Clay Buchholz

Clay Buchholz

The Red Sox will take a second shot at clinching the AL East when they send Clay Buchholz out against Yankees right-hander Bryan Mitchell on Wednesday night in the Bronx.

Buchholz is 8-10 with a 5.00 ERA and a 1.365 WHIP in 36 games (20 starts). On Wednesday, the 32-year-old right-hander went seven strong innings, giving up just one run, three hits and two walks with four strikeouts in a 5-1 win over the Orioles.

“I’ve been here before,” Buchholz said (via MLB.com). “I knew I wasn’t going to be bad all year. It was a stretch that I didn’t really know what was going on. I didn’t know how to fix it. I was trying too hard and overdoing a lot of things, overanalyzing. Yeah, it takes a couple of games to get some confidence going in the right direction. It’s fun pitching when everything is going good, especially when you’re winning.”

Against the Yankees, Buchholz is 6-9 with a 5.99 ERA and a 1.637 WHIP in 19 games (18 starts). In two games (one start) against New York this season, he is 1-0 with a 2.70 ERA and a 1.350 WHIP. His lone start vs. the Yankees came on Sept. 16, when he pitched six innings, allowing two runs, seven hits and two walks with two strikeouts in a 7-4 Sox win.

Brian Mitchell

Brian Mitchell

Mitchell is 1-2 with a 4.50 ERA and 1.722 WHIP in four starts. The 25-year-old was supposed to be on the Yankees’ Opening Day roster, but he injured his left big toe in his final spring training appearance and was placed on the DL. He came off the DL in August, rehabbed in the minors for a month, and rejoined the Yankees in early September. In his most recent start on Friday, Mitchell threw six innings, allowing three runs (one earned), six hits and four walks with two strikeouts in a 9-0 loss to Toronto.

“It’s not what you want, I mean, it’s frustrating,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said (via MLB.com). “I thought Mitch pitched a pretty good game and probably should have given up just one run over the six innings. I thought he settled down after the first two innings pretty well, but we just couldn’t get anything going.”

Mitchell has posted a 6.00 ERA and a 1.583 WHIP in five games (one start) against the Red Sox, but he has yet to record a decision. His only start against the Sox came on Sept. 17 when he pitched just 4 2/3 innings, giving up four runs (three earned runs), five hits and one walk with three strikeouts.

Red Sox vs. Mitchell (RHP)

Xander Bogaerts is 3-for-6 with 2 doubles, 1 home run and 3 RBIs.

Mookie Betts is 1-for-4.

Jackie Bradley Jr. is 2-for-3 with 1 RBI, 1 walk and 1 strikeout.

Dustin Pedroia is 0-for-3 with 1 walk.

Travis Shaw is 1-for-4 with 2 strikeouts.

Andrew Benintendi is 1-for-2 with 1 double.

Brock Holt is 0-for-1 with 1 walk.

Sandy Leon is 0-for-2.

Deven Marrero is 0-for-2.

David Ortiz is 0-for-2 with 1 RBI and 1 strikeout.

Hanley Ramirez is 1-for-2.

Ryan Hanigan is 0-for-1 with 1 strikeout.

Bryan Holaday is 0-for-1.

Christian Vazquez is 0-for-1 with 1 strikeout.

Yankees vs. Buchholz (RHP)

Mark Teixeira (26 plate appearances): .161 AVG./.222 OBP/.355 SLG, 2 home runs, 7 RBIs, 3 walks, 8 strikeouts

Brett Gardner (35): .250/.294/.313, 2 doubles, 4 RBIs, 2 walks, 7 strikeouts

Billy Butler (22): .222/.318/.222, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 2 strikeouts

Aaron Hicks (15): .154/.267/.231, 1 double, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 1 strikeout

Jacoby Ellsbury (14): .167/.286/.167, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 1 strikeout

Brian McCann (13): .364/.462/.545, 2 doubles, 1 RBI, 2 walks, 3 strikeouts

Chase Headley (11): .400/.455/.900, 2 doubles, 1 home run, 3 RBIs, 2 strikeouts

Starlin Castro is 1-for-7 with 2 strikeouts.

Did Gregorius is 3-for-7 with 1 double.

Gary Sanchez is 1-for-3 with 1 double and 2 RBIs.

Mason Williams is 2-for-2.

Austin Romine is 1-for-1.

Blog Author: 
John Hand

David Price took a step in the wrong direction Tuesday night.</p>
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NEW YORK — It’s been a while, but Tuesday night the second-guessing of John Farrell resurfaced.

With his team suffering it’s first loss since Sept. 14, dropping a 6-4 decision to the Yankees, Farrell was forced to explain what was a pivotal decision in what would be the end of an 11-game win streak.

John Farrell took out David Price only after the starter gave the lead back to the Yankees in the seventh inning Tuesday night. (Adam Hunger/USA Today Sports)

John Farrell took out David Price only after the starter gave the lead back to the Yankees in the seventh inning Tuesday night. (Adam Hunger/USA Today Sports)

NEW YORK — It’s been a while, but Tuesday night the second-guessing of John Farrell resurfaced.

With his team suffering it’s first loss since Sept. 14, dropping a 6-4 decision to the Yankees, Farrell was forced to explain what was a pivotal decision in what would be the end of an 11-game win streak.

The moment came heading into the home half of the seventh inning, with the Red Sox just having scored two in the top of the frame to tie things up at 4-4. Red Sox starting pitcher David Price was sitting at 76 pitches, having given up 10 hits, two of which were home runs.

With a rested bullpen, and Price’s pitch count at a manageable level, Farrell chose to ride out his starter despite the fact he clearly wasn’t as sharp as he had been in recent outings.

The result wasn’t good.

First came Austin Romine’s leadoff single to left field. That was followed by an opposite field home run to right field by rookie Tyler Austin, breaking the deadlock and ultimately proving the difference in the game. (To watch the homer, click here.)

“You go with a right-hander they’re going to go with [Mark] Teixeira and [Brian] McCann with that right field porch,” Farrell explained. “Wanted to keep the right-handers in the ballgame, mislocated over the plate.”

After another single, and finally the inning’s first out, Farrell lifted Price for reliever Brad Ziegler. The righty reliever came on and induced an inning-ending, 4-6-3 double play off the bat of Gary Sanchez.

The runs were just the second and third allowed by Price in the seventh inning this year, having pitched into the frame in 22 of his previous outings.

“I felt really good,” said Price of his condition heading into the seventh. “My pitch count was good and I felt good.”

The loss was Price’s first since Aug. 7, a stretch that included nine starts. During the run the lefty was 8-0 with a 2.86 ERA. Against the Yankees, however, he is now 1-3 with a 7.89 ERA in five starts.

“I feel good. I’m fine mentally. I’m fine physically,” Price said. “Didn’t do it tonight, but so what. I’ll get ‘em next time. That’s what I’ve said all year and I’ve done a much better job of that in the second half and I’m not going to be great every time out there.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

NEW YORK — The Red Sox will have to wait.

David Price couldn’t seal the deal Tuesday night, coming up with yet another supbar outing against the Yankees in suffering the loss in the Sox’ 6-4 defeat to New York Tuesday night at Yankee Stadium. With the Blue Jays win over the Orioles, it was a loss that kept John Farrell’s team’s magic number at one.

David Price suffered through another rough outing against the Yankees, Tuesday night. (Adam Hunger/USA Today Sports)

David Price suffered through another rough outing against the Yankees, Tuesday night. (Adam Hunger/USA Today Sports)

NEW YORK — The Red Sox will have to wait.

David Price couldn’t seal the deal Tuesday night, coming up with yet another supbar outing against the Yankees in suffering the loss in the Sox’ 6-4 defeat to New York Tuesday night at Yankee Stadium. With the Blue Jays win over the Orioles, it was a loss that kept John Farrell’s team’s magic number at one.

Besides putting the champagne showers on hold in the visitors clubhouse — and making the Red Sox’ ownership group hang around for at least another day — the loss also ended the Red Sox’ 11-game win streak

Punctuating the frustration for Price was Tyler Austin, a rookie first baseman who started 2016 in Double-A. Austin collected his third hit of the game on a two-run blast over the right field, breaking a 4-4 deadlock to give the hosts the lead for good.

The Red Sox did bring the potential go-ahead run to the plate with two outs in the ninth in the form of David Ortiz. But with Andrew Benintendi standing at second, Dustin Pedroia at first and Tyler Clippard pitching for New York, the Red Sox’ designated hitter capped his 0-for-5 night by striking out on a 3-2 fastball.

Price ended his start giving up six runs on 12 hits over 6 1/3 innings, striking just two while throwing 89 pitches. He gave up three home runs, making his total allowed for the season 29 after totaling just 17 against in 2015.

For the season, Price’s ERA against the Yankees was 7.89 (26 earned runs, 29 2/3 innings) over five starts. The lefty gave up at least five runs in every one of his meetings with New York.

The Red Sox had clawed all the way back with two runs in the seventh inning, starting with a leadoff homer by pinch-hitter Aaron Hill off former Sox Tommy Layne. That was followed by a Jackie Bradley Jr. single and Sandy Leon sacrifice bunt.

After Benintendi made the inning’s second out, Pedroia placed an opposite field ground ball down the first base line (a direction he typically never hits the ball) and into the right field corner for the game-tying, RBI single.

It appeared as though the trend of late was going to continue, with the Red Sox have trailed after five innings in five of their wins during the recent 11-game streak. But for the first time since suffering a 1-0 loss to the Orioles on Sept. 14, there would be no comeback.

The Red Sox found themselves in their hole due to Price’s troubles, which included giving up two runs in the first, one in the fifth and another in the sixth on Didi Gregorius’ solo homer.

For a complete box score, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

NEW YORK — It would have been a nice story.

The idea that David Ortiz might play baseball one more time after retiring this season, as a member of the Dominican Republic’s World Baseball Classic team, had been muttered before. But when meeting with the media prior to the Red Sox’ game against the Yankees Tuesday night, Ortiz put that notion to rest.

David Ortiz

David Ortiz

NEW YORK — It would have been a nice story.

The idea that David Ortiz might play baseball one more time after retiring this season, as a member of the Dominican Republic’s World Baseball Classic team, had been muttered before. But when meeting with the media prior to the Red Sox’ game against the Yankees Tuesday night, Ortiz put that notion to rest.

“I’d probably need 15 months to recover,” he said. “I would love to represent my country, but like I say, I’m in a situation where I’m trying every day to get ready to play a game. My body is so happy. My body is counting the days. It’s hard to play baseball when you’re 40. It’s something that, especially when you’re looking around and everybody is 20. You can be a dad. When you look around baseball, everyone is 20. Everything is moving pretty fast.

“The thing that people don’t understand is that baseball, if you want to be successful and you want to be able to do what we did in the last one, you’ve got to be playing. You can’t just come out of the box and be like, ‘Hey, I’m here. Can I play just because I’m a big name?’ It doesn’t work that way. I have been part of Baseball Classics before and it hasn’t been that well. When we had guys who were playing winter ball and ready to go, that’s all about timing and being ready to go. Big names, we train and then we play. When you don’t train and you’re not seeing pitches and then you go play, the results are not the ones that you expect. We have a lot of good players, good young players. I know they’re going to do really well. If I can do anything on the other side for the Dominican ball club, by that time if I’m able to I’ll probably do something, but I don’t think I’m going to be able to play.”

Ortiz played in the WBC, which will be held once again next March, in 2006 and 2009, skipping 2013 due to his heel/foot injury.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

NEW YORK — This wasn’t exactly how the Red Sox envisioned Drew Pomeranz’ status at this point in a pennant race.

John Farrell announced prior to Tuesday night’s game against the Yankees that Pomeranz would not be making his scheduled start Thursday due to both a sore left forearm, and having totaled more innings that any point in his career (169 1/3 innings).

Drew Pomeranz

Drew Pomeranz

NEW YORK — This wasn’t exactly how the Red Sox envisioned Drew Pomeranz’ status at this point in a pennant race.

John Farrell announced prior to Tuesday night’s game against the Yankees that Pomeranz would not be making his scheduled start Thursday due to both a sore left forearm, and having totaled more innings that any point in his career (169 1/3 innings).

Because of the combination of the two, if Pomeranz pitches again this season it will be as a reliever. Henry Owens will be making the Thursday start for the Red Sox.

“He’s come out of his last start a little more sore,” Farrell said. “There’s been additional need for recovery time. The total number of innings pitched. There’s been a combination of factors. He is not shut down, but he is not starting Thursday. We need to get him on a mound hopefully by the end of the week to determine a bullpen role going forward.”

Pomeranz has struggled in his last three starts, totaling an 8.44 ERA over just 10 2/3 innings. Since joining the Red Sox in a July trade which sent top pitching prospect Anderson Espinoza to San Diego, the lefty has gone 3-5 with a 4.68 ERA.

“You always put the player’s health at the forefront,” Farrell said. “Is there an increased risk at a higher number of innings, the innings he’s totaling with the need for added recovery time? You factor those in. This is independent of the standings.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford