Joe Castiglione & Lou Merloni talked to the Sox outfielder, who had three hits and threw out a runner at home in the win over the Yankees.

[0:00:01] ... This when they could have gotten away so many times in the Red Sox made it big plays with a double plays when they have to and then of course the last stop but that. Tell us about the ball. I'm with a bases loaded in the fourth inning that else Berry hit the double play that resulted. Yeah he hit the ball really well. Not kind ...
[0:01:12] ... the outfield much ground you can call birdies they put Jackie in left field this. There's almost a waste of what he can do within nights like tonight you realize what a powerful hormone felt there ...
[0:02:14] ... of perseverance and it's easily grinding and working hard. Now when the ground ball was hit the first with bird did you think he was gonna come home when you were on third bomb. No I ...





Joe Castiglione & Lou Merloni talked to the Sox outfielder, who had three hits and threw out a runner at home in the win over the Yankees.

[0:00:00] ... congratulations history when they could've gotten away so many times in the Red Sox made the big plays with a double plays when they have to and then of course the last stop but that. Tell us about the ball. I'm with the bases loaded in the fourth inning that else Berry hit the double play that resulted. Yeah he hit the ball really well. Not Donovan ...
[0:01:12] ... outfield how much ground you can call birdies they put Jackie in left field this. There's almost a waste of what he can do within nights like tonight you realize what a powerful almost felt there ...
[0:02:14] ... of perseverance and it's usually grinding and working hard. Now when the ground ball was hit the first with Bert did you think he was gonna come home when you were on third mum. No I ...





Jackie Bradley (right) celebrates with interim manager Torey Lovullo after scoring Monday. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Jackie Bradley (right) celebrates with interim manager Torey Lovullo after scoring Monday. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

With the season over from a standings perspective, the Red Sox are left with three reasons to play out the schedule ‘€“ seeing how young players develop, determining who should be here in 2016, and watching David Ortiz‘s chase for 500 home runs.

Monday night’s 4-3 victory over the Yankees hit on all three categories.

Youngsters Mookie Betts (2-run homer), Jackie Bradley (3 hits, runner thrown out at plate), and even starter Eduardo Rodriguez (5-plus 2-run innings despite subpar command) gave the Red Sox something to feel good about for the present and future. Beleaguered reliever Junichi Tazawa started a beautiful 1-6-3 double play to end the eighth. And Ortiz blasted career homer No. 495.

Add it all together, and not a bad night for a team going nowhere.

Let’s actually start with Ortiz. Forget about 500. At this rate, three years from now we’re going to be talking about homer No. 600.

Continuing a second-half surge that has restored his place among the most feared sluggers in the game, Ortiz’s solo homer to left proved the winner and left him just five long balls shy of becoming the 27th player in history to reach 500. His 29th homer of 2015 also left him one shy of his ninth 30-homer season, which would break a tie with Ted Williams for most in Red Sox history.

Ortiz’s homer made a winner of Rodriguez, who was lifted after allowing a leadoff single in the sixth. He allowed seven hits and three walks in his five innings, but he continually managed to avoid massive innings.

It helps that he erased one run at the plate on a comebacker, and that Bradley cut down another with yet another tremendous throw, this time from left field on a would-be sacrifice fly to erase Greg Bird at home.

The Yankees struck quickly in the first, with Jacoby Ellsbury reaching on catcher’s interference and Chris Young getting aboard on a Pablo Sandoval error. An Alex Rodriguez single and Carlos Beltran single had the Yankees positioned for a big inning, but Rodriguez limited the damage to one run by popping out Brian McCann and striking out Chase Headley.

The Red Sox took the lead in the third on Betts’ two-run homer into the Monster seats, scoring Bradley, but the Yankees answered right back in the top of the fourth with a run of their own. It could’ve been worse, since the Yankees opened the frame with a walk and three straight singles, but Rodriguez and Bradley erased runs at the plate.

That set the stage for Ortiz, who went the other way and just snuck a home run into the first row of Monster seats. Within seconds, someone had flipped the nearby flags marking his career homers from No. 494 to 495, and it was officially a good night at Fenway.

That didn’t mean it ended cleanly. Closer Jean Machi walked in a run in the ninth before striking out Greg Bird and getting Didi Gregorius to fly to the fence in right to end it.

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

Hanley Ramirez isn’t the only former shortstop trying to transition to first base.

Contributor Erin Lashley was at JetBlue Park for Game 1 of the best-of-three Florida Gulf Coast League championship between the Red Sox and Blue Jays with the Red Sox taking Game 1, 3-2. Red Sox 2015 eighth-round pick Logan Allen started the game and went four innings, allowing two runs to pick up a no-decision.

Below are videos from the start. To read more about Allen, check out last week’s Red Sox minor league notebook.

Blog Author: 
WEEI

Hanley Ramirez isn’t the only former shortstop trying to transition to first base. Across the field in the Yankees dugout, Alex Rodriguez is doing the same thing, and he wants to make something abundantly clear: it’s not easy.

Rodriguez has played two games at first in his 21-year career and started exactly one ‘€“ on April 11 this season against the Red Sox following a marathon 19-inning loss. Rodriguez booted a Mike Napoli grounder for an error and looked remarkably uncomfortable for a two-time Gold Glover at short.

“It felt uncomfortable,” Rodriguez said on Monday before the Sox and Yankees opened a three-game series. “I thought I was terrible at it. I had one of the ugliest games I’ve seen. Like I told some of you guys, this is a lot more challenging than people give it credit for.”

Rodriguez is in a different place in his career than Ramirez. He just turned 40, has spent the entire season at designated hitter, and is coming off a 2014 season that he missed to suspension. The risk of injury weighs more heavily on him.

“Honestly, your guess is as good as mine, because I’ve never had to do this before,” Rodriguez said when asked about getting hurt. “I wish I had some experience on it, but I don’t. My guess is as good as yours.”

Yankees manager Joe Girardi, who has loaned Rodriguez a mitt, said Rodriguez might play first during this series. The Yankees are scrambling to fill the position with starter Mark Teixeira injured and rookie  Greg Bird inexperienced.

Rodriguez doesn’t want to cost the team a game in a pennant race.

“No question,” he said. “The stakes are much higher. The risk-reward ‘€¦ spring training is one thing. Even earlier in the season, you take April and May, it can be kind of a more trial-by-error kind of thing. It’s kind of a different story now.”

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

Interim Red Sox manager Torey Lovullo said he would feel comfortable playing Hanley Ramirez in a game at first base if his health was up to par.

Now Ramirez and the Red Sox have to figure out if his body will cooperate.

Interim Red Sox manager Torey Lovullo said he would feel comfortable playing Hanley Ramirez in a game at first base if his health was up to par.

Now Ramirez and the Red Sox have to figure out if his body will cooperate.

Ramirez, who took grounders at first base for the fourth time in six days, was slated to have his injured right shoulder looked at by the Red Sox medical staff. The righty hitter explained that the injury had been bothering him for a while after making a throw more than a month ago. It then cropped up again during the team’s recent homestand.

“I made one throw here at home. I don’t remember what month it was. And I hurt something but I played through it,” Ramirez said. “And then it happened again last homestand here. Since then it wasn’t feeling right and I was playing through it. But it got to the point where I took it to the manager and the trainer and they understood and they didn’t want me to go out there if I wasn’t 100 percent. That’s what we’ve been dealing with right now. I’ve just been waiting to get back to Boston to get it checked out with a doctor.”

He added, “I was missing some pitches I normally don’t miss. But I didn’t say anything until the last game in Detroit. This is not me. I’m such a good hitter and I can’t look like that on the field. But I didn’t want to say anything because I wanted to play.”

Ramirez, who first dealt with left shoulder injury in May, said that the injury had primarily led him to his struggles at the plate was the lingering hand ailment. His left hand remains swollen, having been hit by a line-drive on June 24.

Since returning from the injury Ramirez has hit .193 with four homers and a .556 OPS. He hasn’t hit a home run since July 11.

“Since that happened nothing has been the same,” he said. “You can see my hand, it’s still not the same. I don’t have the same grip that I had the first month. Some things happens that you can’t control, like being hit by a line-drive. That can happen, what? One out of a 100. Without me we’ve been playing great and that’s the thing that makes me feel a little bit comfortable, when you see your team winning series even we’re not in the lineup. That makes you feel better even a little bit.”

Asked if he harbored any frustration that the public was unaware of his physical limitations during his recent struggles, Ramrirez suggested as long as the organization understood that was the priority.

“They don’t know those little things. My teammates know. The team. So that’s the difference,” Ramirez noted. “You can control what you can control. They don’t know what’s going on in here, what’s going on with my body. I respect that because they pay to see you prove every day that you’re there. They want us to do the best every day. I know I’ve tried my best every day when I’ve been out there, but some things don’t’ go the right way.”

As for playing first base, Lovullo said all was going well in the player’s workouts with coach Brian Butterfield.

“Based on the health component, if that’s put aside, I’ve seen enough to say he probably could play first base before the year is over,” Lovullo said. “Now, I don’t want to trap him by saying that. That’s just my opinion, from what I’ve seen. It’ll be a collective effort to make sure it’s the right time.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

A look at the action in the Red Sox farm system on Sunday:

A look at the action in the Red Sox farm system on Sunday:

Shawn Haviland

Shawn Haviland

TRIPLE-A PAWTUCKET RED SOX (54-82): L, 7-0, at Rochester (Twins)

— Starting right-hander Shawn Haviland suffered the loss Sunday after allowing five runs — four earned — on nine hits and three walks over five innings of work. He also struck out three. Haviland fell to 5-9 and now has a 4.30 ERA.

— Righty Keith Couch relieved Haviland in the sixth inning and allowed two earned runs on two hits and two walks with two strikeouts. Couch has made four relief appearances and 21 starts for Pawtucket this season and is 4-10 with a 6.29 ERA.

— Right-hander Ryan Cook tossed a perfect eighth inning for the PawSox. Cook has pitched 9 1/3 innings over seven games in a Pawtucket uniform and has yet to allow a run.

— The Pawtucket offense was held to just five hits, as shortstop Deven Marrero, second baseman Marco Hernandez, designated hitter Carlos Rivero, third baseman Mike Miller and first baseman Matt Spring all singled.

Oscar Tejeda

Oscar Tejeda

DOUBLE-A PORTLAND SEA DOGS (49-85): L, 7-5 (15 innings), at New Britain (Rockies)

— Oscar Tejeda, who has played the majority of his games at third base this season, came in to pitch for the Sea Dogs in the bottom of the 14th inning. After loading the bases in the 14th, the righty escaped the frame unscathed, but he gave up a walkoff, two-run home run in the bottom of the 15th.

— Left-hander Danny Rosenbaum started for Portland and allowed three runs (two earned)€” on five hits and two walks with three strikeouts over five innings. Righty Mike Augliera tossed two scoreless innings of relief before lefty Williams Jerez gave up the tying run in the eighth inning.

— After Jerez pitched a scoreless ninth, right-hander Heri Quevedo came on for extras and went four innings. He gave up the tying run in the bottom of the 11th after Portland took a one-run lead in the top half of the frame. Quevedo finished with five hits, two walks and two strikeouts.

— First baseman Sam Travis led the Portland offense, going 2-for-7 with a two-run home run and three RBIs. Third baseman Dustin Lawley went 3-for-6, and right fielder Aneury Tavarez went 2-for-6 with an RBI.

— Sunday marked Portland’€™s second-longest game of the season — the Sea Dogs played 16 innings on July 2.

Brandon Show

Brandon Show

HIGH-A SALEM RED SOX (60-72): L, 4-1, vs. Potomac (Nationals)

— Righty reliever Brandon Show took the loss, allowing three runs on five hits in three innings of relief. Show has pitched in 11 games for Salem this season and is 1-1 with one save and a 3.19 ERA.

— Right-hander Kyle Kraus made a spot start for the Red Sox and went six innings, giving up just one earned run on three hits and one walk with three strikeouts. Kraus has pitched in 13 games for Salem this season and is 1-2 with two saves and a 1.24 ERA.

— Second baseman Yoilan Cerse led the Salem offense with a 3-for-4 day. Catcher Jordan Procyshen went 2-for-4 with a double and a run scored, and right fielder Franklin Guzman went 2-for-4.

— Sunday’€™s game was the final home game of the season for the Sox, who went 31-38 at Lewis-Gale Field this year.

Andrew Benintendi

Andrew Benintendi

SINGLE-A GREENVILLE DRIVE (68-64): L, 4-3, at Rome (Braves)

— Center fielder Andrew Benintendi continued his success at the plate, going 2-for-5 with a double and an RBI. Benintendi is batting .341 with three home runs and 12 RBIs in 11 games in a Drive uniform. He has hit safely in his last five games and has recorded two hits in each of his last three.

— Third baseman Rafael Devers also posted a two-hit game for Greenville, going 2-for-5 with a run scored. Devers has hit safely in his last five games and is hitting .276 on the season.

— Right-hander Ben Taylor took the loss after giving up four unearned runs, four hits and one walk with three strikeouts over five innings of work. Taylor, who was the Red Sox’€™ seventh-round pick in this year’€™s draft, has started nine games for Greenville and has an 0-2 record and a 3.40 ERA.

— Righty Mario Alcantara pitched three scoreless innings of relief and allowed two hits and one walk. He also struck out three. The 22-year-old from the Dominican Republic has appeared in 34 games for the Drive this season and is 4-2 with three saves and a 3.68 ERA.

Enfember Martinez

Enfember Martinez

SHORT-SEASON SINGLE-A LOWELL SPINNERS (34-34): L, 10-5 (11 innings), vs. Hudson Valley (Rays)

— Enfember Martinez suffered the loss after giving up five runs in the top of the 11th inning. The 20-year-old right-hander allowed four hits and one walk with two strikeouts in two innings of relief. Martinez dropped to 3-3 on the season after 15 appearances. He now has a 3.60 ERA.

— Right-hander Kevin Steen started for the Spinners and was tagged for four earned runs on four hits and two walks in 3 1/3 innings. He recorded two strikeouts. Steen has started six games for the Spinners this year and is 0-1 with a 4.00 ERA.

— Left fielder Tyler Spoon drove in four of the Spinners’€™ five runs and finished the day 2-for-4 with a two-run home run (his first home run in a Spinners uniform), a double and a walk. The 22-year-old has played in nine games for Lowell this season and is hitting .243 with six RBIs.

— Shortstop Jeremy Rivera went 3-for-5 with a double and two runs scored. First baseman Tucker Tubbs also posted a multi-hit game for Lowell, going 2-for-5.

Blog Author: 
Emily McCarthy