Eduardo Rodriguez (Jeff Curry/USA Today Sports)

Eduardo Rodriguez (Jeff Curry/USA Today Sports)

ST. LOUIS — It’s starting to look like the Red Sox might have something in Eduardo Rodriguez.

The Red Sox starter turned in yet another solid outing Tuesday night, allowing three runs over six innings. Rodriguez. It was the fifth straight start in which the lefty has gone six innings while not allowing more than three runs.

But in years past, this one had all the makings of one that would have come off the rails for the Red Sox.

After cruising through two innings, Rodriguez started slowing falling apart. After a leadoff single by Kolten Wong, the Red Sox pitcher actually hit St. Louis starting hurler Lance Lynn with two strikes while the pitcher was trying to bunt.

Two more hits and a sacrifice fly later and Rodriguez had given the lead right back to the Cardinals via a three-run inning. That’s when Chris Sale stepped in.

“I mean, I got out of that inning and Porz [Rick Porcello} and Sale come to me, and Sale just tells me, ‘Hey man.’ That was the key to get back in the game. He just tells me, ‘This is where the men go out and show who you are. Just go there and try to limit the damage and fight,’ you know what I mean? I think that helped me a lot to get back in the game.”

Rodriguez heeded the advice and righted the ship, going on to not allow another run throughout his final three innings. And by the time he exited, the Red Sox had reclaimed the lead to allow for what would be the starter’s second win of the season.

“I thought he turned in another quality performance here tonight and particularly the fifth and sixth inning where we will able to take back the lead with the two runs in the top of the fifth and he was at this best to go out and have a nine-pitch inning in the bottom of the fifth,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell after his team’s 6-3 win. “Kept his pitch count in order to be able to go out and really allow us to be able to set up the bullpen in a really, I think, a favorable way with some of the matchups.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Many of the Red Sox have been in slumps of late, but not Mookie Betts.

The right fielder took home American League Player of the Week honors last week when he batted .375 with three home runs, and he picked up where he left off Tuesday night in St. Louis when he led the Red Sox to a 6-3 win over the Cardinals.

Mookie Betts homered to leadoff Tuesday's game. (Jeff Curry/USA Today Sports)

Mookie Betts homered to leadoff Tuesday’s game. (Jeff Curry/USA Today Sports)

Many of the Red Sox have been in slumps of late, but not Mookie Betts.

The right fielder took home American League Player of the Week honors last week when he batted .375 with three home runs, and he picked up where he left off Tuesday night in St. Louis when he led the Red Sox to a 6-3 win over the Cardinals.

For a complete game recap, click here.

Betts wasted no time, as he blasted a leadoff home run to start the game. It was his 10th career leadoff home run, which ties the Red Sox’ all-time record (Jacoby Ellsbury).

The right fielder wasn’t done there, as he drove in the tying run at the time (3-3) in the fifth inning on a RBI ground out. The right fielder also made a tremendous play by throwing out Matt Carpenter at second base when he tried to extend a single into a double in the bottom half of the inning.

Carpenter ripped a liner down the line that kicked off the wall halfway out to the fence, Betts tracked it down and fired a strike to get him at second base to end the inning. If Carpenter got to second base he would have been the tying run.

Overall, Betts went 1-for-5 with two RBIs, but he had a much bigger impact on the game than the stat line indicates. With the bulk of the Red Sox lineup in a funk (finishing with only six hits in the game), Betts’ play of late could not have come at a better time.

Jackie Bradley Jr. is one of those players slumping, but he showed signs of coming out of it in the win.

The center fielder went 2-for-3 with a home run, a double and a walk. It’s worth noting both these hits were to the opposite field, a sign he’s much more locked in than he has been in recent weeks.

The Red Sox are only two games over .500 and that is primarily because of some of their top hitters underperforming. After a slow start to the season Betts has picked it up of late, and the Red Sox need some of their other key hitters to follow.

Shattering Perceptions Game Note Image

The Cardinals scored one of their runs on a sacrifice fly caught by Xander Bogaerts off the bat of Carpenter. Thanks to Baseball Reference Play Index, it was 134th sac fly fielded by a shortstop in the MLB since 1970 and Carpenter is the only batter with three of them (h/t @nuggetpalooza).

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

The third base position has been less than for the Red Sox so far this season, but their starting third baseman Pablo Sandoval is progressing towards a return.

Sandoval has been on the disabled list with a knee sprain since April 25, but he’s in St. Louis with the team and could begin a rehab assignment as early as Friday.

Pablo Sandoval could begin a rehab outing on Friday. (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Pablo Sandoval could begin a rehab outing on Friday. (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

The third base position has been less than for the Red Sox so far this season, but their starting third baseman Pablo Sandoval is progressing towards a return.

Sandoval has been on the disabled list with a knee sprain since April 25, but he’s in St. Louis with the team and could begin a rehab assignment as early as Friday.

“Went through some early work today, ran the bases, we’ve got to get him … now that he’s back to baseball activity, we’ve got to get him back into game shape and that’s going to be required to get out on rehab,” manager John Farrell told reporters in St. Louis. “We’re hopeful that will begin when we leave here and go to the West Coast. He’d join Pawtucket and start getting some games under his belt.”

Another player close to a return is David Price.

The left-hander will make his first rehab start with the PawSox Friday in Buffalo. If all goes well, he could slide into the Red Sox’ rotation as early as next week.

“I think we’ll reserve our planning until he gets through Friday but I wouldn’t rule it out at this point,” Farrell said.

Price would like take Hector Velazquez’s spot in the rotation, as he will start Thursday in Oakland.

It will be his major league debut, but he was very effective in Pawtucket. In five starts, he was 2-1 with a 1.55 ERA.

“He commands the baseball,” Farrell said. “That’s what it’s all about. It’s not about sheer velocity. It’s about pitching ahead in the count. I like the fact that late in camp he started to come up with a little more of an off-speed curveball to help spread the strike zone top to bottom. This is a guy who has a lot of experience, albeit not at the major league level, but still there’s a lot of savvy and strike throwing ability here.”

For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Two weeks ago, Curt Schilling said Adam Jones was lying about hearing the N-word in Boston.

Curt Schilling says Adam Jones is lying about hearing the N-word at Fenway Park.  (David Manning-USA TODAY Sports)

Curt Schilling says Adam Jones is lying about hearing the N-word at Fenway Park. (David Manning-USA TODAY Sports)

Two weeks ago, Curt Schilling said Adam Jones was lying about hearing the N-word in Boston. Now Adam Jones has responded.

In a lengthy Q&A with Yahoo’s Jeff Passan, Jones offered his longest comments to date on the events at Fenway Park May 2, when he says he was called the N-word a “handful” of times. After talking about the importance of sparking conversation, he turned his attention to the former Red Sox hurler.

“[Curt] Schilling is over there with his rants. He just wants an outlet,” Jones said. “Somebody will take his call, take his rants. He can keep them for himself. Because he’s never experienced anything like I have. I’ll stick with what [Mark] McLemore said about it: Schilling, hell of a career. But he’s never been black, and he’s never played the outfield in Boston.”

In a text message to WEEI.com, Schilling stood by his assertion. He said Jones, who frequently speaks out about racial issues, is interested in propagating a social genda.

“If he wants to maintain the lie he made here, that’s fine. No one denies racism exists, but when people like him lie about an incident and others just take him at his word, it perpetuates a mythical level of racism,” Schilling explained. “And for some reason, it appears blacks believe only blacks can talk about racism and only whites can be racists. I promise you if some scumbag yelled the N-word at Adam Jones in Fenway, it would have been on Twitter, Facebook and every other social media site asap, like every other ‘incident.’ Not to mention the liberal Boston media would have broken its neck to identify the racist. But just taking him at his word means there are a bunch of white cowards and racists living here, because no one stood up to the guy. Adam has an agenda and one needs to only look at his past commentary on race and racism to see it. But see, when you question fake hate crimes in this day and age it somehow makes you a racist. If you use this use every word or none at all.”

The Red Sox, for one, are taking Jones at his word. Team owner John Henry met with him after the reported incident, and president Sam Kennedy touted the club’s zero tolerance policy. In an effort to promote tolerance, Fenway Park ushers will wear “kind and “respectful” pins for the remainder of the season.

Jones told Passan he admires the Red Sox’s proactivity.

“For them to step up and intervene and show their appreciation for how I go out and mind my business and play the game and, knock on wood, try to be good for baseball, black, white or indifferent, they were really appreciative of that, and I was appreciative of them coming to me and getting ahead of it. Boston ain’t the only place it happens. We just have to make sure it doesn’t happen anywhere else.”

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer

Deven Marrero

Deven Marrero

ST. LOUIS — Since getting the chance to start at third base over the past two games, Deven Marrero has left a fairly positive impression. So much so that he’s getting another crack at it in the Red Sox’ series opener against the Cardinals Tuesday night.

Marrero won’t be hitting ninth this time, however, with Sox starter Eduardo Rodriguez having to hit without the designated hitter. That, of course, leaves Hanley Ramirez starting the game on the bench, with the Cardinals sending out right-hander Lance Lynn to the mound.

Here is the Red Sox’ starting lineup as they embark on a two-game set in St. Louis before heading for four games in Oakland:

Mookie Betts CF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
Andrew Benintendi LF
Mitch Moreland 1B
Christian Vazquez C
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Deven Marrero 3B
Eduardo Rodriguez P

For all the Red Sox news, go to the team page by click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

TO LISTEN TO EDDIE ROMERO OFFER INSIGHT TO RAFAEL DEVERS PATH TO THE MAJORS ON THE BRADFO SHO, CLICK HERE.

For those wanting Rafael Devers to come in and save the day at third base for the Red Sox, it sounds like you’re going to have to wait a while.

TO LISTEN TO EDDIE ROMERO OFFER INSIGHT TO RAFAEL DEVERS PATH TO THE MAJORS ON THE BRADFO SHO, CLICK HERE.

Rafael Devers

Rafael Devers

For those wanting Rafael Devers to come in and save the day at third base for the Red Sox, it sounds like you’re going to have to wait a while.

Appearing on the Bradfo Sho podcast, Red Sox assistant general manager Eddie Romero offered the reality when it comes to where Devers is in his progression toward becoming a major leaguer.

(18:40) “I don’t know what the plan is for him,” Romero said. “I know he is progressing very well. I think he is where he needs to be. As Dave mentioned last week, and we’ve said in our discussions over the past few days, he’s progressing well. He’s in a good spot. I think [Double-A Portland manager] Carlos Febles and the staff down there has done a great job developing. They know there’s another level to go to Triple-A and then the big league level, so he’s really only two notches away. Maturity. More at-bats. More games for him. And the fact that he’s still refining his approach which is a big thing. Our hitting coach, Lee May, is really emphasizing that with him. We’ve seen some results over the past month or so, or the past two weeks, that are encouraging in that regards where he’s refining his approach. That league knows who he is now, as well. He’s being pitched to difficulty and differently and now it’s his turn to make that adjustment and progress in that.”

Romero also explained that just because Andrew Benintendi made the jump from Double-A to the majors a year ago with some success, the organization isn’t looking at Devers’ situation in the same light.

(20:30) “I agree with that,” said Romero when it was suggested that Benintendi’s scenario was different than Devers because of age and experience. “Benny has played through high school and then he had his two years of college at a major school in probably the best conference of college baseball. Where Raffy comes from the riskiest and hardest to project and the market where he have the least experience before being thrown into professional baseball. We have to remember, he’s still 20 years old. He won’t be 21 until after the season. I know I keep saying it, but he’s in a good place developmentally. There are some things he needs to work on and he knows what those things are and that’s what he’s doing right now.”

So, what is Devers prioritizing?

(21:20) “I think it’s refining the approach,” Romero said. “I think that’s the biggest thing. He’s never been a guy to strikeout that much, but he also hasn’t walked that much. I think that’s one thing that more than walks or strikeouts, handling what pitchers are giving you and making sure you’re swinging at pitches you can do damage with. That’s something, especially at a young age, without that many minor league at-bats, he continues to work on. I think he knows the importance of that and that will only improve his numbers. That will allow to get to his power more. And I think that’s been the area of concentration for him. And I know chatting with him, he’s always working on his defense, as well. Whether it’s positioning, what he can get to with his range and coming in on balls and accuracy of his throws. That’s always on his mind, as well. It’s not always just about the bat.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford