Rusney Castillo

Rusney Castillo

Rusney Castillo evidently sees the importance of the upcoming season.

According to a source familiar with the situation, the 29-year-old is slated start playing in the Puerto Rican Winter League starting Dec. 8, with the plan to participate until the completion of the schedule in early January.

Castillo has spent some time playing for Caguas in Puerto Rico in each of the past two offseasons, but never played for this length of time.

The outfielder is hoping to reverse the trend of a major league career that continues to flounder, with four years, $46 million still left on his contract. Castillo’s stay with the Red Sox hit a low point last season when the organization took him off the 40-man roster.

In 103 games for Triple-A Pawtucket last season, Castillo hit .263 with a .664 OPS, two home runs and nine stolen bases. Despite making the Opening Day roster, he only played in nine games for the Red Sox, going 2-for-8.

Castillo did show some signs of life once moved to the leadoff spot with the PawSox, hitting .287 with a .725 OPS. He also managed a .351 batting average and an .897 OPS in August.

Playing in parts of three seasons since signing his seven-year, $72.5 million contract, Castillo has hit .262 with a .679 OPS in 99 games, striking out 63 times and drawing just 16 walks.

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Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Mike Lowell made no bones about it 10 years ago when his words regarding Cuban dictator Fidel Castro were splashed across the front page of the Boston Herald: ‘I hope he dies’.

CLICK BELOW TO LISTEN BRADFO SHOW PODCAST WITH MIKE LOWELL

DieCstroMike Lowell made no bones about it 10 years ago when his words regarding Cuban dictator Fidel Castro were splashed across the front page of the Boston Herald: ‘I hope he dies’.

Now Castro is dead, passing away at the age of 90 years old late Friday night. And as the former Red Sox’ third baseman explained on the Bradfo Show podcast, his opinion of the Cuban revolutionary hasn’t changed one bit.

“I don’t think anyone should wish death on someone, but to live in this country and you’re hopeful Osama Bin Laden dies prior to him being killed. I would say probably 99 percent reaction would be, yes. It’s been said that Fidel Castro to the Cubans is Adolf Hitler to the Jews, is Osama Bin Laden to this country. That’s kind of the correlation,” Lowell said

“They had people who politically whose ideals were against Castro and they would put the mom and the dad in the middle of a circle and make the kids watch as they parade around them and then put a bullet in their heads. Now that’s savagery.

“I’m not sad he’s dead. Move on and if this helps change that regime, their thought process or something, it’s better for the Cuban people. I think everybody should pursue what they want to make them happy. That’s basically the bottom line. I don’t think a country should have a say in what you want to make out of your life.”

The angst Lowell and his family has toward Castro is deep-rooted in family members who were killed during the dictator’s regime, and the suffering that was inflicted prior to the opportunity for his parents, and his wife’s parents, to escape Cuba.

One example of the direct impact of Castro on Lowell’s family came in the form of an incident involving his wife’s father, who was jailed for 15 years as a political prisoner after not supporting the regime.

It’s all why Lowell has no problem suggesting the hatred for Castro for some Cubans is comparable to the vitriol involving Hitler and Bin Laden.

“Some would put Castro above Hitler, and why? Because they’re not Jewish. It’s what you relate to. It’s what hits home a little bit more,” Lowell said. “I’m not saying Castro is worse than Hitler, or Hitler is worse than Castro. I don’t want to get into the atrocities of Hitler because that’s possibly the abomination of the world as a human being. But I think Cubans view that as someone who is trying to eliminate everyone who was against what he thought, and he did it to his own Cuban people. If you told me it was a country of people coming in to take over your country, I understand. But it was within your own country. I think that’s a much more damaging and a much more savage way to go about things.”

Needless to say, the reaction to Castro’s death in the Lowell family was a strong one.

“I think it was more a lot of talk around my family where people wanted to out-live him. Almost to the fact that he didn’t get us,” he said. “Speaking to my parents, I really wish my grandparents, all four of them, were alive so they could say, ‘We outlasted this guy.’ That was a big deal. And to the generation that was younger I think they feel that maybe we were right in our sacrifice in leaving and rooting for something that is going to be better. Maybe we’ll stick around to be able to see it. I don’t think it was this party in the street type of thing, definitely not in my house. But I woke up my kids earlier and said, ‘Anthony, just to let you know, Fidel Castro died last night.’ His reaction, ‘We have to call my wife’s dad.’ Even at 12 years old, I don’t think he knows the details of his grandpa, but he knows he was in prison and it’s not like he committed a crime.

“It was news, but maybe just a step in the right direction that it’s maybe one less rung on the ladder to get things going in the right direction for the people of that country. You feel for them because that is the fiber of what I grew up with. That was my culture growing up. I’m the Americanized Latino. I have all the benefits of the United States with Cuban values and background, so I feel I’m doubly privileged in that sense. I got the taste of what it was like, but I got the freedoms of what they are hopeful for.”

When reacting to Castro’s death, there has been some who have pointed out some of the favorable elements in Cuba’s current society, such as education and health care. But, as Lowell pointed out, even that dialogue should be carefully dispersed.

“Literacy, health care. It’s great how good it is. But nobody jumps on a raft not knowing whether you’re going to make it or basically is going to die on the ocean if things are that good,” Lowell said. “It even got the point with Venezuela, and Bolivia, where Cuba was sending all their doctors, engineers and all their professional people who could give brain power over to them for discounted oil. Why? Because the country needed oil to survive. That’s what we’re going to send over, all of the people that take care of society? Are their good doctors and good professionals? I’m sure there are very good doctors in Cuba and accountants and all that. But for the greater good, what I don’t like is that if you want to be a baker, you don’t have the freedom to be a baker. You want to be a trash collector, you don’t have the freedom to be a trash collector. You don’t have the freedom to be what you’re passionate about, and that’s where I think they rip your soul out because you might be someone who works a job but your passion is something else and you don’t have the freedom to pursue that. You take away that, you take away the family aspect and you take away what you want to be passionate about, there’s no incentive to do anything good with your life. I think that’s the deterioration of the whole society. That’s why they’re an economic failure, because you don’t allow the people to pursue what they want. That freedom doesn’t exist. Not that we take it for granted here in the United States, but we realize how easily you can do whatever you want to do.

“What I got from talking even (recently-deceased Cuban pitcher) Jose Fernandez, guys like that, what level of desperation must you be at to find that that is a good alternative and a good choice for your life. And that’s where I say what would it take … I boat a lot here in Miami and it gets rough and I have a boat with an engine I hope more often than not works. To get on something like that with your family members and water and say, ‘Well, we have enough for three days.’ What happens when you hit Day 4 and Day 5 and you’re out there and the sun is beating down and doesn’t stop. That’s when I say, ‘What level of desperation must I be at to say I’m going to do this.’ Everybody’s level is different, but it can’t be good. There is never a level where you’re like, ‘It’s not that bad, but I’m going to jump on the raft.’ When you see that happening, you know there is something wrong with the system.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Rob Bradford is joined by former Red Sox third baseman, Mike Lowell, to discuss the death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. Lowell explains where his family's hatred toward Castro comes from, viewing the polarizing figure as the equivalent of Adolf Hitler in many respects. Lowell also reflects on the Boston Herald headline quoting him as saying, "I hope he dies," and why he has no regrets taking that stance 10 years ago.

[0:00:32] ... is the day I believe that David the the actual day that Fidel Castro died. I and obviously is a lot of ties with the Mike with Fidel Castro. We've gone through some of them in the past. But my biggest what I was start off why I should start off ...
[0:01:33] ... going back to win. You out to meet you framed a certain Boston herald's. Up front page right. It. My father and all bad basically what he called it broke. Editorial retire about that a little bit and just took for clarification back cover of the Boston Herald. Was I hope he dies in that was in regards to obviously one Fidel Castro so so Mike I wanna go back. Did to sort of what people know what the history is what your family. In ...
[0:08:34] ... to you is how I formed a lot of my opinion both Fidel Castro. And and how I've done more research on. But for you would your family are especially that you won with the first ...
[0:21:33] ... Red Sox and you're. Approached I deeply believe like Jeff organ the Boston Herald. And asked about it and you said you know the quote was I hope he dies. What's which as as as all the the members of the Boston Herald news room celebrated because they had a great Atlanta put on the front paper. But I figured that might have been sort ...






Rob Bradford is joined by former Red Sox third baseman, Mike Lowell, to discuss the death of Cuban dictator, Fidel Castro. Lowell explains where his family's hatred toward Castro comes from, viewing the polarizing figures as the equivalent of Adolf Hitler in many respects. Lowell also reflects on the Boston Herald quoting him as saying, "I hope he dies" and why he has no regrets taking that stance 10 years ago.

[0:00:42] ... is the day I believe that David the the actual day that Fidel Castro died. I and obviously there's a lot of ties with the Mike with Fidel Castro. We've gone through some of them in the past. But my biggest what I was start off why I should start off ...
[0:02:11] ... I hope he dies in that was in regards to obviously one Fidel Castro so so Mike I wanna go back. Did to sort of let people know what their history is what your family. In ...
[0:08:44] ... is how I've formed a lot of in my opinion both the Fidel Castro. And and how I've done more research on. But for you would your family are especially review one was the first time ...
[0:15:15] ... me a legit QB. It's basic talking to. Yeah I think get fed cup basically it was a it bit. You ...






Sean O’Sullivan started four games with the Red Sox in 2016. Now it’s on to South Korea.

Sean O'Sullivan

Sean O’Sullivan

Sean O’Sullivan started four games with the Red Sox in 2016. Now it’s on to South Korea.

The 29-year-old, who spent all last season with Triple-A Pawtucket and the Red Sox after signing a minor-league deal with the organization last offseason, has agreed to play for Nexen Heroes of the Korea Baseball Organization. According to Dan Kurtz of MyKBO.net, O’Sullivan will be making $1.1 million for the 2016 season.

The Red Sox won all four of O’Sullivan’s starts, with the righty getting 39 runs of support in those appearances. His best start came against the Angels at Fenway Park July 3, the day after the Sox had suffered an embarrassing, 21-2 defeat at the hands of Los Angeles. In that outing he only surrendered two runs and four hits over five innings.

He would land on the major league 15-day disabled list (left knee tendonitis) July 9, making room on the roster for reliever Brad Ziegler. The righty came back to make eight starts for Triple-A Pawtucket. With the PawSox, O’Sullivan went 9-6 with a 4.02 ERA in 19 starts.

In his five big league appearances, O’Sullivan totaled a 6.75 ERA in 21 1/3 innings. He has appeared in 71 major league games with five teams, making 56 starts.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Red Sox pitcher Steven Wright joins the Hot Stove Show to talk about the health of the shoulder that kept him out of a lot of the second-half of the season and the rehab process he's going through. He also tells of the origin of his Twitter handle.

[0:00:02] ... watney rob Bradford Johnson mossy along with you we're joined now by Red Sox pitchers Stephen right. Even happy at Thanksgiving I don't. You're. Strong. Like everybody else is the way you'd drive into Lyon he ...
[0:04:33] ... some conversations about trying to avoid work stoppage or a lockout a Major League Baseball how much attention have you paid to that in in what's your reaction to. Sort of what's been going on with with ...
[0:09:11] ... he won he said the he wasn't intending to pitch in the World Baseball Classic. Are about because your injury you probably don't want to put yourself in that position. But if you're ever asked would you ...
[0:10:24] ... I'll tell you out of honored as other opportunity AL 00. Our Red Sox pitcher Stephen Wright we appreciate you had taken the time where you don't was asked his panoramic of from Hawaii for David ...






Jayson joins the guys to talk about the ongoing talks between MLB and the MLBPA as they attempt to avoid a lockout in baseball.

[0:00:52] ... the course these last few weeks there even is labor strife in Major League Baseball. I mean I think that. You're right because you go back to the GM meetings couple weeks ago and rob Manfred the commissioner baseball stood up in front of everyone said. Where at the five yard line and when you're at the five yard line in labor negotiations and you governor a whole lot about it like is gonna get done. And he basically said he thought I was gonna he had gone and then obviously last Knightley was Ken Rosenthal. Reported that it way is it that that it was on the table. Generally know what that means it's. Lockouts on the ...
[0:02:45] ... knew what was gonna happen if we got a December 1 as Ken Rosenthal reported what was gonna happen was it owner for going to impose a lockout and it's great to me that that turn ...
[0:13:03] ... boring. Have all that all men and the Cubs does win the World Series. And what place like Cleveland to get a load on an international draft. He had a place like Cleveland which you've fought ...
[0:13:42] ... sides here represented by the Donald fears of the world. Play I Tony Clark seems seems to me and we know he wind when he was with the Red Sox and on that terrible terrible team ...






The guys talk with Red Sox pitcher Steven Wright about his injured shoulder that kept him out of most of the second half of the season, and they also talk about the pace of play in Major League Baseball.

[0:16:55] ... Batista. They've also likely spoke to the representative at. Of the starters Rich Hill and Jason Hammel. This is all that but. I awesome I signed fourteen people yes yes. A dream. It's the you've drawn ...
[0:22:26] ... that man and handle it out it didn't work out very tired Joel Hanrahan give me example that Warrick. Koji was a free agent. That your traditional Kelly yeah it in. By it but it is ...
[0:26:21] ... on like. You know at the beginning of the 2013. Run Alvin Craig Breslow was probably viewed as he was the American League Championship Series. But he went on this run but it it's. It is ...