona is the same way, it is very hard to build up a very dyed-in-the-wool and ground-up foundation of fans. I don’t know where else to move them. I have thought about this, but I don’t think either franchise is going to be able to survive down there. But I will tell you what, I always loved pitching there. It was very comfortable on that mound in that stadium. It was always a home crowd. If you watch that game [Tuesday] night it was the exact same thing. Red Sox fans travel unlike any other fans I ever played in front of or for and that’s not a bad thing going down there ’cause [the Rays] are back to where they were when I first got over here, which is they are not a very good team. They have decent young talent, but you feel like you come in here if you don’t win two out of three you feel like you lost a series.”

On the possible scrutiny he would face if he ran for U.S. Senator: “I jokingly say it, but it’s true: I played 10 years in Philadelphia, some of the worst media on the planet, and then I came here and it was kind of some of the worst media on the planet on steroids. Listen, if I had remotely thin skin I would’ve been out a long time ago because of the things that have been said and done, and I’m not playing the victim, I’m just saying the things that have happened since 2004 since I said, ‘Vote Bush,’ have been on one hand terrifying and on the other hand amusing. The extremes people have gone, the things people have said. I’m used to it. I keep trying to tell people that I know and that know me, the outpouring since I have talked about running for office has been pretty amazing. I mean, since I was initially talked about I was kind of trying to be a little humorous about it, it has gotten serious, so from that regard it’s interesting. These people are always going to be there, that’s the world we live in. All you have to do is look at the mainstream media in this election and the fact that Donald Trump, there will be seven articles about something he said that had nothing to with what he actually said, and Hillary Clinton will stab somebody and they will talk about how she was set up.”

Blog Author: 
John Hand

Rick Porcello admits he becomes a different person when on the mound. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- For four days, the mindset is fairly consistent. Even-keel. Laid back. Diligent about the work. Dry sense of humor.



The steady Rick Porcello will take the mound for the Red Sox on Wednesday in the third game of a four-game series with the Rays, who will send out right-hander Matt Andriese.

Porcello leads the American League with 17 wins, accompanied by a 3.22 ERA and 1.04 WHIP. He has pitched at least seven innings in his last five starts, his most recent coming in a 10-2 win over Detroit on Friday. The 27-year-old right-hander held the Tigers to one earned run on four hits in seven innings, striking out eight and walking just two.

“It was weird being on the other side,” said Porcello, who was a Tiger for six seasons. “But it helped a lot that I pitched against them last year [in Boston] and that we came here last year. Today didn’t feel quite as strange, so I was able to settle in and enjoy it.”

In 14 career starts against the Rays, Porcello is 8-4 with a 2.85 ERA. His last game vs. Tampa came on July 9 of this season, when he held the Rays to one run on six hits in seven innings in a 4-1 Red Sox victory.

In 22 appearances, 12 of them being starts, Andriese is 6-5 with a 3.66 ERA and 1.12 WHIP. A relief pitcher being used to fill out the starting rotation, Andriese has lost his last three starts, his last defeat coming in a 6-2 game against the Rangers on Friday. The 26-year-old gave up five runs on seven hits in 5 1/3 innings, fanning four and walking two.

Andriese kept the Rangers scoreless through the first four innings, until he began to falter in the fifth with a leadoff home run by Mitch Moreland. Andriese was not able to recover after that.

“I kind of hit a wall there,” Andriese said. “I just was out there grinding it out. Didn’t feel the best. Just was out there, put it to work.”

Andries has taken on the Red Sox three times in his two-year career and has not given up a run in any of those three contests. He pitched 2 2/3 scoreless innings in a 4-0 Red Sox win on July 10 of this season, striking out five.

Red Sox vs. Andriese (RHP)

Mookie Betts is 1-for-5.

Jackie Bradley Jr. is 0-for-4 with 2 strikeouts.

Xander Bogaerts is 1-for-3 with 1 strikeout.

Sandy Leon is 1-for-3 with 1 strikeout.

David Ortiz is 0-for-3 with 1 strikeout.

Travis Shaw is 0-for-2 with 1 strikeout.

Chris Young is 0-for-2 with 1 strikeout.

Brock Holt is 0-for-2 with 2 strikeouts.

Dustin Pedroia is 0-for-1 with 1 walk and 1 strikeout.

Rays vs. Porcello (RHP)

Evan Longoria (36 plate appearances): .250 AVG/.289 OBP/.333 SLG, 3 doubles, 3 RBIs, 2 walks, 9 strikeouts

Desmond Jennings (22): .318/.375/.500, 1 double, 1 home run, 3 RBIs, 2 walks, 5 strikeouts

Logan Forsythe (20): .300/.364/.400, 1 triple, 2 walks, 2 strikeouts

Kevin Kiermaier (20): .250/.286/.300, 1 double, 1 RBI, 1 walk, 2 strikeouts

Steven Souza Jr. (18): .333/.333/.333, 5 strikeouts

Logan Morrison (16): .375/.375/.438, 1 double, 1 RBI, 5 strikeouts

Hank Conger (12): .167/.167/.167, 2 RBIs, 2 strikeouts

Brad Miller (11): .273/.333/1.091, 3 home runs, 3 RBIs, 1 walk, 3 strikeouts

Corey Dickerson (10): .300/.300/.800, 2 doubles, 1 home run, 1 RBI, 2 strikeouts

Blog Author: 
Nicholas Frazier

A big decision about Clay Buchholz's role is coming up for the Red Sox. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

A big decision about Clay Buchholz’s role is coming up for the Red Sox. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Clay Buchholz has become one of the Red Sox’ most important pitchers. So why shouldn’t he be put in what has become this team’s most unsettled spot?

After the Red Sox’ 2-1 win over the Rays Tuesday night, John Farrell wasn’t tipping his hand. Would the guy who just rattled off a 6 2/3-inning, one-run gem stay in the starting rotation, or be pushed back to the bullpen due to the return of Steven Wright?

“As far as Clay goes, this will be more conversation within,” Farrell said. “But setting that aside, he’s throwing the ball exceptionally well right now.”

He sure is. A 1.96 ERA since July 27 backs that up. And so does his 2.70 ERA in the three starts Buchholz has turned in since filling in for Wright. Watch him over the past two outings, and it’s easy to envision the righty qualified to start a postseason game.

So it would only make sense to let Buchholz keep rolling along in the starting rotation, right? Wrong.

This isn’t about whether or not he could keep having success in the starting rotation. Considering Buchholz’s history, he would seem to be primed for one of those runs he has previously executed. The track record is that when the pitcher gets going like this, he is only derailed by one thing — injuries.

The priority here is finding a lock-down eighth inning guy, and Buchholz is the best candidate for that position.

“Yeah,” said Buchholz when asked if he would embrace such a challenge. “I like competition. I like being in spots where everybody is betting against you.”

The Red Sox have very viable candidates to keep the starting rotation’s recent success trending in the right direction. When healthy, Eduardo Rodriguez and Wright have proven enough to have faith they can be leaned on.

The eighth inning? That’s another story.

Brad Ziegler needs to be put in more specific situations, and not just sent out every eighth to get three outs. Take a look at the swing lefty hitter Kevin Kiermaier put on the reliever’s one-out offering, that resulted in an absolute rocket down the right field line. He can pitch to lefties, but getting ground balls and prioritizing dominating tough righty hitters should be the priority.

There has been some rumblings about choosing to use former reliever Drew Pomeranz to high-leverage land. But considering the lefty is on a pretty good run, himself, and, unlike Buchholz, hasn’t pitched out of the bullpen this season, that seems like an unnecessary move.

Buchholz actually seemed to start thriving in his relief role, which was his existence just a few weeks ago. And when it comes to those all-important eighth-inning outs, there is something to be said for stuff, and Tuesday night’s repertoire (which included a 95 mph moving fastball) spoke volumes.

“It’s different than I thought it was going to be the first time I got sent to the bullpen,” he said. “I still think of it as a demotion, because obviously it is. But you still have to have your wits about you out there because you’re coming into scenarios inside of a game that are going to be big scenarios, important scenarios. I think it was a really good thing to see that from both sides. Having to make pitches on a moment’s notice. It has been good.”

Maybe the Red Sox prioritize drawing back on Pomeranz’s innings and his ability to get out lefties. Or perhaps they take their time with Rodriguez and give Buchholz another start to delay the decision.

But it just seems like, as we sit here, Buchholz is one of the Red Sox’ most effective pitchers. And that being the case, it sure would seem like a good idea to use someone like that in a place like the eighth inning.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.
Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

A big decision about Clay Buchholz's role is coming up for the Red Sox. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

A big decision about Clay Buchholz’s role is coming up for the Red Sox. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Clay Buchholz has become one of the Red Sox’ most important pitchers. So why shouldn’t he be put in what has become this team’s most unsettled spot?

After the Red Sox’ 2-1 win over the Rays Tuesday night, John Farrell wasn’t tipping his hand. Would the guy who just rattled off a 6 2/3-inning, one-run gem stay in the starting rotation, or be pushed back to the bullpen due to the return of Steven Wright?

“As far as Clay goes, this will be more conversation within,” Farrell said. “But setting that aside, he’s throwing the ball exceptionally well right now.”

He sure is. A 1.96 ERA since July 27 backs that up. And so does his 2.70 ERA in the three starts Buchholz has turned in since filling in for Wright. Watch him over the past two outings, and it’s easy to envision the righty qualified to start a postseason game.

So it would only make sense to let Buchholz keep rolling along in the starting rotation, right? Wrong.

This isn’t about whether or not he could keep having success in the starting rotation. Considering Buchholz’s history, he would seem to be primed for one of those runs he has previously executed. The track record is that when the pitcher gets going like this, he is only derailed by one thing — injuries.

The priority here is finding a lock-down eighth inning guy, and Buchholz is the best candidate for that position.

“Yeah,” said Buchholz when asked if he would embrace such a challenge. “I like competition. I like being in spots where everybody is betting against you.”

The Red Sox have very viable candidates to keep the starting rotation’s recent success trending in the right direction. When healthy, Eduardo Rodriguez and Wright have proven enough to have faith they can be leaned on.

The eighth inning? That’s another story.

Brad Ziegler needs to be put in more specific situations, and not just sent out every eighth to get three outs. Take a look at the swing lefty hitter Kevin Kiermaier put on the reliever’s one-out offering, that resulted in an absolute rocket down the right field line. He can pitch to lefties, but getting ground balls and prioritizing dominating tough righty hitters should be the priority.

There has been some rumblings about choosing to use former reliever Drew Pomeranz to high-leverage land. But considering the lefty is on a pretty good run, himself, and, unlike Buchholz, hasn’t pitched out of the bullpen this season, that seems like an unnecessary move.

Buchholz actually seemed to start thriving in his relief role, which was his existence just a few weeks ago. And when it comes to those all-important eighth-inning outs, there is something to be said for stuff, and Tuesday night’s repertoire (which included a 95 mph moving fastball) spoke volumes.

“It’s different than I thought it was going to be the first time I got sent to the bullpen,” he said. “I still think of it as a demotion, because obviously it is. But you still have to have your wits about you out there because you’re coming into scenarios inside of a game that are going to be big scenarios, important scenarios. I think it was a really good thing to see that from both sides. Having to make pitches on a moment’s notice. It has been good.”

Maybe the Red Sox prioritize drawing back on Pomeranz’s innings and his ability to get out lefties. Or perhaps they take their time with Rodriguez and give Buchholz another start to delay the decision.

But it just seems like, as we sit here, Buchholz is one of the Red Sox’ most effective pitchers. And that being the case, it sure would seem like a good idea to use someone like that in a place like the eighth inning.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.
Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — It was a good moment for Clay Buchholz.

Clay Buchholz has been on quite a roll. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Clay Buchholz has been on quite a roll. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — It was a good moment for Clay Buchholz.

The Red Sox starter not only could revel in his 6 1/3-inning, one-run outing against the Rays Tuesday night, but he could do so while passing on the good news to his family, which was back home in Texas. (Buchholz’s daughter had just started kindergarten the day before.) And he was living this life while sitting at the familiar Tropicana Field visitors’ clubhouse’s locker, one which he had inhabited for the majority of his time visiting as a Red Sox.

Considering his success at the home of the Rays (3-0 with a 0.54 ERA in his last five Tropicana Field starts), the scene was a familiar one for Buchholz.

Yet, as he admitted after the Red Sox’ 2-1 win, it was a moment he didn’t think would be presenting itself by the time Aug. 23 game around. At least not in a Boston uniform.

“No. I don’t think so,” said Buchholz when asked if he thought he would be pitching in a Red Sox uniform by the time Aug. 23 came around. “I wasn’t really worried about it because I know what I can do on a baseball field. I’ve done it for a long time. Sometimes you struggle and the game forces you to make adjustments that you didn’t necessarily know you needed to make. There were a couple of adjustments I needed to make. The bullpen scenario, that actually helped me out with it. Just sort of dumb it down and not over-think things I was over-thinking at the time. Just try and have fun with it again rather it be a chore every time you step out there.”

But there was Buchholz, still wearing the gray and reds. For that, he could the approach taken by Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski heading into the non-waiver trade deadline.

“We just felt his stuff was good enough to pitch at the big league level and be successful,” Dombrowski said. “It’s hard to find good big league pitchers, and he has that type of stuff. We knew we needed protection in case we had an injury. We didn’t have anybody else to protect us. So that combination was important. He’s been successful at the big league level, and our guys here had seen him be successful. We just felt he could do it again.

“We weren’t really looking to move him. You listen on anybody, but we weren’t looking to move him.”

The move has paid off for both sides.

The way Buchholz has turned things around — boasting a 1.96 ERA since July 27 — he would have been perhaps the most valuable starting pitching acquisition leading up to Aug. 1. In comparison, Matt Moore is 0-3 with a 4.70 ERA in four starts with the Giants, while Andrew Cashner hasn’t been any better for the Marlins, boasting a 5.48 ERA in five appearances. And Rich Hill won’t have pitched for the Dodgers, due to a blister, until Wednesday.

While his future role is now uncertain with Steven Wright returning to the rotation Friday night, Buchholz is simply looking to keep his momentum going. With a $13.5 million team option looming, and the chance to serve in some high-leverage capacity for this first-place team, it would behoove all parties to keep riding the righty’s current wave of success.

“Starting is all I’ve ever done,” Buchholz said. “Yeah, I’ve struggled this year quite a bit, but I’m not going to quit trying to fix what was wrong with me. We’ve got a good staff of coaches, trainers and front office, they do their job well. I told them them whenever I got the opportunity again I would make the most of it. And here we are.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — One out. Eighth inning. Tying run at the plate. Red Sox outfielder saves the day with a spectacular play. Sound familiar?