The Red Sox seemingly escaped another potential huge setback when it was determined Mike Napoli’€™s left ring finger was dislocated and not broken.

Napoli hurt the finger sliding head-first into second base while advancing on a wild pitch in the ninth inning of what would be a 2-1 Red Sox loss to the White Sox in Chicago.

The Red Sox seemingly escaped another potential huge setback when it was determined Mike Napoli’€™s left ring finger was dislocated and not broken.

Napoli hurt the finger sliding head-first into second base while advancing on a wild pitch in the ninth inning of what would be a 2-1 Red Sox loss to the White Sox in Chicago.

“It’€™s not broke,” he told reporters. “I can play with some soreness. We’€™ll see how it feels tomorrow.

He added, “I saw my finger sideways. The first thing I thought was, I don’€™t really know what to think. But I’€™ve seen people with dislocated fingers before. They pop it back in, be sore.”

At the time, it appeared as though Napoli had made an important baserunning decision, getting into scoring position with the game tied at 1-1. He would immediately be pinch-run for by Dustin Pedroia, who was stranded after a Mike Carp ground out.

“Good dirt ball read like that, I mean, God dang,” Napoli said. “I was digging myself. I look at my finger, frigging sideways. But it’€™s good news it’€™s not broken.”

Napoli also told reporters, “I know I hit the bag pretty hard and I looked down and it was right there in front of my face. [Umpire] Jim Joyce was going, ‘€˜Oh my God!’€™ and calling for the trainer. It’€™ll be all right.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

A cold night got much colder by the end of the evening for the Red Sox.

A cold night got much colder by the end of the evening for the Red Sox.

With two outs in the ninth inning, Xander Bogaerts one-hopped what appeared to be a routine throw to first on a Marcus Semien grounder. First baseman Mike Carp failed to dig the ball out, allowing Alexei Ramirez to score the winning run all the way from second, handing the White Sox a 2-1 win over the Red Sox on a frigid Tuesday night in Chicago.

The final pitch was thrown by reliever Chris Capuano, who appeared to have struck out Semien the pitch before on a checked swing on a 2-2 fastball. The Red Sox lefty had come on with one out and Ramirez on first, with Burke Badenhop having allowed a single to the White Sox shortstop.

Making matters worst for the Red Sox was that Mike Napoli dislocated his left ring finger sliding head-first into second base in the ninth inning. The first baseman was advancing to second on a wild pitch. He would be immediately replaced by Dustin Pedroia, walking off the field with Red Sox trainer Rick Jameyson.

Here is what went wrong (and right) for the Red Sox:

WHAT WENT WRONG

- Peavy’s only miscue came to former teammate Adam Dunn, who pulled a 92 mph fastball from the Red Sox pitcher over the right field fence to give the White Sox a 1-0 lead in the second inning.

- Ryan Roberts continued to struggle since joining the Red Sox, going 0-for-3 with two strikeouts before being pinch-hit for by  Carp. Roberts is now 2-for-14 this season.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

- A.J. Pierzynski threw out his second runner of the season, gunning down Alejandro De Aza for the first out of Chicago’s half of the ninth inning. Pierzynski also drew his first walk of the season, having drawn just three free passes in the entire second half of the 2013 season.

- Peavy turned in another stellar outing, this time allowing just one run over six innings. The righty would strike out eight, walk two and allow three hits in his 113-pitch outing. In three starts, Peavy has now allowed just four runs over 18 2/3 innings, striking out eight in each of his last two starts.

- Daniel Nava launched his second home run of the season, taking White Sox starter Erik Johnson deep in the fourth inning. It would be the only run allowed by the White Sox starter, who had allowed 11 earned runs in 10 1/3 innings in his previous two starts.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

For Koji Uehara, the stiffness he felt in his right shoulder evoked concern based not so much on the symptoms themselves as the Red Sox closer’s history with comparable discomfort. While with the Rangers, Uehara had once experienced shoulder stiffness, tried to pitch through it and ultimately suffered a setback that led to a couple months on the disabled list.

Koji Uehara expects to be available to pitch out of the bullpen by Thursday. (AP)

Koji Uehara expects to be available to pitch out of the bullpen by Thursday. (AP)

For Koji Uehara, the stiffness he felt in his right shoulder evoked concern based not so much on the symptoms themselves as the Red Sox closer’s history with comparable discomfort. While with the Rangers, Uehara had once experienced shoulder stiffness, tried to pitch through it and ultimately suffered a setback that led to a couple months on the disabled list.

This time, however, the symptoms subsided quickly, to the point where Uehara was able to have an aggressive long-toss session at Yankee Stadium on Sunday. With that behind him, it came as little surprise — but welcome news — when he was given a clean bill of health after getting checked out at Mass. General on Monday.

“It was a good feeling to know that I was able to throw from that long distance [on Sunday] and also the fact there was no structural damage [revealed by Monday's exam]. That gave me a lot of peace of mind,” Uehara told reporters through interpreter C.J. Matsumoto. “I think [the concern] was more mental, the fact I had the same kind of feeling two years ago, that was sort of a sticking point.’€

Uehara threw long toss from 200 feet and then had a pitching session on flat ground. The Sox plan for him to throw a bullpen session off a mound on Wednesday, and if that goes well, he’d be ready to return by Thursday.

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier

At first, Dustin Pedroia thought that he was just dealing with some soreness related to the ongoing rehab from his offseason surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. But when the issue persisted and worsened, he realized that he’d incurred a separate injury in his wrist when he got wiped out on a double play turn against the Brewers.

Dustin Pedroia is expected to return to the Red Sox lineup on Wednesday. (AP)

Dustin Pedroia is expected to return to the Red Sox lineup on Wednesday. (AP)

At first, Dustin Pedroia thought that he was just dealing with some soreness related to the ongoing rehab from his offseason surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. But when the issue persisted and worsened, he realized that he’d incurred a separate injury in his wrist when he got wiped out on a double play turn against the Brewers. With the soreness increasing as he continued to play and swing a bat, Pedroia started to imagine worst-case scenarios — foremost, a wrist fracture.

Much to Pedroia’s relief, those scenarios were dismissed on Monday when an exam and MRI at Mass. General revealed that he was dealing only with inflammation rather than a fracture. And so, rather than measuring his absence in weeks or months, Pedroia expects that — after receiving a cortisone injection on Monday — he’ll be able to return to the lineup on Wednesday, after missing just two starts.

“I was a little bit worried. It was getting worse every day,” Pedroia told reporters prior to the Red Sox’ game against the White Sox on Tuesday night. ”If it was broke, I would have been out a long time. It’€™s good news. Hopefully I’€™ll be in there [Wednesday]. They gave me a shot to calm everything down. Hopefully, it takes, they say 24 to 48 hours to kick in and then get out there and go.”

Pedroia said that he wanted to “strangle [manager John Farrell] and get in there” on Tuesday, but he and the team ultimately agreed that the long-term benefit of taking an extra day to rest outweighed forcing a return to the lineup for the opener of the series against the White Sox.

Ultimately, the notion that Pedroia will be available in “some limited capacity” (in Farrell’s characterization to reporters) on Tuesday and ready to return to the lineup on Wednesday comes as a relief to a team that, already without Will Middlebrooks and Shane Victorino, could ill afford to lose its best all-around player.

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier

While Dustin Pedroia avoided the disabled list when he was diagnosed with inflammation rather than a fracture of his left wrist on Monday, his day-to-day status did not mean an immediate return to the lineup.

Dustin Pedroia remains out of the Red Sox lineup for the second straight game. (AP)

Dustin Pedroia remains out of the Red Sox lineup for the second straight game. (AP)

While Dustin Pedroia avoided the disabled list when he was diagnosed with inflammation rather than a fracture of his left wrist on Monday, his day-to-day status did not mean an immediate return to the lineup. Pedroia, who was scratched on Sunday due to soreness in his wrist, is likewise out on Tuesday for the opener of a three-game series against the White Sox in Chicago. In his absence, Jonathan Herrera will play second, Ryan Roberts gets the start at third base and Grady Sizemore will lead off for the second straight contest. Sizemore is once again in left field, with Jackie Bradley Jr. remaining in center and Daniel Nava in right.

Jake Peavy and A.J. Pierzynski, longtime batterymates with the White Sox, will be paired against their former team, which will feature right-hander Erik Johnson on the mound. For complete batter vs. pitcher histories, click here. For comprehensive Red Sox coverage, visit weei.com/redsox.

RED SOX LINEUP

Grady Sizemore, LF

Xander Bogaerts, SS

David Ortiz, DH

Mike Napoli, 1B

Daniel Nava, RF

A.J. Pierzynski, C

Ryan Roberts, 3B

Jackie Bradley Jr., CF

Jonathan Herrera, 2B

Jake Peavy, SP

 

Blog Author: 
Alex Speier