FORT MYERS, Fla. — Pablo Sandoval’s trainer his client lost around 40 pounds. Now he’s put out some pictures trying to prove it.

Pete Bommarito, owner of Bommarito Performance Systems, took to Instagram to highlight the weight loss and regimen chronicled in a recent ESPN.com article. (According to Joe Ferrer, a trainer at the training facility, Sandoval entered spring training weighing in just north of 240 pounds.)

Bommarito Performance Systems featured on ESPN! Incredible article on BPS client and 3x World Series Champ Pablo Sandoval (@kfp48) and his journey to being the best shape of his life! Here is an excerpt from the article: ”Having watched Ferrer help Red Sox first baseman Hanley Ramirez overcome a 2015 shoulder injury and revive his career last season, Sandoval decided to enlist the strength and conditioning specialist to oversee his workouts. The days began at 7:30 a.m., Ferrer said, with an hour long "turf workout" to improve Sandoval's agility. After a series of core-strengthening exercises, they moved to the weight room, alternating upper- and lower-body lifts every other day. The Red Sox received frequent progress reports — "Panda watch," if you will — because Ferrer is close with Boston strength and conditioning coach Kiyoshi Momose. Meanwhile, Sandoval put his new wife, Yulimar, in charge of his diet. She worked with a nutritionist to come up with healthier meals for Sandoval and cooked for him throughout the off-season. "Part of [Sandoval's] issues in the past didn't work ethic. It was other aspects of his life when we start talking about nutrition and those types of things," Dombrowski said. "This winter, I would say he was more committed to the total program." Said Ferrer: "I'm actually really pleased with his progress this off-season. I said that to Kiyoshi multiple times. The Red Sox wanted him to get down to, I think, in the 240s, and he's right there. But with him, I think it's just about his strength levels. He's a strong guy. He's powerful. He took our workouts very seriously all off-season. He's definitely ready to play baseball right now.’” Click the link in our bio to read the full article! #KungFuPanda 🐼  #PabloSandoval #Boston Redsox #RedSox #Soxnation #Bommaritos #HanleyRamirez #ElNino #MLB #Baseball #Baseballtraining #miggy #miguelcabrera #Venezuela

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Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — There is a reason why the Red Sox did everything they could to avoid going to an arbitration case over the last 14 years. Just look at what happened to Dellin Betances.

Fernando Abad (Elsa/Getty Images)

Fernando Abad (Elsa/Getty Images)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — There is a reason why the Red Sox did everything they could to avoid going to an arbitration case over the last 14 years. Just look at what happened to Dellin Betances.

Controversy blew up in Yankees camp after the reliever fired back at New York management after team president Randy Levine beat his chest over winning their arbitration decision with Betances. The settlement landed at the team’s number of $3 million after the pitcher’s camp had filed for $5 million.

So, since going to a hearing with Rolando Arrojo in 2002, the Red Sox have managed to steer clear of actually exchanging barbs in front of the three-person arbitration panel, coming the closes when settling with David Ortiz just prior to entering the room in 2012.

But that streak came to an end this offseason when the Red Sox couldn’t settle with reliever Fernando Abad.

So, without a deal in place, Abad flew from the Dominican Republic to the Vinoy Hotel and Resort in St. Petersburg, Fla. to meet up with his agent, Scott Shapiro, for the hearing. He was asking for $2.7 million, while the Red Sox were offering $2 million.

The team won. But evidently, there were no hard feelings. At least nothing close to what has emerged with Betances and the Yankees.

“I went there and didn’t say anything. I just let them talk. They didn’t say anything bad. They filed their part, and my agent filed his part. I wasn’t nervous,” Abad said. “It was fine.”

Having gone through the process, Abad was surprised at the vitriol that came from Betances’ case.

“I thought he was going to win for sure. I was surprised he lost the case,” the Sox lefty said. “[The criticism from the Yankees] is bad. But everybody is different.”

Abad is vying for a spot in the Red Sox’ bullpen after a supbar two-month tenure with the team last season. But with a 95 mph fastball, a revamped changeup and some adjustments to limit potential pitch-tipping, the team is optimistic about the 31-year-old.

“You grade out the raw ability and there’s arm strength and three pitches for strikes,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell. “It’s a matter of consistency.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Andrew Benintendi put on a bunch of muscles this offseason, was named the top-ranked prospect in baseball by both Baseball America and MLB.com, and has already entrenched himself as the nearly-everyday left fielder for the Red Sox after just 127 major league plate appearances.

A lot to live up to.

Benintndi

Andrew Benintendi (Elsa/Getty Images)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Andrew Benintendi put on a bunch of muscles this offseason, was named the top-ranked prospect in baseball by both Baseball America and MLB.com, and has already entrenched himself as the nearly-everyday left fielder for the Red Sox after just 127 major league plate appearances.

A lot to live up to.

Sunday morning, the 22-year-old did nothing to damper expectations.

Facing Brian Johnson on the first day pitchers faced live hitting in batting practice, Benintendi turned on the first pitch he saw from the lefty and deposited it over the right field fence.

As for Johnson, who had impressed the Red Sox enough two years ago to surprisingly put himself in position for major league time (which he ultimately got before suffering an elbow injury), he seems to be back to his old form.

After battling anxiety issues in 2016, Johnson appears to be putting himself back on the radar on the starting pitching depth chart, joining Henry Owens, Roenis Elias and perhaps Kyle Kendrick.

“When you think to spring training of that year [2016], he threw the ball exceptionally well,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell. “Both in terms of the breaking ball he can throw and still with the ability to spin the ball right now, and today, again. The power in that spring training was probably a little more than what we’re seeing, again it’s the early stages of camp, but evaluations are reflective of the time of camp. But he’s been through a lot, physically and with other issues and challenges that he’s faced or were thrown at him. So it’s good to see him on the mound today and again. Much like Pablo [Sandoval], guys that have challenges they’re overcoming, things they’ve experienced, you start to see it play out in games and you get a better read at that time.”

– One bullet dodged came when Rick Porcello took a grounder off the face.

After imploring minor league pitching instructor Bob Kipper to hit harder grounders during the pitchers’ fielding drill, the American League Cy Young Award winner proceeded to fall victim to a bad hop, with the baseball striking just below is right eye.

Porcello went on to continue the drill, along with throwing batting practice, and, other than a little swelling, showed no ill-effects from the incident.

– Among the matchups during the live batting practice were Pablo Sandoval getting a chance to hit right-handed against David Price.

Sandoval is continuing his quest to remain a switch-hitter despite a 2015 which saw him go just 2-for-41 against lefties before taking on southpaws from the left side.

“There has been some and a lot of work done on the right-hand side,” Farrell said. “He went from the first year being here where his swing was a little bit abbreviated or cut off and the results were reflective of that and he went solely left-handed. Then spent a lot of work prior to last season on the right-handed side, so until we see it in games, all of his actions, including the right side of the plate. He looks more free, more natural movement to all his actions so we’ll see how that translates to games. but I would fully expect him to be a switch-hitter from the get go.”

– Blake Swihart calmed some nerves when it came to his throwing, managing to throw back to Owens during the lefty’s bullpen session with few issues.

Swihart, who was having well-publicized problems throwing the ball back to the pitcher Thursday and Friday, was spot-on during warm-ups with Owens, and then had few issues once hitters stepped in. He did air-mail the 6-foot-7 pitcher once, threw low a few times, and lowered the velocity on his return tosses as the session progressed. But overall, the performance didn’t amp up any concerns.

– Other batting practice matchups Sunday included: Porcello vs. Dustin Pedroia and Hanley Ramirez; David Price vs. Sandoval and Chris Young; Owens vs. Xander Bogaerts and Mookie Betts.

Young did take Price deep over the center field fence during the third round of the starter’s 30-pitch BP session.

“He looks good,” Young said. “First day we are all just trying to get our work in right now. It was nice seeing him back on the mound and get back in the box with a helmet on again, put on shin guards and feel like a baseball player again.”

One noticeable difference were the arms of the lanky Owens, who said he put on almost 30 pounds from this time last season, when he weighed in at 202 pounds.

– Monday is a big day for a couple of pitchers, Brandon Workman and Steven Wright.

Workman is looking to find his way back to the major leagues after a variety of health issues, including Tommy John surgery. He will be throwing his first bullpen session to hitters, having not faced major league hitters since 2015 spring training.

Wright isn’t throwing to hitters, but will take the mound for the first time for his first bullpen session of the spring.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Bradford checks in from spring training to give us all the media dirt he can dig up...oh, and talk some baseball too.
Rob Bradford is joined by Lou Merloni to talk life in spring training, his toiletries, sleeping arrangements, and facing off with Red Sox personnel that he might have been critical of. Rob and Lou also get into the dynamic of electronic and print media when it comes to ripping the Red Sox.

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Time is of the essence for any baseball family. So, with a brief window to take advantage of the availability of spring training, Dustin Pedroia carved out a few days to reunite with his wife, Kelli, and his three young sons, Dylan, Cole and Brooks.

Kelli and the kids flew from Arizona for the weekend before having to head back for school, leaving the family apart for more than a month.

So, with the Pedroias all in attendance — with the sons ranging in age from 7 years old to 2 years old — it was tough to miss their presence.

FORT MYERS, FL- FEBRUARY 18: Dustin Pedroia #15 of the Boston Red Sox takes a break from practice to talk to his sons Dylan, 7, Cole, 4, and Brooks, 2,  on February 18, 2017 at jetBlue Park in Fort Myers, Florida.   (Photo by Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images)

FORT MYERS, FL- FEBRUARY 18: Dustin Pedroia #15 of the Boston Red Sox takes a break from practice to talk to his sons Dylan, 7, Cole, 4, and Brooks, 2, on February 18, 2017 at jetBlue Park in Fort Myers, Florida. (Photo by Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images)

FORT MYERS, FL- FEBRUARY 18:  Dustin Pedroia #15 of the Boston Red Sox gets a hug from his son Cole, 4, during a break in practice on February 18, 2017 at jetBlue Park in Fort Myers, Florida.   (Photo by Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images)

FORT MYERS, FL- FEBRUARY 18: Dustin Pedroia #15 of the Boston Red Sox gets a hug from his son Cole, 4, during a break in practice on February 18, 2017 at jetBlue Park in Fort Myers, Florida. (Photo by Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images)

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Red Sox chairman Tom Werner dropped a little Patriots and Tom Brady reference on his team Friday morning during the organization’s kick off to spring training get-together.

“Different sport, but I guess he was trying to use it as some motivation,” said Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr.

Jackie Bradley Jr. (Winslow Townsend/USA Today Sports)

Jackie Bradley Jr. (Winslow Townsend/USA Today Sports)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Red Sox chairman Tom Werner dropped a little Patriots and Tom Brady reference on his team Friday morning during the organization’s kick off to spring training get-together.

“Different sport, but I guess he was trying to use it as some motivation,” said Red Sox outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr.

So, while we’re talking Patriots …

With more than a handful of Pats either flat-out saying, or at least suggesting, they will be skipping the team’s trip to the White House, presumably due to the policies of current President Donald Trump, the topic came up in the Red Sox’ clubhouse.

So, if there is another Red Sox championship, and the opportunity to visit the White House presents itself, would Bradley Jr. go?

“If my team is going, yes, I’m going,” he said.

The Red Sox outfielder, who clarifies, “I don’t like politics, not even a little bit,” has already been to the White House twice. The first time came when he went with the national champion South Carolina baseball team. The second, of course, was in 2013 with the Red Sox.

From Bradley Jr.’s point of view, even though enjoyed meeting Barack Obama twice, it wouldn’t be about who is hosting. The motivation for attending, he explained, is to celebrate how the team got to that point.

“The reason why we’re going there is because we did something together as a team. The White House is cool,” he said. “I’m with my team.

“How many people can say they’ve been to the White House? That alone. There is a lot history there, and I’m a big fan of architecture. I think the whole thing is unique.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford