The Red Sox were swept at home by the Yankees in a series lasting three games or more for the first time since August of 2006.

With how powerful the Red Sox’ offense is, they rarely are out of any given game, but when they have to make up an 8-run difference, that’s asking too much.

Red Sox starter Joe Kelly couldn’t make it out of the fifth inning as he allowed five runs before being removed with two outs in the fifth, as the Yankees beat the Red Sox 8-5 Sunday night.

The Yankees completed their first sweep of three or more games at Fenway Park since 2006 with their win over the Red Sox (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

The Yankees completed their first sweep of three or more games at Fenway Park since 2006 with their win over the Red Sox (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

With how powerful the Red Sox’ offense is, they rarely are out of any given game, but when they have to make up an 8-run difference, that’s asking too much.

Red Sox starter Joe Kelly couldn’t make it out of the fifth inning as he allowed five runs before being removed with two outs in the fifth, as the Yankees beat the Red Sox 8-5 Sunday night.

The Yankees swept the weekend series — it was their first series sweep of three or more games at Fenway Park since 2006.

The right-hander went 4 2/3 innings allowing five runs on nine hits, while not walking a batter and striking out three. It was the second time over his five starts where he didn’t make it out of the fifth inning, and now four out of the five Red Sox starters can say the same.

Trailing 8-0, the Red Sox scored five times in the sixth inning to make it interesting, capped by a three-run home run by Mike Napoli. The homer cut the deficit to three at 8-5, and snapped a 1-for-11 slump, but that was the closest the Red Sox could get, although they did load the bases against Andrew Miller in the ninth.

The Red Sox couldn’t get much going off Yankees starter Adam Warren until the five-run fifth. Warren finished going 5 2/3 innings, allowing four runs on four hits. It was his third straight going 5 2/3 inning, the longest he’s gone in a start in his career.

Warnings were issued to both benches in the top of the eighth after Edward Mujica hit Jacoby Ellsbury with a pitch. This comes after Hanley Ramirez was hit in the top of the sixth. Ramirez took exception, walking slowly to first base with home plate umpire Jeff Nelson and firing his bat against the wall.

SWENSON GRANITE WORKS ROCK SOLID PERFORMER OF THE GAME: Ellsbury. The former Red Sox reached base six times as he went 4-for-4 with a walk and was hit by a pitch, while scoring two runs. Vote on the Rock Solid Performer of the week and enter to win a VIP Boston Baseball Experience at weei.com/rocksolid.

Here is what went wrong (and right) in the Red Sox’ loss:

WHAT WENT WRONG

— After three straight quality starts (for the first time all season) Kelly couldn’t make it out of the fifth inning. Red Sox starters have now allowed five runs or more in eight of the 25 starts this season, 32 percent of the starts.

— The Red Sox couldn’t get anything going against Warren early on. They went through the first turn through the order without a hit, and didn’t hit a ball out of the infield in the process. Mookie Betts led the top of the fourth off with a double to left-center.

Craig Breslow was terrible in relief. In the sixth inning he faced three batters, all recording hits, capped off by the last batter he would face in Brett Gardner who crushed a three-run home run into the Red Sox bullpen.

— Daniel Nava went 0-for-3 with a walk. He is now 0 for his last 18 and 1 for his last 27.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

David Ortiz had a wall-ball double in the sixth, scoring Dustin Pedroia for the first Red Sox run. The hit extended Ortiz’s hit streak to six games.

— Pedroia singled before scoring on Ortiz’s double, which extended his own hit streak to seven games.

— Mujica gave the Red Sox a solid relief effort, as he went 2 1/3 innings, allowing just one hit, and hit a batter, while striking out one. It was the longest he had ever gone in a game in a Red Sox uniform.

— Dalier Hinojosa made his major league debut in the eighth inning and struck out Alex Rodriguez, the first batter he faced.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Torey Lovullo owns a very tiny footnote in the agate type of history ‘€“ when Alex Rodriguez debuted at Fenway Park with

Torey Lovullo

Torey Lovullo

Torey Lovullo owns a very tiny footnote in the agate type of history ‘€“ when Alex Rodriguez debuted at Fenway Park with the Mariners in 1994, Lovullo was the player jettisoned to make room for him on the roster.

Just call it Six Degrees of Torey.

“It’s a little bit of useless information: I was the guy sent down for A-Rod to start his career,” the Red Sox bench coach said before the team hosted Rodriguez and the Yankees on Sunday night.

Lovullo was coming off the best season of his career with the Angels in 1993 (.251-6-30) when California waived him at the end of spring training. The Mariners signed the utilityman on April 1 and he remained in the big leagues until July 8, when manager Lou Piniella summoned Lovullo to his hotel room in Boston to break the news that he’d be heading to Triple A Calgary.

“I was obviously a guy that was on a different career path than A-Rod at the time,” Lovullo said. “I was in the big leagues and the young kid was doing well. I think he came up from Double A to the big leagues to start his career and it worked out great until the strike.”

Because Lovullo spent that spring with the Angels, he had never seen A-Rod in person, but the 18-year-old’s reputation preceeded him.

“He was a great prospect,” Lovullo said. “Nothing but good things were in his future and it was time to start his clock. I was very well aware of who he was. It was going to be a short time before he got to the big leagues. It came at my expense, unfortunately.”

Their paths would cross once more later that season. With the strike looming, the Mariners recalled Lovullo and sent Rodriguez to Triple A, where he could continue to develop. Two years later, he was an All-Star and batting champ at age 21.

“The major league side of things in 1994 went on strike, the minor league side was still playing, business as usual,” Lovullo said. “In order for him to keep playing, they once again flip-flopped us and put me in the big leagues to go on strike and put him in the minor leagues to keep playing.”

Nearly 20 years later, with Rodriguez closing in on his 40th birthday and looking for career home run No. 661 and sole possession of fourth place on the all-time list, the two are once again together in Boston.

“I don’t think he even knows my name, to tell you the truth,” Lovullo said. “Obviously it worked out pretty well for him, right?”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

After the Red Sox claimed infielder Luis Jimenez off waivers on Sunday, it’s likely the former Milwaukee Brewer gets added to the 25-man roster on Monday.

With Jimenez being added, the team would be able to get back to the standard 13 position players, with the corresponding move likely a pitcher.

After the Red Sox claimed infielder Luis Jimenez off waivers on Sunday, it’s likely the former Milwaukee Brewer gets added to the 25-man roster on Monday.

With Jimenez being added, the team would be able to get back to the standard 13 position players, with the corresponding move likely a pitcher.

After the Red Sox claimed infielder Luis Jimenez off waivers on Sunday, it’s likely the former Milwaukee Brewer gets added to the 25-man roster on Monday.

With Jimenez being added, the team would be able to get back to the standard 13 position players, with the corresponding move likely a pitcher.

“Right-handed utility guy that we like the defense particularly at third if that comes into play,” manager John Farrell said. “He’s also played some second, he’s played some first. Feel like he can play shortstop in a short look. it gives us some more flexibility with Brock [Holt] and Daniel Nava and hopefully the chance to get back to 13 position players.”

Jimenez appeared in 15 games for Milwaukee this season, going 1-for-15 with a run scored and a walk.  Both of his starts came at third base (seven total games) and he also appeared defensively at second base once. He’€™s coming off a career year at Class AAA Salt Lake in 2014, hitting .286 with 21 home runs and 76 runs batted in.

Farrell added Pawtucket utility infielder Jeff Bianchi is coming off an injury, so the need for another utility infielder in the system was there.

With Jimenez added, Farrell noted one of the benefits is it gives Holt more opportunity in the outfield, not having to worry about backing up any of the infield positions.

“It gives us that flexibility, yes,” he said. “I can’t say that that’s the definite approach going forward, but at least it provides the opportunity or the option available.”

Shane Victorino (hamstring) is eligible to come off the disabled list Friday in Toronto, but that won’t happen. The team was never really considering that an option with the new turf and the reported affects of playing there.

He will likely rehab next weekend in Portland — Friday and Saturday for sure, with the possibility of Sunday as well.

“With the schedule both Pawtucket and Portland on the road, we’re probably going to push Vic’s live game at-bats back a little bit later in the week, but it will also allow us to ramp up the intensity and the volume over the next couple of days here at Fenway,” Farrell said. “There’s been a lot of discussion, what would be best, getting three at-bats in the DH role or really ramp up the volume. And we’re going to keep him here. It still allows us to look at the second leg of the road trip as an activation.

“We didn’t really have any thoughts of activating Vic in Toronto because of the turf and the reports of what’s affecting players’ legs and low back with the new turf up there. So we didn’t want to risk that. So that kind of points more toward Oakland provided there are no setbacks.”

OTHER RED SOX NOTES

— With Sandy Leon and young prospect Blake Swihart as the only catchers on the roster, it appears the Red Sox don’t appear to have any plans to add to the group from outside the organization, at least now.

“I can’t speak to might be contemplated outside the organization, I honestly don’t know. But for the time being we’re going with a really good young, athletic catcher in Blake Swihart,” Farrell said. “There’s no determination on the split of workload between the two (Leon and Swihart). But Blake’s back in there tonight.”

As for how much playing time he will receive, it seems like he’ll be back behind the plate more often than not. With starting Sunday night, Swihart has now started in both games he’s been active for.

“We want to get Blake in the flow of things as quick as we can, and yet recognize to be a little bit sensitive to where they may be the need for a breather,” Farrell said. “No different than Mookie [Betts] in center field or any other young player that comes here. I will say this, as a rookie catcher who is also a switch-hitter, his plate is extremely full.”

— With Farrell being a former pitching coach, and the issues the Red Sox pitching has had this season — last in the majors with a starting pitching ERA of 5.52 — it’s been wondered how much work Farrell has done with them in addition to pitching coach Juan Nieves.

“I would say that interaction is regular,” said Farrell. “Juan and I work very close together. We have a different set of experiences so we share some thoughts and views on what you see in a given moment and then arrive at a game plan. Or at least if you need to adjust a game plan, that can take place.

“You make sure that you do have those opportunities. There’€™s another set of obligations I recognize with this position. But there’€™s probably been more opportunities of late where there’€™s been some one-on-one conversations. There’€™s been [conversations] with Juan in the bullpen during bullpens. That’€™s ongoing.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

After making his major league debut Saturday, Blake Swihart is back behind the plate again Sunday night against the Yankees. The Red Sox will be looking to avoid a three-game sweep.

Blake Swihart

Blake Swihart

After making his major league debut Saturday, Blake Swihart is back behind the plate again Sunday night against the Yankees. The Red Sox will be looking to avoid a three-game sweep.

Daniel Nava will start for the first time this weekend in right field against Yankees right-hander Adam Warren, who is 1-1 with a 4.35 ERA.

Otherwise it’s a standard lineup for the Red Sox, who will send Joe Kelly to the mound.

For an extensive look at the matchups, click here.

1. Mookie Betts, CF
2. Dustin Pedroia, 2B
3. David Ortiz, DH
4. Hanley Ramirez, LF
5. Pablo Sandoval, 3B
6. Mike Napoli, 1B
7. Daniel Nava, RF
8. Xander Bogaerts, SS
9. Blake Swihart, C
Joe Kelly, RHP

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable