Curt Schilling talks Hall of Fame voting

[0:00:00] ... Curt Schilling yesterday ends up sixth place overall to wonder and thirty of boats the good news is he's up over 50% exit 52 ...
[0:01:50] ... and and play against guys like you know there. There that are Scott Rolen at that. The bat well their whole payments so that there's so there's no doubt hall of famers and the fact that there aren't and makes it okay and then I. You realize that I think human process which means it's gonna be flawed it's gonna be subjective it's going to be. Well I really. Somebody wrote something about it they're they're voting ballot voted and they said. Know Curt Schilling only want to learn seventeen games and then when they would talk about small they're like yeah he won 214 games and ...
[0:05:36] ... that didn't understand baseball they would know what to Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds those guys are these. The poster children they are the faces of our in my generation of our generation of players. And ...
[0:09:04] ... people that do it. Take that series. And heavy from Anaheim Jia Garret Anderson and echoed. Oh. Baltimore really good players yeah I just hate the power these guy I hate the power that these writers ...






Jared Carrabis, fresh off being named Barstool Sports’ full-time MLB writer, joins Rob Bradford. The pair talk Carrabis’ path to his current lot in life, while also exploring the reporter vs. blogger dynamic. Some Red Sox talk is also mixed in.

Now that there is a definitive end date to his career, David Ortiz can talk about the Hall of Fame with a bit more purpose. That’s exactly what he did when sitting down to talk about the subject at his celebrity golf tournament.

Now that there is a definitive end date to his career, David Ortiz can talk about the Hall of Fame with a bit more purpose. That’s exactly what he did when sitting down to talk about the subject at his celebrity golf tournament.

“I am,” said the Red Sox designated hitter when asked if he was optimistic he would eventually be inducted into Cooperstown. “I think I did, and still do, what I’m supposed to. So, that’s all I can control.

“Numbers-wise, it shouldn’€™t be a problem because that’€™s what the Hall of Fame is all about. Numbers and not being someone being part of controversy, so I guess on that side of it I think I’€™m doing OK. Getting in the Hall of Fame is not an easy thing to do. There is always going to be someone who has something to say, so we’€™ll see how that plays out.”

He’s right, numbers probably won’t be Ortiz’s roadblock.

Starting with my very unscientific approach to starting the Hall of Fame conversation for position players — charting how many times they finished in the Top 10 in MVP voting (showing a dominance in their era) — the DH passes muster, accomplishing the feat six times. Conversely, new-inducted Mike Piazza reached such levels seven times, while the guy just missing out this time around, Jeff Bagwell, was a five-timer.

We also know about the 503 homers, and, of course, the historic postseason success.

Ortiz’s hurdles will be his link to performance enhancing drugs (the 2003 survey test) and the position he plays, designated hitter.

Wednesday’s results offered some additional clarity when analyzing Ortiz’s chances.

Even though neither Piazza or Bagwell have no direct link to PEDs, the suggestion that they might have dipped into that well certainly has been the reason it took them so long to get this far in the voting. But here they are.

And even the guys Curt Schilling recently called the “poster children” for the steroid era, Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds, saw jumps after staying fairly stagnant in their first three years on the ballot. Each jumped about eight percent.

But, perhaps most important for Ortiz’s candidacy, was how Edgar Martinez was viewed by voters.

Frank Thomas is the only semblance of a designated hitter in the Hall of Fame, although he played almost as many games at first base. That has left Martinez — the player the award for best DH each season is named after — as the position’s current hope to crack the Hall.

But, for Martinez, it hadn’t been going well.

In six times on the ballot, he had yet to crack 36.5 percent, dropping to 27 percent last year. And this is a guy who carried a career .312 batting average and .933 OPS over an 18-year career.

But, presumably thanks to weeding out of some of the older voters, Martinez and the DH position took a big, 16.4 percent leap forward. He now stands at 43.4 percent. That, along with closer Trevor Hoffman getting a whopping 67.3 percent on his first try, was an enormous step toward silencing positional bias.

Here’s a guess: If Martinez cracks 50 percent — which it would seem a very real possibility — Ortiz isn’t weighed down by the position and he is in.

“I don’€™t know,” said Ortiz when asked if there would be another designated hitter to come along like himself. “They said the same thing about Edgar Martinez, that there wasn’€™t going to be another guy born to be that good and God blessed me for being who I am. So I don’€™t doubt that some point in baseball somebody else pops up like me, or better than me. That’€™s something that nobody can dictate.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Manny Ramirez cost himself the Hall of Fame with multiple PED violations.</p>
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When a Hall of Famer speaks, people tend to listen.

So when Hall of Fame pitcher Dennis Eckersley was asked about Pete Rose’s Hall of Fame candidacy by Mike Mutnansky on the Planet Mikey Show Wednesday night, any answer would have been noteworthy.

Pete Rose (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Pete Rose (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

When a Hall of Famer speaks, people tend to listen.

So when Hall of Fame pitcher Dennis Eckersley was asked about Pete Rose Hall of Fame candidacy by Mike Mutnansky on the Planet Mikey Show Wednesday night, any answer would have been noteworthy.

The response Eck gave, however, was above and beyond.

“People are sick of it,” Eckersley said. “I was out to Johnny Bench the other night, because he’s down here in Florida. He’s been hassled from Day 1 about Pete. Pete had an opportunity to turn his life around. That’s all he had to do. He should have copped to it a long time ago and shown that he changed his life. He had his chance. No one wants him there. No one. Just all the fans from Cincinnati. All the players know. You do not break that rule, the end.”

The place nobody evidently wants Rose is Cooperstown and the Hall of Fame. The rule that you never break is, of course, gambling on baseball, which is currently keeping the all-time hits leader banned from Major League Baseball.

(To hear Eckersley’s comments, go to the 8:57 minute mark of the following audio)

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Mikey, Mut and Bradford talk with Baseball Hall of Famer Dennis Eckersley. They talk about steroid-era guys being elected and if Pete Rose should be in the hall.

A couple of Red Sox-related Hall of Fame notes . . .

Right-hander Curt Schilling saw one of the biggest jumps of any candidate. The big right-hander shot from 39.2 percent of the vote last year to 52.3 percent this year, his fifth season on the ballot.

A couple of Red Sox-related Hall of Fame notes . . .

Right-hander Curt Schilling saw one of the biggest jumps of any candidate. The big right-hander shot from 39.2 percent of the vote last year to 52.3 percent this year, his fifth season on the ballot.

This would seem to bode well for the Big Schill, whose candidacy got mired in the PED backlog that cost a number of borderline candidates votes over the last two or three years.

Schilling has five years to gain the remaining 22.7 percent required for enshrinement, and as the years pass, his postseason accomplishments and historic strikeout-to-walk rate (4.383, greatest since 1900) should sway enough voters to his side.

Speaking on the Bradfo Show podcast recently, Schilling said he’s at peace with not getting in, even if he doesn’t understand the electorate sometimes.

“The hard part for me is I don’t want to say the things I say and diminish what I think the Hall of Fame represents,” he said. “But it is the most subjective thing I’ve ever been around. I read an article the other day about a writer that didn’t vote for me, and he didn’t vote for me because I only had 216 wins. And John Smoltz he voted for because he had 214 wins. I made peace with it a long time ago.”

One ex-Sox star who won’t be getting in is Nomar Garciaparra. The former Rookie of the Year, All-Star, and batting champ received only eight votes (1.8 percent) and lost his spot on the ballot.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase