ANAHEIM, Calif. — The return of Craig Kimbrel appears imminent.

After the closer’s 17-pitch outing with the Pawtucket Red Sox Saturday — in which he allowed a leadoff single, hit a batter and induced a ground ball to first base — Kimbrel is slated to join the Red Sox Monday in Seattle.

Craig Kimbrel. (Steve Mitchell/USA Today Sports)

Craig Kimbrel. (Steve Mitchell/USA Today Sports)

ANAHEIM, Calif. — The return of Craig Kimbrel appears imminent.

After the closer’s 17-pitch outing with the Pawtucket Red Sox Saturday — in which he allowed a leadoff single, hit a batter and induced a ground ball to first base — Kimbrel is slated to join the Red Sox Monday in Seattle.

“We’ll wait till he arrives before we go through an exam with him, make sure everything is a go,” said Red Sox manager John Farrell after his team’s 5-2 loss to the Angels Saturday night. “And then beyond that, a determination will be made of activation on Monday and a corresponding move at that point.”

The appearance with the PawSox was Kimbrel’s only rehab outing since undergoing surgery on his left knee July 11. Monday would be three weeks out from an operation the Red Sox identified as needing 3-6 weeks to recover from.

Kimbrel had thrown multiple bullpen sessions prior to the Triple-A start, including a session off the Fenway Park mound prior to the Red Sox’ Wednesday afternoon game.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ANAHEIM, Calif — The American League East has a new first-place team, and the Wild Card standings are starting to bunch up.

And don’t think David Ortiz hasn’t taken notice.

“(We need to) get better, ’cause we got some other teams right there,” said the Red Sox designated hitter. “They’re sniffing on us.”

David Ortiz

David Ortiz

ANAHEIM, Calif — The American League East has a new first-place team, and the Wild Card standings are starting to bunch up.

And don’t think David Ortiz hasn’t taken notice.

“(We need to) get better, ’cause we got some other teams right there,” said the Red Sox designated hitter. “They’re sniffing on us.”

The Red Sox continued to teeter on the brink of genuine concern, dropping a 5-2 decision to the Angels to fall two games in back of first-place Toronto. In the Wild Card standings, the Sox are 1 1/2 games in back of the Orioles, one game up on Detroit and 1 1/2 games ahead of Houston.

Considering the Sox have lost five of their last six, and seven of nine, Ortiz understands urgency is starting to set in.

“Not good,” the DH said of the latest downturn. “It’s just you’re working through that funk, where it’s kind of hard to just put it together. That’s what it has been this past week.”

Asked if the younger players understands the magnitude of what approaches them in what is shaping up to be wild pennant race, Ortiz said, “They do. They better.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ANAHEIM, Calif. — A lackluster Drew Pomeranz performance, and a bunch of runners left on base.

There’s your answer to why the Red Sox are back trying to rediscover the momentum they thought had been harnessed Friday night.

Drew Pomeranz had his second subpar as a member of the Red Sox, Saturday night. (Richard Mackson/USA Today Sports)

Drew Pomeranz had his second subpar as a member of the Red Sox, Saturday night. (Richard Mackson/USA Today Sports)

ANAHEIM, Calif. — A lackluster Drew Pomeranz performance, and a bunch of runners left on base.

There’s your answer to why the Red Sox are back trying to rediscover the momentum they thought had been harnessed Friday night.

For the second time in his three starts with his new team, Pomeranz allowed as many as five runs, this time giving up five over 5 1/3 innings (throwing just 79 pitches). That, coupled with the Red Sox the Red Sox going 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, paved the way to a 5-2 Angels win over John Farrell’s team.

It’s not as if Pomeranz and the Red Sox didn’t have their chances. The starter was staked with a 2-0 lead by the time he took the mound in the first (with Mookie Betts hitting a home run to leadoff the game). But the lefty couldn’t hold the lead, giving it up for good on Albert Pujols’ two-run homer in the third inning.

Pomeranz, who only allowed five or more runs twice in 17 starts with the Padres, now owns a 7.53 ERA with the Red Sox. Coming into the game, the southpaw had posted a 2.32 ERA and .166 opponents batting average in nine road starts.

With the loss, the Red Sox fall two games in back of the new leader in the American League East, Toronto.

For a complete box score, click here.
Closing Time note

Dustin Pedroia has now reached base safely in 33 straight games, walking twice before his sixth-inning single.

WHAT WENT WRONG

– Bryce Brentz limited what could have been an enormous first inning, striking out with the bases loaded to end what ended up being a two-run frame. Two innings later, Brentz suffered the same fate, with Santiago once again fanning the righty hitter with the bases full.

– Coming in with one out in the sixth inning, Joe Kelly couldn’t help Pomeranz’s line, allowing a run-scoring double off the bat of Jett Bandy on just the second pitch he threw.

– The Red Sox couldn’t muster nearly enough off Angels starter Hector Santiago, who threw 119 pitches in just five innings. The lefty finished his night allowing two runs on four hits and six walks while striking out six.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

– Xander Bogaerts made a Derek Jeter-esque play in the seventh inning, ranging deep in the hole between third base and shortstop to field Yunel Escobar’s grounder and throw out the Angels baserunner.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Drew Pomeranz had his second subpar as a member of the Red Sox, Saturday night. (Richard Mackson/USA Today Sports)

Drew Pomeranz had his second subpar as a member of the Red Sox, Saturday night. (Richard Mackson/USA Today Sports)

ANAHEIM, Calif. — A lackluster Drew Pomeranz performance, and a bunch of runners left on base.

There’s your answer to why the Red Sox are back trying to rediscover the momentum they thought had been harnessed Friday night.

For the second time in his three starts with his new team, Pomeranz allowed as many as five runs, this time giving up five over 5 1/3 innings (throwing just 79 pitches). That, coupled with the Red Sox the Red Sox going 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, paved the way to a 5-2 Angels win over John Farrell’s team.

It’s not as if Pomeranz and the Red Sox didn’t have their chances. The starter was staked with a 2-0 lead by the time he took the mound in the first (with Mookie Betts hitting a home run to leadoff the game). But the lefty couldn’t hold the lead, giving it up for good on Albert Pujols’ two-run homer in the third inning.

Pomeranz, who only allowed five or more runs twice in 17 starts with the Padres, now owns a 7.53 ERA with the Red Sox. Coming into the game, the southpaw had posted a 2.32 ERA and .166 opponents batting average in nine road starts.

With the loss, the Red Sox fall two games in back of the new leader in the American League East, Toronto.

For a complete box score, click here.
Closing Time note

Dustin Pedroia has now reached base safely in 33 straight games, walking twice before his sixth-inning single.

WHAT WENT WRONG

– Bryce Brentz limited what could have been an enormous first inning, striking out with the bases loaded to end what ended up being a two-run frame. Two innings later, Brentz suffered the same fate, with Santiago once again fanning the righty hitter with the bases full.

– Coming in with one out in the sixth inning, Joe Kelly couldn’t help Pomeranz’s line, allowing a run-scoring double off the bat of Jett Bandy on just the second pitch he threw.

– The Red Sox couldn’t muster nearly enough off Angels starter Hector Santiago, who threw 119 pitches in just five innings. The lefty finished his night allowing two runs on four hits and six walks while striking out six.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

– Xander Bogaerts made a Derek Jeter-esque play in the seventh inning, ranging deep in the hole between third base and shortstop to field Yunel Escobar’s grounder and throw out the Angels baserunner.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Since his last start, there has been a lot of talk concerning what went wrong with Steven Wright when he surrendered eight runs against Detroit.

One of the suggestions to help Wright battle the kind of elements (hot and humid) which has usually plagued the pitcher was the idea of helping limit the moisture on the knuckleballers forearms by wearing sleeves.

Steven Wright is confident he has a solid handle on handling the elements. (David Butler/USA Today Sports)

Steven Wright is confident he has a solid handle on handling the elements. (David Butler/USA Today Sports)

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Since his last start, there has been a lot of talk concerning what went wrong with Steven Wright when he surrendered eight runs against Detroit.

One of the suggestions to help Wright battle the kind of elements (hot and humid) which has usually plagued the pitcher was the idea of helping limit the moisture on the knuckleballers forearms by wearing sleeves.

But Wright said Saturday that when he takes the mound Sunday at Angel Stadium, there will be no differences.

“I don’t feel like I need to wear sleeves,” he said. “I haven’t had an issue with sweat.”

Asked if he has talked through the issue with Red Sox manager John Farrell, Wright said he hadn’t. “I don’t think it’s a discussion that needs to be had,” he said.

But Saturday morning Wright did lean on somebody to help keep trending in the right direction for the regular season’s final two months. That came when he met up with former knuckleballer Charlie Hough for breakfast at the Red Sox’ team hotel.

“He’s awesome. I always make it a point to come out to California to get in touch with him,” Wright said of the 68-year-old Hough. “I definitely talk to [Tim Wakefield] more, but I talk to Charlie to hear his opinions, too, because he was so successful, as was Wake. I like both of their opinions because even thoiugh they threw the same pitch, their terminology and mindset are different.”

The brunt of Hough’s message to Wright this time was that all knuckleballers go through rough spots, like the the Red Sox’ pitcher has in two of his last four outings.

It’s not up to Wright to heed Hough’s suggestion and zero in on what went two starts ago, when the Sox pitcher gave up just two runs over eight innings, instead of obsessing over the last outing.

“They expect us to be robots and be perfect, and when you’re not it’s like, ‘Whoa!’ If you’re doing well and you have a bad outing, people are surprised, which is good,” Wright said. “People expect you to go out and do well every time, which is what I expect, too. But we’re only human.

“Every pitcher goes through it. Just like hitters. They’re going to go through they’re time in the season. It’s baseball. You play the whole season and you hope you limit the damage when you’re having a bad outing.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ANAHEIM, Calif. — As the non-waiver trade deadline approaches, John Farrell is optimistic about what the Red Sox have coming back for the regular season’s final two months.