According to multiple reports, Larry Lucchino will be leaving his post as Red Sox president/CEO as early as the end of October.

According to multiple reports, Larry Lucchino will be leaving his post as Red Sox president/CEO as early as the end of October.

Lucchino will reportedly be replaced by current Red Sox chief operating officer Sam Kennedy. The 42-year-old Kennedy, a Brookline native, is not believed to have a role in player acquisition in the manner Lucchino did since joining the club in 2002.

According to the Boston Herald, the transition from Lucchino to Kennedy has already begun.

“The truth is Sam is an important part of this puzzle,” Lucchino told the Boston Herald. “He’s been working for me for 20 years, right out of college. He’s certainly my choice, as well as that of John [Henry] and Tom [Werner], to be promoted the position of president.”

It has long been rumored that Lucchino would be stepping aside from his current post, with the longtime baseball executive — who will turn 70 next month — seemingly wanting to diminish his workload. The current president/CEO hasn’t been as visible this season, with much of his focus turned to the the purchase of the Pawtucket Red Sox and that organization’s quest to build a new stadium in Providence.

Another motivation for the Red Sox is to keep Kennedy in the fold, with the former classmate of Theo Epstein at Brookline High having recently been courted by Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment, which owns both the NBA’s Toronto Raptors and Toronto Maple Leafs of the NHL.

“We are hopeful and confident that we will conclude an agreement with Larry going forward where he will continue to be an integral part of upper management,” Red Sox chairman Tom Werner told the Boston Herald. “He will have less of an everyday role but he will continue to have an important strategic role not just with the Red Sox but also within Major League Baseball.”

Kennedy came back to Boston in 2002 after working under Lucchino in San Diego as the executive director of partnerships and broadcasting.

While there was some rumbling in spring training about a power struggle between Lucchino and owner Mike Gordon, the reality was that both Gordon — president of the Fenway Sports Group — and Werner already resided above Lucchino in the decision making hierarchy due to their ownership stakes.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Travis Shaw went 4-for-4 with his first two major league homers in the Red Sox' win Saturday. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Travis Shaw went 4-for-4 with his first two major league homers in the Red Sox‘ win Saturday. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Listening to Travis Shaw after Saturday’s game you’d never know went 4-for-4, hitting the first two home runs of his major league career and falling a triple short of the cycle, while scoring five runs in the Red Sox’ 11-7 win over the Rays.

The 25-year-old barely cracked a smile during the roughly five minutes he spoke to the media after the game, but maybe there’s a reason for that.

Shaw’s dad Jeff was a major league reliever who played 12 seasons in the majors and was a two-time All-Star. Growing up, Travis was always at the park shagging fly balls during batting practice and even serving as bat boy during road games. He probably had seen many performances better than his own.

“Son of a major leaguer, maybe that’s why he keeps it in stride. He’s been around it his entire life,” manager John Farrell said, who actually played with Jeff on the Indians, Jeff’s first three years in the majors.

“Jeff never shut up, Travis is quiet. They both have the last name Shaw, but very different,” he added.

Shaw stepped to the plate a triple shy of the cycle in the eighth inning, but instead of the cycle he crushed a homer to dead-center field for his second of the day. He became the first Red Sox player since at least 1914 to record four hits, five runs and 11 total bases in a game.

He admitted he was thinking about the cycle stepping to the plate.

“It’s in your head,” he said. “Everyone is talking about it. If you hit the ball in the gap, everyone is like, ‘Don’t stop running.’ I’ll take the homer.”

His first home run came in the third inning when he took Rays starter Matt Moore deep into the Rays bullpen for his first career home run.

The left-handed hitter who stands 6-foot-4 said he felt some sense of relief as he had played in eight games before recording his first major league hit in his ninth game (back in early July before being sent down) and then in his 10th he was able to hit his first home run.

“It’s about the same,” he said of more weight being off his shoulders after his first homer. “Everyone is looking at me to hit home runs, especially with the type of body that I have. Being able to go out there and do that it takes some weight off your shoulders.”

In 77 games with Pawtucket this season he has hit .249 with five home runs and 30 RBIs, but has swung a better bat of late as he had three multi-hit games in his last eight games before the promotion. He used that success to help him with his confidence.

“I feel pretty good at the plate,” Shaw said. “Just trying to not do too much, just stick with what I’ve done down there. I’ve been successful down there and trying to carry that up here.”

Shaw was called up early Saturday as the team needed more infield depth, but with the organization now thinking more towards 2016, he could be here to stay. He was drafted in 2011 by the Red Sox as a first baseman, but immediately added third base to his repertoire.

It’s possible if the Red Sox were to deal Mike Napoli during August, they could give Shaw more playing time at first base to see what he has, as the team weighs its options for the position next season.

No matter how many more games he does get to play in, Shaw just wants to make the most of them.

“It’s sort of out of my control,” he said. “I try and control what I can control. Each day that I am in the lineup up here try and make the most of and hopefully that speaks for its self.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Joe & Dave talked to the Sox rookie, who had four hits, hit two home runs, and scored five runs in the win over the Rays at Fenway.

[0:00:00] ... Travis Roy yet they give it lasted that day you at the home run we think it triple for the cycle the the a little bit I mean it's obviously your head and that's only thing left guys Italian they've been in the gap just don't stop running. I'll definitely the home run yeah multi homer game for us. And yet you headed to Goodell is a problem throughout purely crush the ball onto us. Senator field did you have an inkling that this was going to be that kind of a day for you given your first at bat. Not really I mean you just try to go up there every single bad stay with your. Stay with your approach not to do too much and luckily I was able to get some pitches that I could handle. And was able try to work with some good swings on it was able to help you know. About the way use the whole field double overlap home profit over the visiting bullpen or write your home run to dead center. Yeah I mean that's that's that's my game I just try to stay through the middle of the field. ...
[0:01:28] ... get your first basically getting your dad's birthday Jeff shot a former Major League reliever. Country was watching as well aware what's happened that day yeah I mean he's probably gonna be one of the first people I talked to after the game so. I'm sure used to dental clinic in Ohio yep yep back. And Ohio we'll let you go and enjoy that and I continued success to you Travis thanks so much thank you appreciate it. ...




Joe & Dave talked to the Sox rookie, who had four hits, hit two home runs, and scored five runs in the win over the Rays at Fenway

[0:00:09] ... Italian Neifi in the gap just don't stop running. I'll definitely the home run yeah multi homer game for us. And yet you headed to Goodell is a problem throughout purely crushed that ball onto us. Center field did you have an inkling that this was going to be that kind of a day for you given your first at bat. Not really I mean you just try to go out there every single bad stage here. There with your approach not to do too much and luckily I was able to get some pitches I could handle. And was able try to work with some good swings on it was able to help you know. About the way use the whole field double overlap home profit over the visiting bullpen are right at home run to dead center. Yeah I mean that's that's that's my game I just try to stay through the mill field. Don't get ...
[0:01:28] ... get your first basically getting your dad's birthday Jeff shot a former Major League reliever at. Country was watching as well aware what's happened that day yeah I mean he's probably going to be one of the first people I talked to after the game so. I'm sure he used to dental clinic in Ohio yep yep back. And Ohio we'll let you go and enjoy that and I continued success to you Travis thanks so much thank you appreciate it. ...




After a sluggish start offensively following the All-Star break, the Red Sox offense has turned a corner.

Travis Shaw recorded his first major league extra-base hit and first major league home run in the Red Sox' win over the Rays. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Travis Shaw recorded his first major league extra-base hit and first major league home run in the Red Sox‘ win over the Rays. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

After a sluggish start offensively following the All-Star break, the Red Sox offense has turned a corner.

Coming out of the break the Red Sox averaged 1.77 over the first nine games, but since they have scored at least seven runs in five of their last seven games, including Saturday’s 11-7 win over the Rays.

It was the Red Sox’ third straight win, their first three-game winning streak since their four-game win streak that ended July 8.

The Red Sox scored early and often against Rays left-hander Matt Moore. They scored a run in the first and exploded for four in the second before adding another in the third to make it a 6-0 game after three innings.

Travis Shaw, who was called up Saturday morning, paced the offense going 4-for-4 with a walk with two home runs, a double and three RBIs — finishing a triple shy of the cycle. He recorded his first career extra-base hit and then he followed with his first career homer. He also scored five runs, which is the most by a Red Sox player since August 12, 2008.

It was his third professional two-homer game, as he had two in the minors.

Boston’s offensive took advantage of going against Moore, who entered with a 7.61 ERA. Moore lasted just three innings and allowed six runs on nine hits.

Although the Sox jumped out to a 6-0 lead, the win didn’t come easy.

Red Sox starter Joe Kelly got off to an excellent start, as after allowing a single to John Jaso to open the game, he retired the next nine batters until falling apart over the next three innings.

In the fourth, Kelly allowed the first four batters to reach, but did settle down to limit the damage to only two runs. Then in the fifth, after allowing four straight batters to reach and two more runs, he retired the final two with runners on first and third to escape. He allowed another run in the sixth, which ultimately ended his day.

Kelly finished the game going five-plus innings, allowing five runs on nine hits. Justin Masterson came on in relief and allowed an inherited runner to score and a run of his own to make it a 7-6 game at the time.

The Sox added some insurance runs in the sixth as Rusney Castillo drove in two with an RBI single to right and then two more in the eighth on Shaw’s second homer of the day.

Here is what went right (and wrong) in the Red Sox’ win:

WHAT WENT RIGHT

— Xander Bogaerts went 4-for-5. It’s his fifth four-hit game this season, which is the most in all of baseball.

— Ryan Hanigan’s single in the second inning extended his hit streak to six games, which is a season-high. He has now reached base in 17 of 18 home games this season.

— Brock Holt extended his hit streak to five games with his single in the first inning. Over that span he’s batting .400.

— Castillo went 3-for-4 with a sacrifice bunt and four RBIs. It was his third career three-hit game.

WHAT WENT WRONG

— Kelly has yet to prove he can be a consistent starter in the major leagues. He hasn’t gone longer than 5 1/3 innings in any of his last five starts and it seems more and more his stuff was play better as a reliever (shorter stints), as evident by the start he got off to in the game. It’s the eighth time in 17 starts he’s allowed at least five runs.

Mike Napoli went 0-for-5 with two strikeouts after his game-winning homer Friday night.

— Jean Machi, making his Red Sox debut, allowed a solo homer to Logan Forsythe in the ninth.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

A look at the action in the Red Sox farm system on Friday:

A look at the action in the Red Sox farm system on Friday:

Marco Hernandez

Marco Hernandez

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (42-64): L, 2-1 in 13 innings, at Buffalo (Blue Jays)

— The Pawtucket offense continued to struggle, scoring just one run on five hits over 13 innings as the PawSox lost on a walkoff double to finish July with a record of 4-22. Second baseman Marco Hernandez (Boston’€™s No. 23 prospect at MLB.com) drove in the lone Pawtucket run in the fourth as he scored DH Garin Cecchini (Boston’€™s No. 14 prospect at MLB.com) who had walked with two outs.

First baseman Allen Craig was the only batter with multiple hits for the PawSox, finishing 2-for-6 with three strikeouts.

— RHP Jess Todd, RHP Matt Barnes, and RHP Ronald Belisario combined to pitch 11 innings with just one unearned run crossing the plate, after back-to-back errors from Hernandez in the fifth.

With a runner at first, a slow chopper to second caused confusion as shortstop Deven Marrero cut in front of a charging Hernandez who then couldn’€™t come up with the ball. The next batter hit a broken-bat grounder to short that could have been a double-play, but Hernandez threw high and wide to first allowing a run to score.

Todd finished with a no-decision line of: 6 IP, 6 H, 1 R, 0 ER, 1 BB, 3 SO. Barnes pitched three scoreless, allowing just two hits with a strikeout and Belisario pitched two scoreless with just one hit allowed.

— RHP Noe Ramirez suffered the loss in extra innings (4-1, 2.20 ERA), as after retiring the first five batters he faced he allowed a two-out single and then game-winning double into the corner in left field. The double snuck between the third-base bag and third baseman Mike Miller, who was playing close to the line, and the relay form left fielder Jeff Bianchi to Marrero to catcher Humberto Quintero was not in time.

Henry Ramos

Henry Ramos

DOUBLE-A PORTLAND SEA DOGS (40-67): L, 9-4, vs. Harrisburg (Nationals)

— Right fielder Henry Ramos (Boston’€™s No. 27 prospect at MLB.com) went 3-for-3 with a double, an RBI single, a walk, and two runs scored to lead Portland’€™s offense. Shortstop Tzu-Wei Lin was the only other Sea Dogs’ batter with multiple hits, as Lin finished 2-for-4 with an RBI-single. Portland stranded nine runners on base, finishing 3-for-15 with runners in scoring position on the 10-hit night.

Ramos is hitting .233 in 23 games with Portland this season as he returns from offseason knee surgery. The 23-year-old Puerto Rico native, selected by Boston in the fifth round of the 2010 draft, hit .326 in 2014 over 48 games in Double-A after hitting 12 home runs in 2013 with High-A Salem. Ramos has hits in eight of his last 10 games and is hitting .361 (13-for-36) over that span with four doubles and five runs scored.

— Center fielder Manuel Margot (Boston’€™s No. 3 prospect at MLB.com) and first baseman Sam Travis (Boston’€™s No. 12 prospect at MLB.com) each doubled, with Travis extending his hitting streak to eight games. Travis, 21, is slashing .308/.370/.415 over his first 34 games with Portland. The 20-year-old Margot, who also walked, is at .252/.305/.378 through his first 35 games in Double-A.

— RHP Justin Haley took the loss (4-12, 5.32 ERA) despite a quality start, with a final line of: 6 IP, 7 H, 4 R, 3 ER, 1 BB (93 pitches, 65 strikes). Fielding errors by third baseman Oscar Tejeda and left fielder Aneury Tavarez led to an unearned run in the first, and then Haley allowed a solo homer and a two-RBI double in the third as Potomac took a 4-1 lead. Haley, 24, recovered to retire eight of the final nine batters he faced. Selected by Boston in the sixth round of the 2012 draft out of Fresno State University, Haley has struck out 72 in 91 1/3 innings this year while allowing 40 walks.

Kevin McAvoy

Kevin McAvoy

HIGH-A SALEM RED SOX (52-54): W, 5-1, at Potomac (Nationals)

— RHP Kevin McAvoy pitched a career-high seven innings, allowing just one unearned run on five hits with three walks and two strikeouts, earning the victory to improve to 6-9 with a 4.12 ERA through 20 starts. The 22-year-old McAvoy had his sinker working to produce 12 ground ball outs, including three double plays to give him a Carolina League-leading 23 on the year. The 6-foot-4 McAvoy was selected by Boston in the fourth-round of the 2014 draft out of Bryant University and has now produced back-to-back quality starts after allowing eight runs in 3 2/3 innings on July 21.

— Catcher Jordan Procyshen, playing in his first game since July 23, went the opposite way to double home two runs in the second and brought in another run in the fourth on a ground out to finish with three RBIs on a 1-for-3 night. The 22-year-old had an All-Star first half with Greenville, hitting .285, but has hit just .213 through 17 games since his promotion to Salem on June 26. A Canadian native and lefty bat, Procyshen was selected by Boston in the 14th round of the 2014 draft out of Northern Kentucky University.

— Right fielder Kevin Heller homered to leadoff the second inning and finished 2-for-4 with a walk to raise his slash line to .315/.437/.460 in 61 games with Salem this year. It was Heller’€™s fifth home run this season and capped off a sensational month of July where Heller hit .354 with a .510 on-base percentage and 17 RBIs, reaching base safely in 23 of 26 games during the month. The 25-year-old Heller was selected by Boston in the 40th round of the 2012 draft out of Amherst College.

— Second baseman Wendell Rijo (Boston’€™s No. 15 prospect at MLB.com), DH Cole Sturgeon, third baseman Jordan Betts, and first baseman Mario Martinez all had multi-hit games for Salem as they compiled 13 total hits. Betts had a double while Martinez finished 3-for-4 with two doubles and three runs scored.

Bryan Hudson

Bryan Hudson

SINGLE-A GREENVILLE DRIVE (53-51): W, 4-2, vs. Lexington (Royals)

— Center fielder Bryan Hudson made a terrific diving catch to end the game in the top of the ninth on a ball headed for the deepest part of the ballpark at Fluor Field, to the notch just right of center. With two outs and runners on first and third, RHP Kuehl McEachern allowed the shot ticketed for extra bases and potentially the tying run only to see Hudson fully extend and haul it in for the game-winning catch.

The 20-year-old Hudson also walked twice, stole a base, and scored a run, and is slashing .304/.360/.343 with Greenville through his first 26 games since his promotion from Lowell on June 26. Selected by Boston in the 15th round of the 2013 draft out of high school in Georgia, 27 of Hudson’€™s 31 hits have gone for singles with four doubles and seven stolen bases in eight attempts.

— Right fielder Joseph Monge gave Greenville a 2-0 lead in the third on a two-RBI double off the center field wall, and the Drive picked up sixth inning RBIs from catcher J.T. Watkins and left fielder Mike Meyers. Shortstop Javier Guerra (Boston’€™s No. 7 prospect at MLB.com) went 2-for-4 with a double and a run scored, and DH Rafael Devers (Boston’€™s No. 2 prospect at MLB.com) went 1-for-4 with a double. Second baseman Yoan Moncada (Boston’€™s No. 1 prospect at MLB.com) was 0-for-3 with a walk, in addition to being a part of three double plays in the field.

— LHP Dedgar Jimenez used those double plays and another to give him four in all to his advantage and picked up the victory (6-7, 3.93 ERA) with a final line of: 6 2/3 IP, 7 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 3 BB, 3 SO (92 pitches, 61 strikes). Jimenez, 19, allowed two solo home runs but pitched his deepest into a game this season for his first win and first quality start since June 20. All told this season, the 6-foot-3 Jimenez has made 16 starts, striking out 53 with 16 walks over 87 innings.

Victor Acosta

Victor Acosta

SHORT-SEASON SINGLE-A LOWELL SPINNERS (21-19): W, 9-3, at State College (Cardinals)

— Third baseman Victor Acosta broke a 3-3 tie in the eighth inning with a two-RBI double that scored shortstop Jeremy Rivera and second baseman Chad De La Guerra and Lowell went on to break the game open with a six-run inning. Acosta would come around to score in the inning on an RBI triple from DH Kyri Washington, who then scored along with first baseman Tucker Tubbs on catcher Austin Rei’€™s (Boston’€™s No. 18 prospect at MLB.com) two-RBI two-bagger.

Lowell pounded out 12 hits in the game, including four for extra bases, with Acosta, Rivera, center fielder Luis Alexander Basabe (Boston’€™s No. 30 prospect at MLB.com), and left fielder Brandon Magee having multi-hit games.

— Magee, 24, finished 3-for-4 with his first professional triple and double to go with an RBI and run scored. Magee is playing his first year of professional baseball after being drafted by Boston in the 23rd round of the 2012 draft out of Arizona State University, but deciding initially on a football career. Magee spent time as a linebacker with the Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers before re-joining the Red Sox organization this year. Through 16 games Magee is 8-for-38 (.211) with four RBIs and six runs scored.

— RHP Jose Almonte pitched a no-decision line of: 5 1/3 IP, 1 H, 3 R, 3 ER, 4 BB, 6 SO (79 pitches, 46 strikes). Almonte, 19, struck out the side around a walk in the first, and had faced just one over the minimum through three innings before allowing a run in the fourth. The 6-foot-2 Almonte was removed after two walks in the sixth. Signed by Boston for $610,000 during the 2012 international signing period out of the Dominican Republic, Almonte is now 2-2 with a 4.58 ERA this season through eight starts, with 31 strikeouts and 23 walks in 35 1/3 innings. Opposing batters are hitting just .140 against him.

— LHP Matt Kent closed the game out and picked up the victory (3-0, 1.98 ERA) with 3 2/3 scoreless innings of work, allowing three hits and a walk while striking out three. Kent allowed a single in the sixth to score a run, charged to Almonte, but struck out two in the frame and stranded runners in the seventh and eighth as well. Selected by Boston in the 13th round of this year’€™s draft out of Texas A&M University, the 22-year-old Kent has allowed just four earned runs in his first 26 innings as a professional with 21 strikeouts and six walks.

Gerson Bautista

Gerson Bautista

ROOKIE GULF COAST LEAGUE RED SOX (21-11): L, 10-2, vs. GCL Twins and W, 1-0, at GCL Twins

— In Game 1 of a doubleheader, the make up of a July 24 postponed game, the GCL Red Sox lost 10-2 in seven innings.

RHP Kevin Kelleher, Boston’€™s 12th-round selection in this year’€™s draft out of the University of New Orleans, started in his professional debut but only recorded one out as he walked four consecutive batters and was replaced after facing just five hitters. The 6-foot-3, 22-year-old Kelleher racked up 71 strikeouts in 54 1/3 innings this year in college, finishing with seven starts and 25 total appearances and a 3.98 ERA.

The GCL Red Sox offense managed just five hits in Game 1, all singles, with DH Raiwinson Lameda picking up the team’€™s lone RBI on a groundout in the first to score leadoff batter Andy Perez, who had reached on an error.

— In Game 2 of the double-dip, the GCL Red Sox won a 1-0 seven inning affair thanks to a combined one-hit shutout from RHP Gerson Bautista and RHP Nick Duron.

Bautista, a 6-foot-2 Dominican native pitched four hitless innings with four walks and three strikeouts. Two of his four walks came in the fourth inning, but the 20-year-old Bautista struck out the final two batters of the frame to escape the jam. After two more walks to leadoff the fifth, Bautista was removed. Bautista is 1-2 with a 3.26 ERA through seven starts this year, with 20 strikeouts and 17 walks in 20 1/3 innings and an opposing batting average of just .204.

Duron, a 6-foot-4 California native selected by Boston in the 31st round of this year’€™s draft out of Clark Community College, allowed just one hit over three innings while striking out four and hitting one batter. The 19-year-old Duron has now made eight relief appearances in the Gulf Coast League and has a 1.50 ERA with just two earned runs allowed in his first 12 innings as a professional, with 16 strikeouts to two walks.

— The lone GCL Red Sox run in Game 2 came after a leadoff double from right fielder Tyler Hill and ensuing RBI single from catcher Isaias Lucena. Selected by Boston in the 19th round in the 2014 draft, Hill is slashing .233/.356/.260 through 22 games this season.

— Sean Coyle (Boston’€™s No. 17 prospect at MLB.com) began a rehab assignment and went 0-for-2 with two strikeouts and a walk batting from the third spot in the batting order as the DH. The 23-year-old second baseman hit .295 over 96 games with Double-A Portland in 2014, hitting 16 home runs, but struggled in the first half with Triple-A Pawtucket this season hitting just .159 with five homers over 39 games before being placed on the disabled list in late June. Coyle, a third-round selection by Boston in the 2009 draft, also spent time on the DL from May 15 through June 7 of this year with left elbow inflammation.

Blog Author: 
Ken Laird

With the uncertain status of third baseman Pablo Sandoval, the Red Sox were forced to make a move to get some infield depth.

The team recalled first/third baseman Travis Shaw from Triple-A Pawtucket and optioned reliever Jonathan Aro back to Triple-A.