Bradford and Tomase are talking about the Cleveland Indians signing of Edwin Encarnacion. They also talk about Eduardo Rodriguez injuring the knee that caused him to miss time in the 2016 with the Red Sox, and injury risks in the WBC's potential impact in MLB's regular season
Pete Sheppard, Rob Bradford, and John Tomase are talking about Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame voting process and candidates for enshrinement.
Bradford and Tomase are talking about the Cleveland Indians signing of Edwin Encarnacion. They also talk about Eduardo Rodriguez injuring the knee that caused him to miss time in the 2016 with the Red Sox, and injury risks in the WBC's potential impact in MLB's regular season

[0:02:31] ... yet forty home runs a year. For the next three years would Edwin Encarnacion. And you're gonna do it this way in you can figured out and I saw someone today do zips in this in ...
[0:14:19] ... seemed. I and it seemed to meet with no pitching available with Rich Hill off the market and you know sale traded. That someone would look at buckles on one year thing NC that's worth. More ...
[0:15:34] ... someone tweet this now. That. You had three closers. Making more than Edwin Encarnacion. Yet while law is that's a man is insane and and just to go back real quick thinker nasty and so. The ...
[0:16:26] ... I won after the break I wanna get back in that the Edwin Encarnacion and and dynamic because not only if the conversation about. Should the Red Sox have gone after room. It's why they didn't ...






Pete Sheppard, Rob Bradford, and John Tomase are talking about Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame voting process and candidates for enshrinement.

Blame the World Baseball Classic.

Eduardo Rodriguez (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Eduardo Rodriguez (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Blame the World Baseball Classic.

According to the Boston Globe, Eduardo Rodriguez “tweaked” the same right knee that made the Red Sox’ pitcher miss the first two months of 2016 while pitching for Navegantes del Magallanes in the Venezuelan Winter League. Rodriguez reportedly left after the first inning after feeling discomfort in the knee.

Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski told the Globe in an email, “He tweaked his knee last night pitching. It doesn’t appear to be anything serious.”

The reason Rodriguez has been participating in the winter league was to prepare for the upcoming WBC, with the lefty slated to play for his native Venezuela.

Considering Rodriguez was coming off a season that was curtailed due to both the knee injury suffered in spring training, and a hamstring ailment, it appeared a questionable decision to jump-start his offseason training with the winter ball stint.

It will be interesting to see if the setback gives Rodriguez second thoughts about playing in the WBC. Considering he will be in competition for a spot in the starting rotation — with Rodriguez, Steven Wright and Drew Pomeranz all positioning for two spots — it would seem to behoove the 23-year-old to play on the cautious side and remain with the Red Sox throughout the entirety of spring training.

Rodriguez made 20 starts for the Red Sox in 2016, totaling a 4.71 ERA. He did post a 3.24 ERA in his final 14 starts after returning from the minor leagues.

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Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Who knew the biggest impact Bud Selig had on Major League Baseball would be getting inducted into the Hall of Fame?

That’s exactly what’s happening when looking at how things are unfolding in voting for entrance into Cooperstown, so far.

Roger Clemens might get into the Hall of Fame, after all. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Roger Clemens might get into the Hall of Fame, after all. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Who knew the biggest impact Bud Selig had on Major League Baseball would be getting inducted into the Hall of Fame?

That’s exactly what’s happening when looking at how things are unfolding in voting for entrance into Cooperstown, so far.

Thanks to the excellent work of Ryan Thibodaux — who compiles HOF votes as they are surfaced on social media — we know that there is a pretty significant trend with 25 percent of the ballots accounted for. All of a sudden, both Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens seemingly actually have a chance.

Both Bonds and Clemens are at an identical 70.3 percent, with all candidates needing at least 75 percent for induction. So far, this way of thinking is in stark contrast to what previously transpired last year, when both players were punished for their association with performance enhancing drugs. In 2016, Clemens landed at 45.2 percent, while Bonds came in at 44.3 percent.

Of the 107 ballots accounted for thus far, Bonds has picked up new votes from 13 voters, while Clemens is at 14. Each has had one voter change their mind, taking them off their ballot.

This would seem to line up with the growing narrative that Selig, the commissioner of MLB during the time these players were allegedly cheating, can’t be inducted while the PED guys keep suffering.

Another player who may be put over the top by the new way of thinking is Ivan Rodriguez, who is in his first year of eligibility. The former catcher sits at 83.8 percent, joining Jeff Bagwell (92.8 percent), Tim Raines (91 percent) and first-time candidate Vlad Guerrero (75.7 percent) as those who would make it at this moment.

Edgar Martinez is also making a strong surge, picking up 19 new voters while losing just one, and currently sitting at 66.7 percent after getting just 43.4 percent last year.

Manny Ramirez, however, isn’t coming close to induction despite his Hall of Fame-like numbers. The first-year candidate is at 33.3 percent, with his suspensions due to PED being weighed heavy.

As for Curt Schilling, he has picked up seven new voters, but lost 16 (the most of any candidate thus far). He sits at 52.3 percent, which is identical to his number after last year’s voting.

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Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

It became very clear from the beginning of the offseason that the Red Sox weren’t going to go hard after Edwin Encarnacion. How early in the offseason? Try Nov. 5.

Edwin Encarnacion never came close to joining the Red Sox this offseason. (John E. Sokolowski/USA Today Sports)

Edwin Encarnacion never came close to joining the Red Sox this offseason. (John E. Sokolowski/USA Today Sports)

It became very clear from the beginning of the offseason that the Red Sox weren’t going to go hard after Edwin Encarnacion. How early in the offseason? Try Nov. 5.

It was on that day, at the Arizona Fall League All-Star Game, that Dave Dombrowski let Encarnacion’s agent, Paul Kinzer, the direction the Red Sox were going to go when it came to replacing David Ortiz. A few days later at the GM Meetings, the Sox’ strategy of not paying big bucks to help fill their vacant designated hitter spot.

What the Red Sox ultimately did was ink first baseman Mitch Moreland to a one-year, $5.5 million deal, with the plan to play the lefty hitter against righties with Hanley Ramirez serving as a DH. When lefties were starting, the likelihood would be that Ramirez could slide to first, with someone like Chris Young filling the DH role.

As for Encarnacion, he landed in Cleveland on a three-year deal worth $60 million, that includes a club option for a fourth season.

Considering the perceived natural fit for Encarnacion with the Red Sox (along with an endorsement from Ortiz), and the reasonable terms the 33-year-old agree to with the Indians, there were more than a few observers who viewed the first baseman/DH as one that got away.

So, what happened?

The prime impetus for the Red Sox not engaging in the Encarnacion sweepstakes was their desire to not be hit by the penalties that come with going over the luxury tax threshold, which is where they would find themselves even on the kind of three-year deal the slugger agreed to.

Here is a quick overview of the rules that were stiff-arming the Red Sox when it came to contemplating going over the CBT:

Ramifications of going over CBT

* The tax itself
* Team receives less compensation (lower draft choice) when they lose a free agent attached to a qualifying offer after that season.
* Team gives up a higher draft choice when they sign a free agent attached to a qualifying offer after that season.
* Team loses more international signing bonus pool money if sign a free agent attached to a qualifying offer.
* Higher tax rate/surcharge if team is more than $20 million over threshold; even more above $40 million over

Ramifications of going over multiple times in a row

* The more times you go over, the higher your tax rate is. Third time in a row = 50 percent for first $20 million over.
* The more times you go over, the more revenue sharing money you lose.

So while things would have gotten a little uncomfortable if the Red Sox didn’t reset their penalties and went over, doing so the following two years might have been the deal-breaker.

The Red Sox really don’t have much coming off the books after 2017, unless you include Moreland and Young ($6.5 million). If they don’t pick up Craig Kimbrel’s $13 million option for 2018 it could be more, but that wouldn’t seem to be a reality right now. The same goes for Chris Sale’s $12.5 million team option for 2018.

The price tags for arbitration-eligible players, such as Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts and Mookie Betts, figure to go a long way in negating any financial flexibility during this span, as well.

But for what Encarnacion delivers, a case could be made that it would be worth it to pay all of the aforementioned penalties. The Red Sox didn’t support that case. In fact, one has to wonder if Dombrowski viewed the value of the righty hitter like some others in baseball.

The Oakland A’s weren’t going to come close to going over the CBT, but there aren’t a lot of players Billy Beane is willing to go all-in for in free agency. He identified Encarnacion as one of those special opportunities, actually offering more than the Indians.

You have to also wonder if Encarnacion would have taken even less than he did with the Indians considering the Dominican Republic native prioritized signing with team closer to home instead of the biggest paycheck. And with the notion that he was going to value contentment, it shouldn’t be forgotten that the Red Sox were one of three teams on his pre-offseason list that he wanted to target signing with (the Blue Jays and another undisclosed team, not in New York, was the other).

So what if another player we knew the Red Sox lusted after would have made himself for a one-year deal in that $20 million-a-year range? Let’s just call that player … David Ortiz.

The guess is that if Ortiz changed his mind, and came out of his brief retirement for one more year, the Red Sox would be willing to bite the luxury tax bullet for season. But maybe not. Perhaps they wouldn’t view such a scenario in a very Belichickian viewpoint. By all accounts, after all, Red Sox ownership never did extend that nothing-to-lose offer to come back on a mammoth one-year deal.

But, once again, the penalty for turning their back on an Ortiz return almost certainly outweigh anything the new collective bargaining agreement can bring.

It’s all worth a holiday conversation.

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Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford