The Red Sox are not happy with Major League Baseball.

On Thursday, Major League Baseball announced that Padres general manager A.J. Preller would be suspended for submitting false medical records to the Red Sox while completing the trade of Drew Pomeranz for top prospect Anderson Espinoza.

Tom Werner

Tom Werner

The Red Sox are not happy with Major League Baseball.

On Thursday, Major League Baseball announced that Padres general manager A.J. Preller would be suspended for submitting false medical records to the Red Sox while completing the trade of Drew Pomeranz for top prospect Anderson Espinoza.

The Red Sox filed a complaint, but did not ask to have the deal reversed. Preller was suspended for 30 games, while the Red Sox did not get anything to make up for what happened. This is what appears to have irked the Red Sox.

“I think it’s fair to say that we were extremely disappointed in the decision,” Red Sox chairman Tom Werner said on the NESN pregame show Friday. “We feel that some wrong was committed and it’s important to have a level playing field, and the Padres didn’t play on it.”

According to ESPN, the Padres maintained two separate databases on injured players, updating the one provided to rival teams only when a player went on the disabled list.

For Pomeranz’s reaction to what happened, click here.

For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Drew Pomeranz said he has no idea what information the San Diego Padres could’ve hidden from the Red Sox before completing their July 31 trade, which resulted in Major League Baseball suspending Padres G.M. A.J. Preller for a month.

Drew Pomeranz said has no injury the Red Sox should be worried about. (David Richard/USA Today Sports)

Drew Pomeranz said has no injury the Red Sox should be worried about. (David Richard/USA Today Sports)

Drew Pomeranz said he has no idea what information the San Diego Padres could’ve hidden from the Red Sox before completing their July 31 trade, which resulted in Major League Baseball suspending Padres G.M. A.J. Preller for a month.

“I’ve been asked about this before,” Pomeranz told WEEI.com before the Red Sox played the Yankees on Friday. “I don’t really know anything about that. That part’s above my head. I’m just the guy who got traded. I don’t know any of this stuff that’s going on, any of the back and forth. I don’t really know how the whole thing went down at all.”

MLB announced on Thursday that Preller would be suspended for submitting false medical records to the Red Sox while completing the trade for top prospect Anderson Espinoza. The Red Sox filed a complaint, but did not ask to have the deal reversed.

According to ESPN, the Padres maintained two separate databases on injured players, updating the one provided to rival teams only when a player went on the disabled list. Preventative treatment like ice or anti-inflammatories, which is logged by most teams to be shared in the event of a trade, was withheld. According to ESPN, this was the level of information the Padres did not disclose to the Red Sox.

Asked if he had received minor treatment, Pomeranz did not disclose specifics.

“I know I made all my starts,” he said. “I didn’t miss any time. I didn’t do anything. As far as I knew, when I got over here, everything went fine, but it’s above my pay grade, I guess you could say. Whatever they talked about — something, obviously — they worked it out now.”

Pomeranz is 2-5 with a 4.60 ERA since joining the Red Sox, allowing one or two earned runs in seven of his 11 starts. He went 8-7 with a 2.47 ERA in San Diego, earning his first All-Star berth.

“They wanted me here and I think I’ve pitched well,” Pomeranz said. “There’s room for improvement, but I think I’ve been doing my part. I’m happy to be here and we’re winning, in first place, and it’s great over here.”

Pomeranz has thrown 160 2/3 innings, blowing past his previous career-high of 96 2/3. He said he’s ready to make his final three starts of the season and then hopefully pitch in October.

“I’ve been asked that question about my innings limit,” he said. “I’ve thrown more than I ever have, but I feel great. I’ve got three more left in the regular season, so I’m ready to get after those.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

For the first time since signing with the Red Sox, 2016 first-round pick Jason Groome was on the field at Fenway Park in full uniform.

Prior to Friday’s Red Sox-Yankees game, Groome shagged fly balls and played catch in the outfield, as well as getting to speak with members of the current team and coaches in the outfield.

Jason Groome met with reporters after shagging fly balls and throwing in the Fenway Park outfield. (WEEI.com)

Jason Groome met with reporters after shagging fly balls and throwing in the Fenway Park outfield. (WEEI.com)

For the first time since signing with the Red Sox, 2016 first-round pick Jason Groome was on the field at Fenway Park in full uniform.

Prior to Friday’s Red Sox-Yankees game, Groome shagged fly balls and played catch in the outfield, as well as getting to speak with members of the current team and coaches in the outfield.

This is something the Red Sox typically do after their top picks first sign, but since Groome signed close to the deadline, he headed right to Florida for the Gulf Coast League.

“It still feels like a dream,” Groome said in the Red Sox dugout after batting practice. “I never thought I would be playing for the Red Sox and having my family here, it’s their first time in Boston. It’s a great feeling.”

One of the players who Groome talked to the most was Rick Porcello, as both grew up in New Jersey. The 18-year-old also said he got to meet David Ortiz, which was a huge thrill for him as he grew up with the Red Sox being his favorite team.

“It kind of feels a little weird because like I just got drafted, I am at the end of the ladder and they are all the way at the top, but it’s just like another group of teammates,” he said. “You get to meet them now and hopefully I remember your face when I get up here.”

Groome made two starts in the Gulf Coast League before two more in short-season, Single-A Lowell. Over the four starts, he allowed three earned runs in 10 innings (one run in each of his final three appearances). He was kept on a pitch count with his longest start being 3 1/3 innings. Going from the Gulf Coast League to Lowell was a big adjustment.

“Mainly just how pro ball is structured,” Groome said. “Time management was a big thing for me, so I mean, I do what I needed to do and got where I needed to be on time. That was a big step and and just the transformation from the GCL to Lowell was it felt more like professional baseball because being in Lowell still in Massachusetts there’s ton of Boston fans so actually pitching in front of a crowd now is pretty surreal.”

Given the few innings he pitched as a high school senior, Groome will pitch in the fall instructional league. He wants to work on one pitch specifically.

“For me, mainly just the command of my changeup,” Groome said. “I really didn’t throw it too much in the spring in my senior year, but I threw it a couple of times down in GCL and I threw it a couple times in Lowell, but I still just have to focus on the command of it.”

As for getting on the mound at Fenway one day, Groome is more than ready. He even would have done it Friday if he could.

“A couple of coaches were joking with me and they were like, ‘You’re going to start.’ And I was like ‘if they would let me I would totally do it,'” Groome said. “I’m ready to get out here and pitch.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

With there only being 16 games left in the regular season and the Red Sox with a good chance of making the postseason, it’s never too early to start thinking about a potential playoff roster and who will be on it.

Left-hander Robby Scott had a great outing on Thursday night. (Kelley L Cox/USA Today Sports)

Left-hander Robby Scott had a great outing on Thursday night. (Kelley L Cox/USA Today Sports)

With there only being 16 games left in the regular season and the Red Sox with a good chance of making the postseason, it’s never too early to start thinking about a potential playoff roster and who will be on it.

The Red Sox bullpen has a 0.74 ERA in the month of September — the best in baseball — with a number of players stepping up to deliver strong performances.

Given the number of great individual outings and players performing better than earlier in the year, there will be a lot of competition for the final bullpen spots, but manager John Farrell said the remaining games will not be considered an audition.

“No, it’s about what to we need to do to win tonight,” Farrell said. “Not to short-circuit the answer, but I don’t anyone is looking beyond today. And honestly, that’s the mentally we have to maintain until the last out is made whenever and wherever that is.”

One of the pitchers who has made a name for himself is left-hander Robby Scott, who was added to the roster when rosters expanded on Sept. 1.

In two appearances, Scott hasn’t allowed an earned run over four innings, which included a three inning appearance Thursday night against the Yankees, which proved key to keep the Red Sox within striking distance prior to Hanley Ramirez’s walk-off home run.

Scott made his major league debut this month as the 27-year-old has had a long journey to the big leagues.

“It was, but yet the other day in that sim game we had him throw an inning just to tune him up, sharpen him up, just to get him on the mound,” Farrell said when asked if the team took an inning-by-inning approach on Thursday with him. “As he was going through that game last night — and even if you set aside the final outcome — those three innings were key just to preserve staying away from certain guys when you’re down on the scoreboard.

“Just an incredible personal story on his part from where he’s come from, the way he’s made adjustments this year to make himself even that much more unique — all credit to him for the work that he’s put in, but I think the thing that stands out is maybe that he’s starting in Yuma, Arizona and the Independent League trail that he’s followed, there’s no fear on his part. Just a good strike-thrower with maybe not the most overpowering stuff, but the change of angles and the fearlessness certainly plays out.”

OTHER RED SOX NOTES

— Jackie Bradley Jr. was pinch-hit for in the ninth inning Thursday night by Aaron Hill with lefty Tommy Layne on the mound. Farrell noted Bradley Jr. hasn’t performed as well against lefties as in years past. This year Bradley Jr. is hitting .243 against left-handers, compared to last year when he hit .306.

“Given the fact they were looking to stay away from [Dellin] Betances, kind of thought they might look to stay with Tommy Layne for a little bit longer than one hitter,” Farrell said of the move. “You can make the debate that it should have been Young hitting and do you make the choice between [Andrew] Benintendi and a right-hander against, you know, and a move there. Again, you’re in those last inning kind of desperation mode a little bit. That’s not to say you run from a guy, but I think left-handers have kind of handcuffed Jackie a little bit this year compared to previous years. I can’t sit here today and say we’ll continue to do that. It will be dependent upon the game situation and who is available.”

— Benintendi isn’t in the lineup on Friday, but is expected to be on Saturday.

“Three weeks down, tonight with [Luis] Cessa, reverse splits with some right-handers, a little bit better performance. He’s got a good arm. He’s going to throw good stuff at us. He’s handled lefties a little bit more regularly and given the amount of time down, felt like we were going to ease Andrew back into this,” Farrell said. “I thought it was pretty impressive last night, the bat-to-ball ability after three with not having any real competition. That’s where we are.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

The Red Sox will look to make it two in a row and extend their lead even more in the AL East following Thursday’s dramatic walk-off win.

Chris Young

Chris Young

The Red Sox will look to make it two in a row and extend their lead even more in the AL East following Thursday’s dramatic walk-off win.

Chris Young will get the start in left field and Andrew Benintendi will rest as the Red Sox go up against right-hander Luis Cessa. It’s likely the Red Sox wanted to give Benintendi a down day after his first game back in over three weeks on Thursday.

Sandy Leon will catch Red Sox starter Clay Buchholz.

Here is the complete Red Sox lineup:

Dustin Pedroia, 2B
Xander Bogaerts, SS
David Ortiz, DH
Mookie Betts, RF
Hanley Ramirez, LF
Travis Shaw, 3B
Chris Young, LF
Sandy Leon, C
Jackie Bradley Jr., CF
Clay Buchholz, RHP

For an extensive look at the matchups, click here.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable