Major League Baseball announced Tuesday afternoon David Ortiz has been suspended one game and fined an undisclosed amount for making contact with home plate umpire John Tumpane during the bottom of the fifth inning of Sunday’s loss to the Orioles.

Major League Baseball announced Tuesday afternoon David Ortiz has been suspended one game and fined an undisclosed amount for making contact with home plate umpire John Tumpane during the bottom of the fifth inning of Sunday’s loss to the Orioles.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Xander Bogaerts, who has gone three straight games without a hit, will start Tuesday night’s game at Tropicana Field on the bench, with Brock Holt getting the nod at shortstop.

Brock Holt

Brock Holt

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Xander Bogaerts, who has gone three straight games without a hit, will start Tuesday night’s game at Tropicana Field on the bench, with Brock Holt getting the nod at shortstop.

Holt, who comes into the game hitting .462, will hit eighth against Tampa Bay starter Chris Archer.

Also getting the start is Daniel Nava, who slots in at first base for Mike Napoli. Napoli is 1-for-12 against Archer, while Nava comes in hitting .556 (5-for9) with four walks against the righty.

Here is the rest of the Red Sox lineup with Wade Miley on the mound for the visitors:

Mookie Betts CF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
David Ortiz DH
Hanley Ramirez LF
Pablo Sandoval 3B
Daniel Nava 1B
Shane Victorino RF
Brock Holt SS
Ryan Hanigan C

For all the matchups, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Major League Baseball announced Tuesday afternoon David Ortiz has been suspended one game and fined an undisclosed amount for making contact with home plate umpire John Tumpane during the bottom of the fifth inning of Sunday’s loss to the Orioles.

Ortiz was ejected for arguing balls and strikes as he disagreed with third base umpire Jerry Meals, who said he went around on a check swing. The designated hitter dropped his bat in the middle of the at-bat, and after a short argument with Meals was ejected by Tumpane with Ortiz apparently making contact with him.

There was also a disagreement in the first inning between Ortiz and Meals on another check swing.

Ortiz has filed an appeal, so he will be in the lineup Tuesday in Tampa.

For more Red Sox news, check out weei.com/redsox.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and Orioles analyst Jim Palmer joined Middays with MFB Tuesday to discuss his tweets from over the weekend about David Ortiz and him being ejected from Sunday’s game for arguing balls and strikes a

Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and Orioles analyst Jim Palmer joined Middays with MFB Tuesday to discuss his tweets from over the weekend about David Ortiz and him being ejected from Sunday’s game for arguing balls and strikes after a check swing. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

Ortiz didn’t like what Palmer said and responded on Monday. Tuesday, Palmer clarified what he meant, and said he has a lot of respect for Ortiz and what he is as a player, as well as what he’s done for the Red Sox and baseball in general.

Palmer felt Ortiz should have used better judgement and not have gotten thrown out because of his value to the Red Sox.

“I just think as a player, your allegiance and your better sense should be in line with what your ball club is trying to do,” Palmer said. “David Ortiz is one heck of a hitter. On his way 500 home runs, he may be the best DH ever. He’s won a lot of games. You think back when he went 11-for-16 in the World Series and had an on-base percentage of 75 percent of the time, was one of the reasons why the Sox won the series in 2013. I don’t think anyone forgets that.”

Added Palmer: “I think maybe it’s a lesson, if I am Mookie Betts — and David may end up getting suspended for this because of his actions afterwards. It will be very interesting what Major League Baseball does. He’s a mentor. He’s a role model for all the young Red Sox.”

Palmer said he also felt like third base umpire Jerry Meals overreacted and may have played a role in Ortiz becoming more and more upset.

“It was an overreaction by [Jerry Meals], but David is the guy that allows the Red Sox to win ball games not the umpire and I just think he lost his cool a little bit,” Palmer said. “I have no animosity towards David. I think he’s a fantastic player. I know what he’s done in the community. I know how important he’s been to the Red Sox. That wasn’t my point. I was just tweeting about what he did on Sunday and I think what I’ve alluded to over the last 48 hours I’ve made that perfectly clear.”

Palmer said he wants to talk to Ortiz to clear the air, potentially when the Red Sox are in Baltimore over the weekend. He also said he would criticize a player on the Orioles who did the same thing.

The former pitcher also touched on Friday night’s ejection of Ubaldo Jimenez for hitting Pablo Sandoval. Palmer said he thought the Orioles had a right to be upset with Sandoval.

“You get umpires, especially young umpires that just don’t have a real good feel for the game. I mean, they are instructed to do certain things,” said Palmer. “I honestly thought that Pablo Sandoval — it was a late slide, I wouldn’t have been happy if I was sitting on the bench and I saw my second baseman get contacted. You don’t want guys sliding through the bag, yeah I know the rule says you have to be able to touch the bag, but when they go spikes up to the other side of the bag, somebody gets hurt. So I wouldn’t have been happy about that.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — One year ago, Kevin Cash was beginning his second season as Indians bullpen coach. That came after two years as an advance scout for the Blue Jays.

Things are looking up for Kevin Cash in his first year as Rays manager. (Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

Things are looking up for Kevin Cash in his first year as Rays manager. (Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — One year ago, Kevin Cash was beginning his second season as Indians bullpen coach. That came after two years as an advance scout for the Blue Jays. And just before that — five years ago — he found himself retiring from big league baseball at the age of 32 after appearing in 29 games as Red Sox backup catcher.

Now, Cash finds himself as the manager of the team the Red Sox are opposing for the next three nights — the Tampa Bay Rays.

“Not at all,” said Cash by phone when asked if he could have imagined at this time last year he’d be in his current position. “It’s very weird. Not in the slightest.”

What transpired over the course of just a few months turned Cash’s world upside down without warning.

First came an interview with the Rangers for their managerial opening. Then Texas offered him its bench coach job (which he declined). Then came another call, this one from the Rays for another interview to manage. All the while, there remained the distinct possibility he could find his way back to the Red Sox as bench coach if Torey Lovullo was hired to manage in Minnesota.

All of it came with very little warning, happening in seemingly a blink of an eye.

“[Ron Washington] stepped down and Texas gave the Indians the head’s up that they would be calling when the season ended. I don’t want to say I had doubts, but it wasn’t certainly like I was gung-ho that I could do this because I wasn’t even remotely thinking about it,” Cash said. “Obviously Tito [Cleveland manager Terry Francona] allowed me to do a lot of things that a typical bullpen coach doesn’t do, so that helped. But I know I wasn’t sitting there thinking I could be a big league manager, by any means.”

A couple of interviews are one thing, but actually getting the job is another. Yet that’s exactly what the Tampa native did, with a little help from his former employers.

“The way [the Indians] prepped me was basically unheard of,” Cash said. “I went in and did a mock interview. I got dressed up. They told me to put a suit and tie on and made me as uncomfortable as possible and asked me some very difficult questions.

“It without a doubt helped. It was very, very nerve-wracking because they asked some very direct and pointed questions about the Indians team. Why did you do this? Why did you say this to this player? Why weren’t you able to connect to this player? It put me on the spot. The way they prepped me, it wasn’t going to get much more intense.”

What also helped Cash land the job was the diverse background he had ventured through in a relatively short amount of time. Each experience, he explained, meant something to seeing what it might take to become a big league manager.

PLAYING: “Getting to play, I was extremely fortunate to play on some good teams. Even though I wasn’t good, I got to play around some really good players and watch how really good players went about their business and daily routines. David Ortiz, the pitchers, Manny [Ramirez], everybody. It seemed like we had an All-Star team at every position for two years, and to watch them, hang out with them and see what they go through on a daily basis was key. I already have a perspective on my own of what it’s like to be the 24th roster player and how difficult that can be to appreciate that guy.”

SCOUTING: “The best thing about being an advance scout was getting to sit in the stands with the other major league scouts and pro scouts and hear their perspective. You get away from the field and hear a different view of it. How they watch player, what they’re looking for. You separate yourself from the game. You’re very much in tune with the game, but there are a lot of very good scouts in this game who provide a lot of knowledge.”

COACHING: “The bullpen coach thing, obviously that was extremely beneficial in terms of being on the coaching staff. You’re not by any stretch the manager, but you’re managing during that three-hour time that seven- or eight-pitcher group. You’re the manager down there. It’s a third of the team, but for three hours every night, that’s where we’re at. They’re not looking at the pitching coach or the manager when they’re warming up, so you have to have something for them.”

Now that he’s in the seat, he has a new appreciation for pieces of the job that might go unrecognized by most, and he doesn’t hesitate when asked about the trickiest aspects of the job.

“Running the bullpen,” Cash said. “You know that’s tough. A lot of people tell you that it’s the toughest thing. But maybe you don’t have the appreciation for how difficult it can be at times when stuff speeds up and you’re trying to figure out who the opposing team might pull off the bench to pinch hit and things like that.

“Then the media component, not that it’s tough, because the media has been great, but it’s a lot. There’s a lot of talking. (As a player,) it was basically once every five days. ‘Is Wake’s ball knuckling or not?’ Yes or no, and then see you. I certainly didn’t have to talk about any offensive production.”

But at the end of the day, even after the six-months whirlwind, Cash seems comfortable in his new surroundings. Despite coming off a three-game sweep at the hands of the Yankees, his team is in the thick of things with a 6-7 record.

While offensively challenged, the Rays have gotten solid starting pitching (even with the likes of Drew Smyly, Alex Cobb and Matt Moore on the shelf), while playing outstanding defense. (Tampa Bay has made just 3 errors.)

“I like our team,” Cash said.

It’s his team. Six months ago, who would have thought it?

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Having at the very least temporarily reclaimed first place in the division, the Red Sox are taking a road trip to visit the two AL East teams they haven’t yet faced this season. To start, Boston will head down to Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida, for a three-game set with the Rays.

The Sox are coming off a series split with the Orioles and have yet to lose a series this season, as they won their first three.

“I would imagine we’re going to be neck-and-neck with most everybody in this division throughout,” manager John Farrell said Monday. “Anytime you can come away with the final game of a series to earn a split — whether it’s home or road — it sends us off on a positive note.”

The Red Sox took a rain-shortened 7-1 victory over Baltimore on Monday, capitalizing on the Orioles’ three errors. So far this season, Boston has crossed the plate 18 times on 20 errors opposing teams have committed. The Sox are 6-0 when scoring the first run.

The Red Sox have a bit of a problem, though. For all the offense they generate, as they have scored the fourth-most runs in the majors, the Sox have allowed the fifth-most runs to be scored on them. Of the other teams in the top 10 for scoring, only two besides the Sox are also in the top 10 for runs allowed, and none others are in the top five. In fact, the Red Sox are the only team more than one game above .500 in the top 10 for runs allowed.

Currently occupying the fourth spot in the divisional standings, Tampa Bay is sitting one game below .500 (6-7). After starting the season with two losses to the Orioles, the Rays managed a 2-0 win in their series finale with Baltimore before going on to win their next series against the Marlins. Tampa managed to nab two wins in Toronto against the Blue Jays, but comes into Tuesday’s matchup riding a three-game losing streak as a result of being swept by the Yankees over the weekend.

The Red Sox will get pitchers one, two and three of the Rays rotation, and two of them are toting sub-2.00 ERAs. Despite that, Tampa is seventh in the league in earned runs with 59 total. And while the Rays offense is struggling, scoring the 15th-most runs in the league and posting a .226 batting average, good for 20th, the team’s pitching staff is holding opposing batters to a league sixth-best .221 average.

In 19 games against Tampa last year, the Red Sox just about split the season series, recording a 9-10 mark.

Here are the pitching matchups for the series:

Wade Miley (0-1, 10.57) vs. Chris Archer (2-1, 1.37)
Joe Kelly (1-0, 2.13) vs. Nathan Karns (1-1, 4.58)
Clay Buchholz (1-2, 6.06) vs. Jake Odorizzi (2-1, 1.74)

WHO’S HOT: RED SOX

— Brock Holt continues to do Brock Holt things, recording at least one hit in six of his last seven games. The super sub’s average fell to .462 from .500 after going 0-for-2 in Monday’s game against the Orioles, and he has two doubles and five RBIs so far.

— After two starts, Joe Kelly’s ERA at 2.13 is a full three points lower than any other starting pitcher in the rotation. Slated to take the mound in the middle game of the series, Kelly struggled a bit in his most recent campaign, lasting 5 2/3 innings and tossing over 118 pitches. In what was a bit of a grind of a start, he allowed two runs on four hits.

Craig Breslow is quietly bolstering the bullpen with a 0.00 ERA through 9 2/3 innings pitched. His most recent appearance was during Boston’s Sunday loss when he pitched three innings of two-hit baseball with three strikeouts. So far this season, the lefty has eight K’s, five walks and just three hits allowed.

Steven Souza

Steven Souza

WHO’S HOT: RAYS

— Of Rays with at least 40 at-bats, Steven Souza Jr. is pacing the team with 13 hits, good for a .289 batting average. Through 13 games the right fielder has two doubles, three home runs, six walks and 10 RBIs, the most of anyone on the team. He also leads the team in strikeouts, though, with 19.

— Chris Archer, with his 1.37 ERA, is 14th among starting pitchers in that regard. He is averaging 9.61 strikeouts per nine innings. Paired with his 1.83 walks per nine, Archer is toting a 5.25 strikeout-to-walk ratio. The righty is holding opposing batters to a .136 average.

— Slightly lower down on the list, Jake Odorizzi is 19th in the league with a 1.74 ERA and third in opponent batting average, holding teams to hit .129 against him. Odorizzi is averaging 8.27 strikeouts per nine in 20 2/3 innings pitched. Each of his three starts were quality, as he lasted at least six innings in each one and has yet to give up more than three runs.

WHO’S NOT: RED SOX

— After his impressive series against the Nationals, Mookie Betts had his six-game hitting streak come to an end in Boston’s first game against Baltimore. In fact, he didn’t register a hit against the O’s until the final game of the series, finishing 1-for-11 and lowering his batting average to .196.

Mike Napoli continues to struggle at the plate, going 2-for-13 in the Baltimore series, and has yet to record a multi-hit game. Though he’s drawing more and more walks, steadily increasing his on-base percentage, he has one extra-base hit on the year and just recorded his first RBI of the season Monday after drawing a bases-loaded walk.

— Of the Red Sox roster, none is more Jekyll and Hyde than the starting staff. Almost through the third go-round of the rotation, all but one pitcher has an ERA over 5.50, though they all have shown signs of how good they can be. After beginning the year with a scoreless seven innings, Clay Buchholz then earned nine runs in 3 1/3 innings but bounced back for a six-inning, two-run campaign in his third start. Similarly, Justin Masterson recorded a quality start in his first outing, allowing two runs in six innings, but then gave up seven in 4 2/3 innings his next time out. His most recent start was cut short by the rain, but he had one earned run on three hits and six strikeouts through five innings. Rick Porcello allowed just three runs in each of his first two starts, lasting at least six innings in both, but struggled on Sunday against the Orioles and surrendered eight runs on 12 hits in five innings. Wade Miley followed the trend as well, allowing two runs in 5 1/3 innings of four-hit ball in his first start but then giving up seven runs in 2 1/3 innings against the Nats.

WHO’S NOT: RAYS

— A career .270 hitter, Evan Longoria is having trouble getting his bat going this season. Through 40 at-bats, he has just eight hits, five for extra bases, for a .200 average and two RBIs. In Tampa Bay’s series against the Yankees, Longoria finished 1-for-9 with one strikeout and one walk.

— After starting the season with eight hits in his first 25 at-bats, Asdrubal Cabrera is 2-for-27 since. With five RBIs on the season, he ranks fourth on the team in driving in runs, but he has just one RBI in his last seven games.

– Rene Rivera, a .500 hitter against Wade Miley in six plate appearances, is batting just .119 this season. Though he’s not a particularly prolific hitter in terms of his career, Rivera failed to get a hit until his sixth game of the season when he went 3-for-4 against the Marlins on April 12. In the following seven games, Rivera has two hits in 22 at-bats. He has walked just once all season and has struck out five times in his last four games.

Blog Author: 
Judy Cohen