According to a major league source, David Ross has agreed to a two-year, $5 million deal with the Cubs.

The 37 year old had narrowed his decision down to the Red Sox, Padres and Cubs prior to Friday. The Red Sox, however, appear to be on the verge of acquiring Ryan Hanigan from San Diego for third baseman Will Middlebrooks.

With the choice coming down to the Padres and Cubs, Ross made the move to join his former teammate Jon Lester in Chicago.

Ross battled various injuries during his two-year stint with the Red Sox, including concussions. He played in a combined 86 regular season games with the Sox, thriving during the team’s 2013 postseason run when the backstop took over starting duties for the final two rounds.

Ken Rosenthal of FoxSports.com was first to report the agreement.

The Cubs and Red Sox seemingly have at least one more free agent showdown, with another major league source suggesting reliever Craig Breslow has narrowed his decision down to the two teams. The Red Sox declined their $4 million option on the lefty earlier this offseason.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

New Red Sox pitcher Wade Miley checked in with Rob Bradford, Alex Speier and Mike Mutnansky on Thursday’s Hot Stove show, and the left-hander clarified his view of the gluten controversy with his former team

According to a major league source, the Red Sox are on the verge of sending third baseman Will Middlebrooks to the Padres in exch

Wade Miley

Wade Miley

New Red Sox pitcher Wade Miley checked in with Rob Bradford, Alex Speier and Mike Mutnansky on Thursday’s Hot Stove show, and the left-hander clarified his view of the gluten controversy with his former team, the Diamondbacks. To hear the interview, go to the WEEI audio on demand page.

Miley said his initial comments about the Diamondbacks pushing him to eliminate gluten from his diet were overblown.

“I said something a little sarcastic and I guess it got taken a little further than it needed to be taken,” Miley said. “They did not require you to be gluten free. They would like you to be a little healthier than I would think, than I would expect, but no, they definitely don’t require you to be gluten free. They just really worry about your health a lot.”

Added Miley: “I’m a big fan of old-school guys. You can’t tell me Babe Ruth ever stopped eating gluten.”

Asked what food he was most hesitant to give up, Miley responded, “Fried chicken.”

The 6-foot-0, 220-pound Miley is known for his durability, as he’s pitched 200 innings each of the past two seasons, after going 194 innings in 2012. While his ERA climbed from 3.33 in 2013 to 4.34 last year, Miley said he was surprised that the Diamondbacks were ready to move him.

“I had heard about some of the rumors, but I really didn’t think much of them,” he said. “Those things happen. I guess Arizona’s in the rebuilding stage and whatever they’re trying to do. I was looking forward to going back to Arizona and trying to win there, and then bam, just like that, things just got a little heavy. And I really didn’t know what team it would be, but I talked to a few people and they said looks like I’m going to get traded. And then Boston hops in the picture and then it happened.

“It was kind of nuts, those three days. It was a little drawn out more than I thought it would be. I’ve never been traded, so I didn’t really know the process it would be. It was kind of stressful a little bit, but it all worked out for the best.”

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar

According to a major league source, the Red Sox are on the verge of sending third baseman Will Middlebrooks to the Padres in exchange for catcher Ryan Hanigan.

The deal appears to be contingent on Middlebrooks passing a physical with San Diego. The 26 year old recently said that he is still recovering from a wrist injury, although he didn’t view the ailment as an issue heading into 2015.

The Red Sox have previously expressed interested in Hanigan (an Andover native), targeting the 34 year old righty hitter to back up Christian Vazquez. Hanigan, who played with Tampa Bay in ’14 after spending his previous seven big league seasons with Cincinnati, had been traded to San Diego earlier this week.

Hanigan played in 84 games with the Rays in ’14, hitting .218 with five home runs. His career-high in games played came in ’12, totaling 112 appearances. He carries a career .256 batting average and .694 OPS.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

Former Red Sox pitcher and current Cubs pitcher Jon Lester joined the Hot Stove show Thursday night with Mike Mutnansky, Rob Bradford and Alex

Former Red Sox pitcher and current Cubs pitcher Jon Lester joined the Hot Stove Show Thursday night with Mike Mutnansky, Rob Bradford and Alex Speier to discuss what the free agent process was like, what the negotiations last spring training were like with the Red Sox, and also what it was like the hours and days following officially signing with the Cubs.

Lester signed with the Cubs for six years and $155 million, with a vesting option for a seventh year.

Everyone keeps coming back to the reported four-year/$70 million offer the Red Sox gave to Lester during spring training last season. What if the Red Sox came in with a higher offer — such as the Cliff Lee, 5-year/$120 million deal — would Lester have accepted?

“That is one of those deals where hindsight is 20/20. You go back in time and you look at it and you go probably yes,” said Lester. “I mean you don’t know. I mean it is one of those deals where when it is sitting in front of you that is a lot of money to just turn down. That would have made it very difficult to turn it down.”

Following spring training, Lester and his camp were under the impression the two sides would not discuss a contract during the season because that was what was agreed between them and the Red Sox, and they didn’t want any distractions for he and his teammates during the year.

“As far as I understood, and that is not coming from my agent, that is from what I understood coming out of everyone’s mouth was that once the season started, I think we had all agreed upon that and it wasn’t just one side saying we don’t negotiate during the season,” Lester said. “I think it was more a group discussion and a group decision that if we weren’t able to come to a conclusion with the contract negotiations before the season started we thought it was in the best interest of everybody to table it ’till the offseason and wait until the season is over and all the distractions of playing, the ups and downs of the season and all that to get after it again.

“Like I said the other day, I don’t know if that is a bad quality or a good quality, but I am kind of hard-headed when it comes to that. If we make a decision one way or the other, just like if we would have made the decision to continue talking I would have expected that to continue. I think we all kind of decided at that time with the distractions of everything going on it wasn’t the right time or place to continue the discussions.”

Following are more highlights from the interview. For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

On why he took to Twitter the day after the announcement, responding to positive and negative tweets: “It was tough. It was one of those deals we felt like we needed to do. I sat down with my wife and a couple of my buddies and anytime we got an off the wall tweet from somebody we all stepped back and took a breather — obviously not respond too fast and get ourselves in trouble and say something that we want to say, but we can’t.

“For me the best part about it was the welcoming of the new fans, the new city and the new home and obviously saying the good byes to the people we needed to. That to me was truly special and something that I will always remember — the people who truly support me and my family no matter what uniform I put on really meant a lot to me. That is why we felt like we needed to do, get out there and show these people their voices really were heard and that they are appreciated.”

On what he did the days leading up to the decision and how hard it was to escape: “I know on Sunday night I went down and saw a buddy of mine in South Georgia and got away that night and did a duck hunt on Monday morning, and stopped by my farm Monday afternoon and sat in the deer stand. It is one of those deals where you are sitting in the deer stand and getting text after text after text from people, ‘Hey where are you going? When are you deciding? Hey, what is going on? What’s the deal?’ so forth and so on. It’s one of those deals where no matter what you try and do you can’t fully get away from it till it’s done. Obviously this last week has been a whirlwind tour for us as well. It’s been a long week and turning around this week and then you have Christmas the following week so these next couple of weeks are hectic for us, but I wouldn’t complain one bit.”

On the phone calls to former Red Sox teammates once making decision: “That whole night wasn’t easy. The whole plan behind everything was to not tell anybody. We weren’t even going to tell our families when we made the decision and try and make it through the physical and then tell everyone once we passed the physical, to make sure everything went well. We didn’t want to say we signed for whatever with this team and then two days later something happen and you’re back down to nothing. We tried to go that route, but obviously I got a text shortly thereafter we made the decision saying that it was going to get out so I started making phone calls.

“Ben Cherington was number one and then Dustin Pedroia was number two shortly thereafter. After that it snowballed from there. I was calling around to guys that played a big part in my life and my career, even if they were there for a year, or a year and in half in [Shane] Victorino and [Mike] Napoli. Obviously guys like David Ortiz, I wanted these guys to hear it from me and not some tweet or not some report on MLB or anything like that. I had to make sure that they heard it from my voice and I hope they appreciated that. It was a hard night and after all those very difficult phone calls I got a pretty cool one from Theo [Epstein] and Joe Maddon and Jed Hoyer shortly thereafter. Tough night followed by a big celebration after that.”

 

 

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Former Red Sox pitcher and current Cubs pitcher Jon Lester joined the Hot Stove show Thursday night with Mike Mutnansky, Rob Bradford and Alex Speier to discuss what the free agent process was like, what the negotiations last spring training were like with the Red Sox, and also what it was like the hours and days following officially signing with the Cubs.

Lester signed with the Cubs for six years and $155 million, with a vesting option for a seventh year.

Everyone keeps coming back to the reported 4-year/$70 million offer the Red Sox gave to Lester during spring training last season. What if the Red Sox came in with a higher offer — such as the Cliff Lee, 5-year/$120 million deal — would Lester have accepted?

“That is one of those deals where hindsight is 20/20. You go back in time and you look at it and you go probably yes,” said Lester. “I mean you don’t know. I mean it is one of those deals where when it is sitting in front of you that is a lot of money to turn down. That would have made it very difficult to turn it down.”

Following spring training, Lester and his camp were under the impression the two sides would not discuss a contract during the season because that was what was agreed between them and the Red Sox, and they didn’t want any distractions for he and his teammates during the year.

“As far as I understood, and that is not coming from my agent, that is from what I understood coming out of everyone’s mouth was that once the season started, I think we had all agreed upon that and it wasn’t just one side saying we don’t negotiate during the season,” Lester said. “I think it was more a group discussion and a group decision that if we weren’t able to come to a conclusion with the contract negotiations before the season started we thought it was in the best interest of everybody to table it ’till the offseason and wait until the season is over and all the distractions of playing, the ups and downs of the season and all that to get after it again.

“Like I said the other day, I don’t know if that is a bad quality or a good quality, but I am kind of hard-headed when it comes to that. If we make a decision one way or the other, just like if we would have made the decision to continue talking I would have expected that to continue. I think we all kind of decided at that time with the distractions of everything going on it wasn’t the right time or place to continue the discussions.”

Following are more highlights from the interview. For more Red Sox news, visit weei.com/redsox.

On why he took to Twitter the day after the announcement, responding to positive and negative tweets: “It was tough. It was one of those deals we felt like we needed to do. I sat down with my wife and a couple of my buddies and anytime we got an off the wall tweet from somebody we all stepped back and took a breather — obviously not respond too fast and get ourselves in trouble and say something that we want to say, but we can’t.

“For me the best part about it was the welcoming of the new fans, the new city and the new home and obviously saying the good byes to the people we needed to. That to me was truly special and something that I will always remember — the people who truly support me and my family no matter what uniform I put on really meant a lot to me. That is why we felt like we needed to do, get out there and show these people their voices really were heard and that they are appreciated.”

On what he did the days leading up to the decision and how hard it was to escape: “I know on Sunday night I went down and saw a buddy of mine in South Georgia and got away that night and did a duck hunt on Monday morning, and stopped by my farm Monday afternoon and sat in the deer stand. It is one of those deals where you are sitting in the deer stand and getting text after text after text from people, ‘Hey where are you going? When are you deciding? Hey, what is going on? What’s the deal?’ so forth and so on. It’s one of those deals where no matter what you try and do you can’t fully get away from it till it’s done. Obviously this last week has been a whirlwind tour for us as well. It’s been a long week and turning around this week and then you have Christmas the following week so these next couple of weeks are hectic for us, but I wouldn’t complain one bit.”

On the phone calls to former Red Sox teammates once making decision: “That whole night wasn’t easy. The whole plan behind everything was to not tell anybody. We weren’t even going to tell our families when we made the decision and try and make it through the physical and then tell everyone once we passed the physical, to make sure everything went well. We didn’t want to say we signed for whatever with this team and then two days later something happen and you’re back down to nothing. We tried to go that route, but obviously I got a text shortly thereafter we made the decision saying that it was going to get out so I started making phone calls.

“Ben Cherington was number one and then Dustin Pedroia was number two shortly thereafter. After that it snowballed from there. I was calling around to guys that played a big part in my life and my career, even if they were there for a year, or a year and in half in [Shane] Victorino and [Mike] Napoli. Obviously guys like David Ortiz, I wanted these guys to hear it from me and not some tweet or not some report on MLB or anything like that. I had to make sure that they heard it from my voice and I hope they appreciated that. It was a hard night and after all those very difficult phone calls I got a pretty cool one from Theo [Epstein] and Joe Maddon and Jed Hoyer shortly thereafter. Tough night followed by a big celebration after that.”

 

 

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Mut, Rob, and Alex talk with former Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester. Jon talks about his experiences with free agency, what it would have taken to sign him to the Red Sox last season, and his experiences with fans since signing with the Cubs.

[0:00:00] ... Andy for Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester nine member of the Chicago Cubs joins us here on the AT&T hotline part of the hot stove show a job it's like rob and Alex your Boston ...
[0:06:00] ... comfortable that our. We're talking to Kirk cub and former red sock Jon Lester and John Q&A talk show here every night in Boston in it. Most fans keep coming back to last spring training and ...
[0:14:04] ... You know you go back in time and you look at a new book probably yes but I. I mean I don't know I mean it's one of those deals where when it sitting consortium that ...
[0:16:07] ... the end of the day we felt like. You know that the Chicago Cubs were or that decision and you know like I said the mean. You get kind of have an idea where returned that ...






Mut, Rob, and Alex talk with newly signed Red Sox pitcher, Wade Miley. They talk about the story that came out about the D-Backs wanting him to switch to a gluten-free diet, and what he expects coming from the N.L. West to the A.L. East.

[0:00:17] ... five years I thought I returned jobs are those that that was Jon Lester area the headline on Yahoo! Sports earlier this week was. To meet bananas and that was that the Arizona Diamondbacks wade. Wanted you in the rest of the team to go gluten free and that was part of their plan and that ...
[0:01:37] ... How much did you look at it do you look at what Brandon McCarthy was able to accomplish in making that same transition obviously. You know he was he was tremendous for the Yankees last year ...
[0:02:21] ... yours skill set and pitching at Fenway Park and everything else week Craig Breslow was out. At the winner meetings and you were former teammate of him and when that deal went down eight. And one ...
[0:03:50] ... mind a lot of pictures view the American League east of Tibet Jon Lester when we were going through the merits of Jon Lester was he pitched the American League east so long. And and that was equality and a lot of pitchers can undertake. What ...