We’re starting to get an idea of what the Red Sox want in exchange for Clay Buchholz.

Clay Buchholz. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

Clay Buchholz. (Kim Klement/USA Today Sports)

We’re starting to get an idea of what the Red Sox want in exchange for Clay Buchholz.

According to the Miami Herald, the Red Sox asked for right-handed pitching prospect Luis Castillo from the Marlins when talking about a trade involving Buchholz. The Marlins reportedly had no interest in including the 23-year-old in a deal, while also shying away from paying all of the $13.5 million owed Buchholz next season.

Castillo had been part of the trade that got reeled in pitchers Andrew Cashner and Colin Rea from San Diego in July, but was sent back to the Padres after it was determined Rea’s had physical issues. (For more on that, click here.)

According to sources at the MLB Winter Meetings, it became clear the Red Sox were prioritizing dealing Buchholz over the likes of Drew Pomeranz when attempting to thin out a rotation that currently features seven legitimate starters. (For more on that, click here.)

One Marlins official recently told the Miami Herald that the team believes Castillo can emerge into a 20-game winner. Splitting time between Single-A and Double-A last season, the hard-throwing righty totaled a 2.26 ERA in 131 2/3 innings, striking out 103 and walking just 25.

If the Red Sox do acquire a minor-leaguer for Buchholz, it would mark the first time since Dave Dombrowski took over as president of baseball operations of the Red Sox acquired a player with no major league experience.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

The gamesmanship is in full swing.

Perhaps the most notable quote from the MLB Winter Meetings came from Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who compared the Red Sox to the Golden State Warriors after Dave Dombrowski’s acquisition of Chris Sale.

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Todays Sports)

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Todays Sports)

The gamesmanship is in full swing.

Perhaps the most notable quote from the MLB Winter Meetings came from Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who compared the Red Sox to the Golden State Warriors after Dave Dombrowski’s acquisition of Chris Sale.

According to Dombrowski — who addressed Cashman’s salvo when appearing on the Trenni and Tomase Show from Christmas at Fenway Saturday afternoon — this won’t be the last of the public relations poking and prodding.

“We joked, I said, ‘I know what you’re doing with this Golden State Warrior type stuff. Remember, they lost two of their first three. You have this monster back with [Aroldis] Chapman and they’re going from there.’ They are not kidding me. They are in a position where they have a very good organization. They are trying to be competitive. They still have a good team and have some good young players,” the Red Sox president of baseball operations said.

“It’s funny, because they’ll joke about, he tries to keep pressure on us. He said, ‘I’m going to say this every single day. You’re going to read about this every single day.’ I said, ‘That’s great. We’ll embrace expectations. But don’t give this Golden State Warriors stuff.'”

While the Yankees clearly are not up to the level of the Red Sox when it comes to starting pitching, they are positioned well throughout the majority of their roster, starting with a bullpen which just locked up the closer on a five-year, $85 million deal. New York also added free agent Matt Holliday to shore up it’s offense at the designated hitter spot.

“You can talk about the Cardinals and the Cubs, and you can talk about the Giants and the Dodgers. But I don’t think there is any question the No. 1 is Red Sox and Yankees and when they’re both at the top of their game, it’s good for the game of baseball,” Dombrowski said. “We want to make sure we win those, and it’s much better when the Red Sox are winning. But I think it’s good for the game of baseball.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Heading into the 2015 season, Anthony Varvaro was on the Red Sox’ Opening Day roster.

Today he is a police officer.

Anthony Varvaro

Anthony Varvaro

Heading into the 2015 season, Anthony Varvaro was on the Red Sox’ Opening Day roster.

Today he is a police officer.

The 32-year-old, who last pitched professionally as a member of the Triple-A Pawtucket Red Sox in 2016, graduated from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey police academy Friday. The New York native was one of 79 graduating in the ceremony.

Varvaro joined the Red Sox prior to the 2015 season, coming over from the Braves for minor league pitcher Aaron Kurcz.

The righty, who pitched in a combined 123 games with Atlanta from 2013-14, only saw action in nine games for the Red Sox before being designated for assignment. It was discovered that Varvaro was pitching with a torn flexor tendon in his pitching arm, resulting in season-ending surgery.

Varvaro re-signed with the Red Sox prior to last season, totaling a 2.83 ERA in 18 relief appearances for the PawSox. But on June 19 he announced he was retiring from professional baseball to pursue a career in law enforcement.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Sam Kennedy sits down with Mustard and Johnson to talk about the big off season for the Red Sox so far.

[0:00:05] ... More extra festivities. More celebration the year this year. For the first Curt Schilling showed up to 2003 Christmas it that way. Back to 600 while they are. Very excited UN. Dave and everybody else put ...
[0:08:37] ... well because we were the ones that we're insisted. On celebrating OK David Ortiz and appropriately recognize him. So much. I don't think so I really thought the guys in the clubhouse Sunday. We screwed up ...
[0:09:11] ... awkward. Middle of the tough stretch. And then I think anyone. Really Cleveland Indians credit rate is area Francona well I've been a real one I mean let's let's go back to the end of the ...
[0:12:20] ... a long time. Probably no more owners or. Two. He you know Mark Sweeney mark it and be all. I feel lucky to worked to this organization for fifty years for me it start you know ...






Trenni and Tomase sit down with John Farrell and talk to him about the trades and free agent signings that took place at the MLB winter meetings. They also talk about Pablo Sandoval, how his training is going in Florida and what to expect from him this upcoming year.

[0:00:00] ... Joining us now is manager John Farrell and Donna that Dominique give you the same honor that they gave today Doug Ross can't talk to you enough. The last ...
[0:01:34] ... accomplish after not one of his best years do you look at David Wright should be okay it takes some guys in here to sort of just what it's like here. Do you expect the same ...
[0:02:26] ... for herself this the first time he's been in another uniform besides Chicago White Sox. And for any player regardless of stage career that there's going to be it's going to be different so there's going to ...
[0:09:24] ... but you know we've seen it happen before. Go to the resurrection John Lackey went through a while here it can happen. Hanley bounces back with a big year this year so I think if he ...






Now we know where the Red Sox were drawing the line when it came to trading for Chris Sale.

Rafael Devers

Rafael Devers

Now we know where the Red Sox were drawing the line when it came to trading for Chris Sale.

According a major league source, the player the White Sox were asking for in addition to Yoan Moncada and Michael Kopech was third base prospect Rafael Devers. It wasn’t until Devers was taken out of the equation by the White Sox that a deal for Sale was completed, with Luis Alexander Basabe and Victor Diaz ultimately going to Chicago in the deal.

It wasn’t the first time the White Sox had asked for Devers, with the 20-year-old’s name first surfaced in a potential Sale deal just before the non-waiver trade deadline. A source confirms that major league talent was also asked for by Chicago during July negotiations, which wasn’t the case this offseason.

With Moncada gone, Devers becomes an even more vital part of the Red Sox’ future, with little depth behind current third baseman Pablo Sandoval.

After a slow start with Single-A Salem last season, Devers finished strong. The lefty hitter managed a .326 batting average with seven home runs and .906 OPS after the All-Star break, finishing hitting .282 with a .779 and 11 homers in 128 games.

The Red Sox also have another power-hitting third baseman in their system with Bobby Dalbec, who was a fourth-round pick out of the University of Arizona in last year’s draft. The righty-hitting Dalbec tore up the New York-Penn League during his pro debut, hitting .386 with a 1.101 OPS and seven homers in 34 games with short-season Lowell.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford