In and around the Red Sox' 3-1 win over Orioles, Friday night, it was clear there had been some alterations since Fenway Park last saw their hometown team.



For those New Englanders who believe in the notion of a Red Sox Nation, July 24 must be considered the culture’s independence day.

From a symbolic standpoint, it was five years ago today that Red Sox history altered irrevocably. On July 24, 2004, the Red Sox claimed perhaps the most important regular-season win in franchise history.



This is Theo Epstein before last night:
 



Lots and lots of Dwight Evans vs. Jim Rice here this week.  The email was probably about 70-30 pro-Dewey, which surprised me more than a little. But the Rice crowd won’t give up the ghost.



KIRK MINIHANE

BIO | ARCHIVE




Normally this space is reserved for "Five Things We Learned" regarding the previous night's Red Sox game. Yet that hardly seems appropriate after the Sox' latest loss, a 6-3 defeat at the hands of the Texas Rangers.







KIRK MINIHANE

BIO | ARCHIVE


The phrase is becoming almost redundant: bad day for the Red Sox leadoff hitter.



Brad Penny was remarkably consistent while putting together a solid half season body of work in Boston prior to the All-Star break, and headed into Saturday’s start with a stretch of six straight outings during which he’d allowed three runs or less.



JOE HAGGERTY

BIO | ARCHIVE | BIG BAD BLOG