David Ortiz came up with the perfect tribute to Pedro Martinez.

David Ortiz (2 HRs, 7 RBIs) led the Red Sox over the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

David Ortiz (2 HRs, 7 RBIs) led the Red Sox over the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

David Ortiz came up with the perfect tribute to Pedro Martinez.

Hours after the Red Sox pitching great was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, Ortiz, inspired by a 30-minute bilingual speech, went out and drove in a career-high seven runs and belted two three-run homers in an 11-1 pasting of the Tigers at Fenway Park.

“I was very emotional today looking at the induction,” Ortiz said. “It’s something that was remarkable. You never know what is going to pop out. Pedro, I got tears coming out when I saw Pedro talking because I know the man. I know everything that he went through in his career. I used to see that with Pedro after games. He starts telling me stories about things. All the stories he used to tell me made me a better human being, made me a better player. He was good. He wrote a book about it.

“He let it fly during the speech because for a lot of people, I know some of the fans, fans that don’t follow him. They thought that Pedro was as crazy as he looks sometimes when he was pitching. Pedro was the most unbelievable human being I have been around. Pedro is a Christian man. He is a man that thanks God every single minute of his life. Just watching during the speech, there was no doubt about the human being that I know that was out there letting people know how the game gets to be played.”

Ortiz has struggled this season, as has the team. But on a night like Sunday, Ortiz could only imagine what Martinez would be doing to him in the dugout.

“He’d be hugging me all night,” Ortiz said. “Pedro, man, I’m telling you, he’s special. He’s somebody I always love having around because Pedro is nothing but positive stuff coming out. I’m pretty sure everybody in New England enjoyed his induction today.”

Ortiz now has 19 homers, raised his average eight points to .243 and his slugging percentage 24 points to .468 with Sunday’s effort. He said he has been keeping in touch with Martinez this season, as the former pitcher continues to inspire him, even through difficult times.

“Always. Always. Always,” Ortiz said. “It’s a long season. And you work extremely hard to have a good season every year but this is the kind of year where things are going in a different direction, and not just for me but for everybody. But in my case, I just keep on working and keep on trying every night to do something.”

Ortiz and Martinez were teammates for just two seasons but that was long enough for Ortiz to understand the man and long enough to capture their only World Series title together in 2004. But Sunday, Ortiz also got some insight to the other three players inducted, as he also paid close attention to the speeches of John Smoltz (a teammate in 2009), Craig Biggio and Randy “Big Unit” Johnson.

“I played with Pedro,” Ortiz said. “You guys [media, fans] know what my relationship with Pedro is. Smoltz,I got to know him a little bit. But once you get to listen to those guys talking, it just takes things to another level. Big Unit today talking was like I’m his No. 1 fan from now on. Those lives he touched. There’s something the fans put a lot of attention to it. Sometimes, people judge you for the things you do on the field and things stay like that. Once you off the field and out of the uniform, there’s a human being behind the whole thing. That’s something I experienced tonight.

“Today was a day where emotions were pretty much going all over the place in this clubhouse. Myself, I’m not going to lie to you, I was watching the induction, watched pretty much the whole thing. It was very emotional. Today, I got to know guys through their speech. You don’t really know them.”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia
Eduardo Rodriguez went seven innings allowing one run in the Red Sox' 11-1 win over the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

Eduardo Rodriguez went seven innings allowing one run in the Red Sox‘ 11-1 win over the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

As manager John Farrell put it after Sunday’s game, it’s been an “interesting” first two months in the major leagues for left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez.

But, minus three poor outings where he’s battled tipping pitches, Rodriguez is making history.

The left-hander went seven innings allowing one run on just three hits, while walking one and striking out six in picking up his sixth win of the season in the Red Sox’ 11-1 rout over the Tigers Sunday night.

With that performance, Rodriguez’s ERA sits at 4.26, but if you take away his three poor starts where he’s allowed 22 earned runs in 9 2/3 innings, his ERA is only 1.23 over eight starts.

“This has been an interesting roughly two months that he’s been here,” Farrell said. “He’s been challenged at times in between the lines and it’s the greatest teacher that we have. There’s been some adjustments in his delivery. That’s an on-going situation and he continues to adapt and evolve. It shows his aptitude and his attitude to make those adjustments.”

After allowing seven runs, including two home runs, over 1 2/3 innings in last Monday’s loss to the Angels, Rodriguez responded in a big way Sunday. He only allowed one hit to the first 14 batters he faced and his only mistake came in the fourth inning when he allowed a solo homer to Nick Castellanos.

“I think the last one I tried to go too quickly to home plate and made my fastballs in the strike zone,” Rodriguez said. “Today I just got under control to control my fastball where I want. That’€™s what I think made it go better.”

In six night games this season, he’s 5-0 with a major league-leading 1.14 ERA (min. 30 innings). Rodriguez has allowed one earned run or less in seven of his first 11 starts in the majors, becoming the first AL left-hander to do so since at least 1918.

“I just go start to start,” he said. “That’€™s what I think makes me change after the other start. Just thinking, continue to throw strikes and try to get outs.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Cole Hamels, shown during Saturday's no-hitter, shouldn't be on the Red Sox' radar anymore.</p>
<div class=



Joe & Dave talked to the Sox designated hitter, who hit two home runs and drove in seven runs in the win over the Tigers.

[0:00:52] ... of something good. They're very happy to go to Cooperstown that they Pedro Martinez mentioned you in his speech yeah that's quite an honor in this. Said he hopes you join in sometimes. Right near Cooperstown ...
[0:02:29] ... RBIs list you passed Dwight Evans for fourth all time of the Red Sox RBI analyst. You have 485 home runs the next guy in front of you is Lou Gehrig. Soon you start to hear about on think above all that what goes through your mind. And getting all past. That's not. You know a fifth of those are name they used to be in the baseball cards in this public those that question. When they Thermage and you know amber and if those guys you relate man with scored ...




Joe & Dave talked to the Sox designated hitter, who hit two home runs and drove in seven runs in the win over the Tigers.

[0:00:52] ... something good. There are very happy to go to Cooperstown that they Pedro Martinez mentioned you in his speech yeah that's quite an honor and a said he hopes you join in sometime. Right near Cooperstown ...
[0:02:47] ... know a fifth of those are names that you feel in the baseball cards in this stuff really value those that put it. When they start mentioning you know amber and if those guys you relate ...
[0:03:34] ... think your comments that are just so appropriate about the Pedro and Randy Johnson Biggio had been smoltz and everything you said about the hall of fame today in the we wanted to be there when ...





After scoring just three runs in the first two games of the series and averaging 1.77 runs a game since the All-Star break, it was a matter of time before the Red Sox offense exploded.

After scoring just three runs in the first two games of the series and averaging 1.77 runs a game since the All-Star break, it was a matter of time before the Red Sox offense exploded.

David Ortiz (home run, 4 RBIs, led the Red Sox over the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

David Ortiz‘s career-high seven RBIs, the Red Sox routed the Tigers Sunday night. (Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)

After scoring just three runs in the first two games of the series and averaging 1.77 runs a game since the All-Star break, it was a matter of time before the Red Sox offense exploded.

Led by David Ortiz’s two home runs and career-high seven RBIs, the Red Sox beat the Tigers 11-1 Sunday night at Fenway Park. As a team, the Red Sox finished with a season-high 20 hits with every member of the starting lineup recording one.

With the game tied at one in fifth, Ortiz crushed a Shane Greene offering over the Tigers bullpen for a three-run homer, giving the Sox a 4-1 lead at the time. Ortiz added another homer in the seventh, this one over the Green Monster for another three-run homer. It was his first multi-home run game of the season and 48th of his career.

Ortiz finished the game 4-for-5 with seven RBIs. The seven RBI were a career-high and he became the first Red Sox player to have seven RBIs in a game since Will Middlebrooks last September.

The Red Sox scored a total of four times in the fifth, three in the sixth and three more in the seventh. Mike Napoli had RBI hits in both the fifth and sixth. The first baseman has reached base in nine straight games and over his last seven games he’s batting .429.

The impressive offensive showing took some of the spotlight off Eduardo Rodriguez, who bounced back nicely after a tough outing last Monday against the Angels where he allowed seven runs in 1 2/3 innings.

Rodriguez went seven innings, allowing one run on three hits, while walking just one and striking out six. He’s now allowed one earned run or less in seven of his first 11 starts becoming the first left-handed in AL history to do so since at least 1918.

The Sox scored their first run of the game in the fourth inning on a Blake Swihart RBI double, which scored Hanley Ramirez, who had singled to open the frame. The lead didn’t last long as Rodriguez allowed a leadoff homer to Nick Castellanos to open the fifth. It was crushed to dead-center field for his 10th home run of the season.

Here is what went right (and wrong) in the Red Sox’ win:

WHAT WENT RIGHT

— Xander Bogaerts went 4-for-5 in the win, all singles. It was his fifth career four-hit game with four coming this season. Against the Tigers this weekend he was 8-for-14 (.571).

— Pablo Sandoval snapped an 0-for-19 skid with his single in the second inning. Overall, he went 2-for-4 in the game.

— Ramirez’s single in the fourth extended his hit streak to six games. Overall he went 2-for-4 in the game and in that six-game span he’s batting .364.

— Brock Holt entered the game in a mini 0-for-6 slump, but he went 2-for-3 with a run scored, although he left the game after the fifth inning with left knee tightness. He’s batting .400 in his last six games against the Tigers.

WHAT WENT WRONG

— Nothing. It was one of the best nights at Fenway Park all season.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Rounding first base hasn’t been too kind to Red Sox second basemen this season.