Here is what happened in the Red Sox farm system on Monday.

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (15-18): L, 8-4 (12 innings), at Scranton W/B

Brian Johnson had another strong outing Monday. (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Brian Johnson had another strong outing Monday. (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Here is what happened in the Red Sox farm system on Monday.

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (15-18): L, 8-4 (12 innings), at Scranton W/B

— The PawSox lost on a walkoff grand slam off Brandon Workman with one out in the bottom of the 12th. It was the first batter Workman faced after Chandler Shepherd exited the game with the bases loaded. The game got to extra innings when Blaine Boyer allowed a run in the ninth inning to pick up a blown save.

— Three members of the PawSox had multi-hit games, including Steve Selsky, Sam Travis and Dan Butler. Selsky hit his third home run of the season, a two-run shot in the third inning.

— Brian Johnson delivered another solid start, as the left-handed allowed three runs in 6 1/3 innings while scattering seven hits, walking three and striking out six. His ERA is now 2.92 on the year and hasn’t allowed more than three earned runs in any of his seven starts.

DOUBLE-A PORTLAND SEA DOGS (17-14): Scheduled off-day

HIGH-A SALEM RED SOX (24-13): L, 9-5, vs. Fredrick

— Salem led 5-4, but allowed five runs from the seventh inning on to take the loss. Gerson Bautista took the loss, as he allowed three runs in two innings of work. Starter Matt Kent was effective, as he allowed four runs (two earned) over six innings, while walking one and striking out four.

— Third baseman Michael Chavis paced the offense going 2-for-5 with a double and a RBI. He’s batting .333 on the year.

— Besides Chavis, the Red Sox had three other extra-base hits, including doubles from Austin Rei, Bryan Hudson and Trenton Kemp.

SINGLE-A GREENVILLE DRIVE (24-12): W, 9-6, at Delmarva

— The two teams combined for five homers, but the Drive came away with a three-run win thanks to six unanswered runs to close the game out.

— Santiago Espinal, Tyler Hill and Tucker Tubbs all homered in the win. It was Hill’s fourth of the season.

— Algenis Martinez picked up the win by tossing 2 1/3 scoreless innings of relief.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Drew Pomeranz was hopeful he wouldn’t have to miss a start. After getting the results of Monday’s MRI, he might have a chance.

Pomeranz, who exited his start Sunday afternoon after just three innings due to left triceps stiffness, underwent an MRI at Mass General Hospital. According to the Red Sox, the exam showed no changes when compared to previous studies.

Drew Pomeranz

Drew Pomeranz

Drew Pomeranz was hopeful he wouldn’t have to miss a start. After getting the results of Monday’s MRI, he might have a chance.

Pomeranz, who exited his start Sunday afternoon after just three innings due to left triceps stiffness, underwent an MRI at Mass General Hospital. According to the Red Sox, the exam showed no changes when compared to previous studies.

The lefty had experienced soreness in his triceps during spring training, setting his progress back enough for Pomeranz to start to the regular season on the 10-day disabled list. But since making his first start, the pitcher hasn’t missed any time until Sunday.

Pomeranz is 3-3 in his seven starts, totaling a 5.29 ERA. In Sunday’s start, he allowed two runs on three hits and three walks while throwing 57 pitches.

If he is to make his next scheduled start, it would come in Oakland, Friday night.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

The move back to the lead off spot has clearly paid off for Mookie Betts.

Betts went on a tear last week and because of it was named the American League Player of the Week for the week ending on Sunday.

Mookie Betts

Mookie Betts

The move back to the lead off spot has clearly paid off for Mookie Betts.

Betts went on a tear last week and because of it was named the American League Player of the Week for the week ending on Sunday.

The right fielder hit .375 (9-for-24) with eight runs scored, four doubles, three home runs, 11 RBI and a stolen base over six games to earn his second career AL Player of the Week Award. His first came last June. The 24-year-old finished the week first in RBI, total bases (22), extra-base hits (7) and slugging percentage (.917).

This is the Red Sox’ first weekly award since Hanley Ramirez took home AL weekly honors last season (September 18).

Overall, Betts is batting .296 with six home runs and 25 RBI this season.

For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Red Sox assistant general manager Eddie Romero, the man who had a huge hand in signing top prospect Rafael Devers, joins Rob Bradford to talk all things Devers. Romero explains how the organization locked up the talented third baseman, detailing how he has progressed to this point and how long it might be until the 20 year old becomes a major leaguer.

[0:01:44] ... we're coming off the great podcast of Michael Holley talking about it David Ortiz book. And in what we did now is rebates I grabbed Eddie ribeiro assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox off Dave Lewis. And there's no better person you talked the doubt the guy that everybody wants to talk about. For the ...
[0:02:29] ... who had a huge. Huge. Pin in helping bring devers to the Boston Red Sox organization back in 2013. And now it's part of the decision making process in terms of have been inclined the latter. All ...
[0:16:25] ... four weeks I'm not mistaken before we called him up to the Gulf Coast League and he continued. There that was just the inspectors went to show you that it would it was different. When two teams ...
[0:22:39] ... and Eddie Romero the view original Gator. Right date in with the Boston Red Sox obviously the straw that stirred the drink when they made their 1986. World Series Rhein has a youngster with what what was ...






Red Sox assistant general manager Eddie Romero, the man who had a huge hand in signing top prospect Rafael Devers, joins Rob Bradford to talk all things Devers. Romero explains how the organization locked up the talented third baseman, detailing how he has progressed to this point and how long it might be until the 20 year old becomes a major leaguer.

[0:01:44] ... we're coming off the great podcast of Michael Holley talking about it David Ortiz book. And in what we did now is rebates I grabbed Eddie ribeiro assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox off Dave Lewis. And there's no better person you talked the doubt the guy that everybody wants to talk about. For the ...
[0:02:29] ... who had a huge. Huge. Pin in helping bring devers to the Boston Red Sox organization back in 2013. And now it's part of the decision making process in terms of have been inclined the latter. All ...
[0:16:25] ... four weeks I'm not mistaken before we called him up to the Gulf Coast League and he continued. There that was just the inspectors went to show you that it would it was different. When two teams ...
[0:22:39] ... and Eddie Romero the view original Gator. Right date in with the Boston Red Sox obviously the straw that stirred the drink when they made their 1986. World Series Rhein has a youngster with what what was ...






The Red Sox say they're committed to fostering a safe environment at Fenway Park. (David Butler II-USA TODAY Sports)

The Red Sox say they’re committed to fostering a safe environment at Fenway Park. (David Butler II-USA TODAY Sports)

Red Sox ushers are going to look a little different for the rest of the season.

This past home stand against the Rays, Fenway Park staff members wore “kind” and “respectful” pins. According to Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe, they’ll be sporting them for all future home games as well.

The decision to have Red Sox security personnel wear the pins comes on the heels of two reported racial incidents at the ballpark. Two weeks ago, Orioles centerfielder Adam Jones said the N-word was directed at him a “handful” of times. One night later, the Red Sox banned a fan for life for directing a racial epithet towards another person in the stands.

In an interview last week on WEEI’s “Two Outs” podcast, Red Sox president Sam Kennedy said the team is committed to enforcing its zero tolerance policy against hateful language at Fenway Park.

“I don’t worry about it being a slippery slope. It’s the club’s right. We plan on doing it,” he said. “We have an obligation and a responsibility to make sure people who come to Fenway Park, regardless of your religion, your race, your sexual orientation, you feel comfortable at Fenway. That is our job. We need to be held accountable for that. That’s something that’s really important to John Henry, Tom Werner and to me and to the members of our front office. We want our fans to let us know if they feel uncomfortable. Nobody should feel intimidated by coming to a baseball game at Fenway Park. This is a place to come and relax and enjoy and feel comfortable. That’s what I worry about.”

 

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer
Derek Jeter's No. 2 took its place in Monument Park Sunday.   (Elsa/Pool Photo via USA TODAY Sports)

Derek Jeter’s No. 2 took its place in Monument Park Sunday. (Elsa/Pool Photo via USA TODAY Sports)

The Yankees retired Derek Jeter’s number Sunday, so naturally the entire weekend was dedicated to Jeter hero worship. ESPN ran a full slate of Captain Jeets programming and one couple even got engaged. It was a nauseating sight.

Though Jeter is an overrated player –– he only led the league in an offensive category on nine occasions, six of which were either plate appearances or at-bats –– he’s a surefire Hall of Famer. The incessant lauding of his on-field play, while a bit over-the-top, at least is based in some semblance of reality. After all, the guy won five champions and is No. 6 all-time in hits.

But it’s not just enough to call Jeter one of the greatest shortstops of his generation. He must also be held up as a patron saint of baseball, with scores of sportswriters stumbling over themselves to praise his supposed selflessness. But contrary to popular belief, Jeter was not always the consummate teammate. In fact, his last season was an all-time display in self-aggrandizement.

By the time 2014 rolled around, Jeter’s range as a shortstop was roughly equivalent to a traffic cone. His performance was so bad, he was even denied another fraudulent gold glove award.

Despite his obvious limitations, Jeter started 129 games at shortstop. He also hit at the top of the lineup, batting second in 141 contests. Jeter posted a .617 OPS that year, making him one of the least productive shortstops in baseball.

As the season continued, it became apparent Jeter’s “RE2PECT” tour was more important than the Yankees’ postseason hopes. Every team should slot its best hitter second in the lineup, but yet, the Yankees stuck Jeter’s corpse there 87 percent of the time.

If Jeter were truly a baseball martyr, he would’ve told manager Joe Girardi it was not necessary to bat him at the top of the lineup or play him at shortstop nearly every day. He was dead weight in the second half of the season, batting .217 with a .517 OPS in August and September. Not coincidentally, the Yankees fell out of playoff contention.

But much like when Jeter refused to move to third base to accommodate Alex Rodriguez, a superior defensive player, he put his ego ahead of the club’s. The ultimate team player didn’t want to cut his last summer in the spotlight short.

While that’s not the defining part of Jeter’s legacy, it should be mentioned. But it’s been expunged from history, because it doesn’t fit into the Jeter myth.

That might be a bigger victory than the five World Series rings.

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer