As an elder statesman on the Red Sox, Dustin Pedroia says he now trains differently than he did as a young player. And he takes some of his cues from Tom Brady, the Benjamin Button of quarterbacks.

Dustin Pedroia posted his best OPS last season since 2011.  (Kim Klement/USA TODAY Sports)

Dustin Pedroia posted his best OPS last season since 2011. (Kim Klement/USA TODAY Sports)

As an elder statesman on the Red Sox, Dustin Pedroia says he now trains differently than he did as a young player. And he takes some of his cues from Tom Brady, the Benjamin Button of quarterbacks.

In an interview on WEEI.com’s Bradfo Sho, Pedroia extolled Brady’s approach to playing football. He also cited ways in which he’s carried over some of TB12’s techniques to his own training regimen.

“I understand what he does and know what he does. I think it’s awesome,” Pedroia said. “There’s a reason why he’s successful at his age, and he looks better now than he did when he first came to the league. You have to be smarter as you get older and learn different styles –– the way to train and the way you take care of your body to be able to perform and stay on the field. It doesn’t matter what sport you’re playing. He’s definitely got that figured out.”

Instead of weight training, Brady focuses on muscle pliability. In a New York Times profile, he attributes his remarkable ability to stay on the field to his muscle’s elasticity. Brady hasn’t missed a single game due to injury since he tore his ACL in 2007.

After missing time at the end of the 2014 and 2015 campaigns, Pedroia played in 154 games last season. He posted his highest OPS since 2011, stopping a five-year decline. At 33 years old, Pedroia says he recognizes the pitfalls of intensive weight training, and the advantages that can be gained from living a healthy lifestyle.

“There’s tons of ways to take care of your body. It’s not just get in the weight room and throw weights around,” he said. “As you get older, the human body can’t take the pounding if you’re going in there and power lifting. When you’re younger, you can handle some of that. But as you get older, you got to be smarter. Sometimes less is more –– whether that’s weight or reps or whatever. You’ve just got to be smart. And eating wise, that’s a big part of recovery. If you put the right foods in your body, you’ll heal faster if you’re injured or recover faster. It’s like a car, man. Put bad gas in, bro. It’s not going to be the same as good gas.”

Pedroia didn’t reveal how much longer he wants to keep playing baseball, but did say he intends to honor the five years remaining on his Red Sox contract. Whether he keeps playing or not, it’s apparent Pedroia will continue to be cognizant of his body long after he hangs up the spikes. He wants to live until he’s in the triple-digits.

“I plan on living until I’m 100. So, we’re not even halfway home,” he said.

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Let the World Baseball Classic discomfort begin.

So, it turns out Hanley Ramirez hasn’t played first base yet because there is a bit of discomfort in his right throwing shoulder when tossing the baseball.

Hanley Ramirez (WEEI.com photo)

Hanley Ramirez (WEEI.com photo)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Let the World Baseball Classic discomfort begin.

So, it turns out Hanley Ramirez hasn’t played first base yet because there is a bit of discomfort in his right throwing shoulder when tossing the baseball.

“Well, we’re working through ramping up his throwing program,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell Monday morning. “That has taken a little bit more time than anticipated coming in so we’ve got to kind of take that day to day how much we can increase the intensity with the throwing. He’s just working through some soreness with the throwing.”

Normally, that wouldn’t be a big deal. The Red Sox went through a similar program with Ramirez this time last year, not letting the first baseman throw extensively throughout the first few weeks of camp.

But this time is different. This time Ramirez will be in the hands of Team Dominican Republic starting Friday thanks to the World Baseball Classic. And while Moises Alou’s club will be communicating on a daily basis with the Red Sox training staff, the idea that Ramirez might actually be jumping into game situations for nine innings at a whack at this point should seem uncomfortable.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do. They haven’t told me anything,” Ramirez told WEEI.com when asked if he planning on playing first base in the WBC. “I’m just going to go there and see”

Farrell said the concern and timetable aren’t currently at the point where the Red Sox would have to step in to mandate Ramirez doesn’t play in the field.

While Ramirez’s first base glove is certainly at the ready, already donning the flag of the Dominican Republic, Team DR does have another option at the position, with Cleveland’s Carlos Santana on the roster.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

We've got your photo recap of today's simulated game with @RickPorcello (AKA the 2016 AL Cy Young).Blog: https://t.co/nPawZTNHMs pic.twitter.com/gmtnF37Zeo

FORT MYERS, Fla. — On the field in an empty JetBlue Park the reigning American League Cy Young Award winner got his work in.

Under a blazing sun, Rick Porcello faced nine batters, throwing 37 pitches to both Xander Bogaerts and Sandy Leon in a simulated game. It went well enough, with the righty giving up two hits while notching three strikeouts and issuing a free pass.

It was a good first step, but that’s all. And Porcello knew reality of the moment.

That’s why, when talking after the exercise, the idea of joining those pitchers participating in the upcoming World Baseball Classic seemed so foreign.

“I mean, I wouldn’t be ready to compete in a game in the WBC,” Porcello said. “I feel really good right now, but that’s just a different type of pitching. Our responsibilities, at least me, my responsibility is with the Red Sox and being sure that I’m ready to go here. I think that that at least in my head would take away from some of the preparation I want to go through.

“If I want to work slow and focus on my fastball command for an extended period of time, you’re not necessarily going to be able to do that when you’re competing in a game and I’ve got Miguel Cabrera at the plate with second and third and one out. I’m not going to just serve up some fastballs to him. There are definitely some guys that are capable of doing it. Right now, at this stage for me, I couldn’t really fathom pitching in a competitive game like that. Not that I’m going through the motions in spring training games, but it’s different.”

Porcello, who is on track to pitch Opening Day after a scheduled six exhibition starts, is intent on taking advantage of the WBC-induced spring training slate, even though he won’t participate in the tournament.

“Yeah, that’s a benefit to us, I think,” he said. “The more time you have, you can work a little bit slower and take some more time to focus on some little details that maybe if you’re rushing through your preparation for the season you might not have an opportunity to pay attention to as much. You just look at it as an opportunity to get some more work in and continue to refine things.”

To read more about the dangers of the World Baseball Classic for pitchers, read John Tomase’s column by clicking here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Rob Bradford is joined by Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia to discuss the 33-year-old's longevity, his thoughts on Tom Brady's approach and what the real deal is when it comes to who is the leader in the Red Sox' clubhouse.

[0:00:12] ... Away where you don't know why you're. Brad broad show. That's delicious. Dustin Pedroia and read he was 845. Yes. Last year on the fifth or games that's one of the best. Because of his career certainly the best since 2011. Pedroia is gonna turn 34. This season. And what he's on target for is at least worth conversation when it comes to the hall of fame. He's tracking actually ahead of one of the guys just getting Craig Biggio. It's an interesting conversation is it also interesting. Just to talk about Pedroia is lot life. In terms of where he fits ...
[0:01:21] ... clubhouse every day you don't really get a good grasp Bob as Brian Butterfield third base coach and infield coach. Explain to me just locker room the other day. Wanted to be good this. If you ...
[0:02:17] ... prepared for this week please. Freedom. Series a little sit down with Dustin Pedroia. Who always done is found himself. At the elder statesman of the Boston Red Sox. Making guys second appearance on the Bradford showed Dustin Pedroia Dustin we've known each other for a long time correct. Unfortunately. When it when when was the first recollection. For you coming ...
[0:11:26] ... And I talked enough I guess I'm over blowing the evolution of Dustin Pedroia because you've always been awesome since the age of two. But. Is the a lot of people go hating and a lot of people have into this year but people had in this here. And say oh well Davis gone Dustin Pedroia is going to be the guy it was a you know the Rudy on top of them on top of the stool ...






FORT MYERS, Fla. — In the informal setting that is spring training, the sight of Ruben Amaro manning the third base coaching box instead of Brian Butterfield for the first few games didn’t get on many observer’s radar. But the switch is actually the result of the Red Sox’ master plan to get Butterfield in game shape.

Brian Butterfield (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

Brian Butterfield (Jasen Vinlove/USA Today Sports)

FORT MYERS, Fla. — In the informal setting that is spring training, the sight of Ruben Amaro manning the third base coaching box instead of Brian Butterfield for the first few games didn’t get on many observer’s radar. But the switch is actually the result of the Red Sox’ master plan to get Butterfield in game shape.

The 58-year-old Butterfield is just a couple of months off his second knee replacement in as many years, this time replacing the right one.

“I just want to be ready to go come April,” Butterfield said. “I’m on the field for some of our stuff, but when I stay on my feet right now for longer than a couple of hours I have to get off it.

“The left one I call Gale Sayers because that one is really good right now. The right one is Billy Buck because I’m not able to move on it. Hopefully this one becomes Gale Sayers. Two Gale Sayers I think I’ll get probably 120 yards on 20 totes.”

And of course, when referencing the preseason strategy, the Maine native can’t go without comparing his plight to a New England Patriot. Rob Gronkowski doesn’t need these practice games, so why should his No. 1 fan, right? (He wears No. 55 in honor of former Patriot Willie McGinest.)

“He’s a talented guy so he doesn’t, but I do. I really do need it,” Butterfield said. “I would like to be out there and I would like to be out there watching everything and doing everything. I haven’t swung the fungo yet because there’s a little twist and turn that is blowing it up. My mother called me the other day and said, ‘You don’t want to be a gimp. You haven’t been able to run for four years. Take care of that thing.’ I told her I dream of running again. I had one two nights ago, so that must mean I’m getting closer.”

With the success of his left knee replacement last season, Butterfield is optimistic the surgeries will allow him to continue doing what he’s been doing since 1994, serve as a major league coach.

“Right now, forever,” Butterfield said when asked how long he wants to continue coaching. “I enjoy the preparation. I enjoy this time of year. We have a great group of kids. I’m really excited that I might have two good legs again. The physical part, if you’re not physically right, that wears you down mentally, and that gets you thinking about your future. Do I want to continue to doing this if I keep having problem moving? But I have a chance to be a new man. I feel like if I get these wheels better I can go for a long time.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

FORT MYERS, Fla. — It was one quick comment at the end of an excruciatingly long spring training game, but it warranted some attention.

Six starters, five spots. John Farrell surfaced a scenario.