Jonny Gomes said he's aware of, but not alarmed by, the possibility of being dealt. (AP)

Jonny Gomes said he’s aware of, but not alarmed by, the possibility of being dealt. (AP)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Who’s next? It’s a question that hovers over the Red Sox roster right now, and will continue to do so until the trade deadline passes on Thursday. All potential free agents are on high alert, given the Red Sox’ stated intention of putting themselves in the best position possible come April 2015.

Outfielder Jonny Gomes, in the second season of the two-year, $10 million contract he signed with the Red Sox on his birthday following the 2012 campaign, is aware of that fact. The possibility is not alarming, as Gomes already has experienced a mid-year relocation, going from the Reds to the Nationals for a pair of minor leaguers in 2011.

The 33-year-old, hitting .240/.333/.363 with six homers, but a robust .315/.410/.450 line against lefties, clearly wouldn’t be surprised if he were dealt to a contender in need of a right-handed bat with some thump. He’s not eager to be dealt, but he’s prepared if it happens, and suggests that his on-field performance won’t be impacted by the team for whom he spends the rest of the year.

“The first time I got traded, it was extremely mixed emotions of a team, not necessarily giving up, but feels you’re replaceable. At the same time, out of all the guys available in the trade market, this other team picked you,” said Gomes. “You never want to be given up on. But there are situations where you’re not being given up on but the business side stands out.

“This happens every year. This isn’t my first rodeo with this and me,” he added. “You truly have got to wait for the moment, play for the moment. I’ve seen guys get wrapped up in it and fail. I’ve seen guys try too hard. I’ve seen guys shine, get traded and they go somewhere else and lay an egg because they were putting on a front. That’s one thing that won’t happen with me.

“I signed a two-year deal here. I would love to fulfill that agreement that I signed,” he added. “But I feel the same way that [Jake Peavy, dealt to the Giants on Saturday] probably feels. I truly hope that if I leave, it would be to help the organization.”

Whether traded or not, Gomes said that he represents a known commodity — whether to the Red Sox or a team acquiring him.

“One thing I can guarantee, if I’ve got a uni, I’m going all out. I truly don’t have that in me to play any different, whether it’s the trade deadline or not the trade deadline, 20 games out or 20 games up,” said Gomes. “I’ve been here a year and a half. I don’t think people have seen any difference in styles of play for me — swing hard, run hard and overly aggressive mistakes. At the end of the day, I’ll take that over the other way.”

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier

The weekend offered a glimpse into some of the challenges John Farrell, Red Sox have had to face this season. (AP)ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- It is difficult to comprehend the place where the Red Sox have arrived. The dynamic surrounding the team bears no resemblance to what was accomplished -- and how it was accomplished -- last year.



ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — When David Ortiz launched a three-run homer that ultimately propelled the Red Sox to a 3-2 victory over the Rays. He enjoyed it. His opponent did not.

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — When David Ortiz launched a three-run homer that ultimately propelled the Red Sox to a 3-2 victory over the Rays. He enjoyed it. His opponent did not.

Ortiz decimated an elevated Chris Archer changeup and sent it rocketing into the far reaches of the right field bleachers in the Tropicana Dome. He admired his work, then flung his bat to punctuate his blast before circling the bases. In an echo of comments made earlier this season by Archer’s teammate, David Price, Archer (a 25-year-old who has appeared in 49 career big league games), suggested that Ortiz acted without a proper sense of decorum.

“I think it was a perfect example of what Price said,” Archer told reporters. “All of my interactions with him off the field have been good, but when it comes to him on the field, I don’t know what makes him think that he can showboat the way he does, and then nobody can retaliate or look at him in a funny way or nobody can pitch him inside.”

Ortiz shrugged off the criticism, and suggested Archer — given his lack of big league experience — wasn’t the right one to level such judgments.

“Tie game, something like that, you put your team ahead, you enjoy,” said Ortiz. “What can I tell you man? Players in today’€™s game are too sensitive about things. I’€™ll just leave it like that. I think he’€™s a good pitcher. I think he’€™s got great stuff. He’€™s a guy that I think is going to be pretty good. But it takes some time to get to that level.

“There’€™s always going to comments out there. He’€™s not the right guy to be saying that. He’€™s got two days in the league, you can’€™t be just [whining] and complaining about [stuff] like that.”

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — David Ortiz, who slammed his fifth homer of the seven-game road trip on Sunday to propel the Red Sox to a 3-2 victory over the Rays, took stock of his team at a time when it’s prepared to return to Fenway Park nine games below .500, with rumors swirling of players who might get moved in the coming four days. Ortiz made clear that his preference is to see the Red Sox keep Jon Lester and work to regain their footing with the left-hander.

“Like I always say, I’€™m just another player here where I’€™ve got no choice but to agree with whatever,” Ortiz said. “The front office is hard to do and they’€™ve been talking about trading Jon. That sounds like a rebuilding, that type of situation. I don’€™t know. There’€™s not much I can say about it but they’€™ve probably got their reason to do it. Hopefully it doesn’€™t happen. Lester is one of the best pitchers in the game. That’€™s a keeper. … Hopefully he sticks around and keeps on giving us those good seasons that he always does give us.”

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With the trade deadline now four days away, Red Sox left-hander Jon Lester remains one of the most fascinating candidates on the market. The left-hander is at the point where he wouldn’t be surprised by a trade, but the Sox would have to get tremendous value in return for him.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With the trade deadline now four days away, Red Sox left-hander Jon Lester remains one of the most fascinating candidates on the market. The left-hander is at the point where he wouldn’t be surprised by a trade, but the Sox would have to get tremendous value in return for him.

Jon Lester maintains that he would want to return to the Red Sox even if traded. (AP)

Jon Lester maintains that he would want to return to the Red Sox even if traded. (AP)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With the trade deadline now four days away, Red Sox left-hander Jon Lester remains one of the most fascinating candidates on the market. The left-hander is at the point where he wouldn’t be surprised by a trade, but the Sox would have to get tremendous value in return for him.

That being the case, it’s worth noting that one way the team could get greater value for him in a trade would be if he negotiated an extension with the club that acquired him. If landed as a multi-year contributor, the potential prospect return for Lester could increase considerably.

However, it’s a road that Lester is unlikely to go down. He reiterated the notion that his preference is to be with the Red Sox in 2015 and beyond — even if traded for the duration of this year — and so he finds it hard to fathom that he would be able to make a long-term decision about playing in another city during the very narrow window afforded by the trade deadline — particularly given that Lester said he doesn’t plan to make a decision driven purely by securing top dollar, but instead wants to ensure that he is happy with all facets of any team with which he signs.

“Probably not, just based on the fact that going in, you know nothing about it,” Lester said of his willingness to consider an extension. “I think sometimes you can get blinded by success. Especially you come from here, right now, we’re not playing so good — you get traded to a contender, we’re back on the winning trail, everybody is happy when you’re winning. It’s always roses. You can never see the bad when you’re winning. I wouldn’t say never, but it would have to be ideal — you would have to fall into a perfect, perfect scenario.

“But my ultimate goal would be to come back here. That would be, like I said the other day, I know that’s hard to do. I know it doesn’t happen very often. But I understand it. I get it.

“Money doesn’t buy you happiness. There’s some guys, that drives them. That’s great,” said Lester. “For me, I want to be happy. I want to be comfortable. I want to be in a place that wants me and appreciates what I do.”

One additional note: One industry source suggested that there has been no meaningful dialogue about a rumored trade possibility involving the Red Sox and Dodgers that would have the Sox sending Lester to Los Angeles with Matt Kemp coming back to Boston.

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier
Joe & Dave talked to the Sox rookie catcher, who had a hit and a couple of great plays in the win that closed out the series.
Joe & Dave talked to the Sox rookie catcher, who had a hit and a couple of great plays in the win that closed out the series.

[0:00:18] ... up to them but on a strike and c'mon you know the strike zone the. -- you must take a lot of pride in being able to occasionally get a strike three your. For your pitcher ...
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