Drew Pomeranz has no plans on drawing back on his innings this season. (Bob Mackson/USA Today Sports)ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Drew Pomeranz doesn't even want to entertain the idea of drawing back. No innings limits.



The Red Sox lost a game in horrible fashion, but that might not have been the worst takeaway from Wednesday’s 4-3 walk-off loss to the Rays.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With his backpack finally filled up and thrown over his shoulders, Andrew Benintendi started his long walk out of the visitors’ clubhouse Wednesday night. This time, however, it was a lot longer, and a lot more painful, than when he entered.

Andrew Benintendi

Andrew Benintendi

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With his backpack finally filled up and thrown over his shoulders, Andrew Benintendi started his long walk out of the visitors’ clubhouse Wednesday night. This time, however, it was a lot longer, and a lot more painful, than when he entered.

Benintendi exited the premises with a pronounced limp, putting as little weight on his left leg as possible. It was the best he could muster after spraining the knee while trying to get back to second base on a Dustin Pedroia ground ball in the seventh inning.

“Right now it’s just stiff,” he said. “I’m going to come back tomorrow and see how it feels.”

Benintendi and Red Sox manager John Farrell both reiterated that no conclusions can be drawn until they get the results of an MRI that is expected to be taken Thursday.

“He’s going to go through some testing [Thursday],” said Red Sox manager John Farrell, who was joined with two trainers in helping Benintendi off the field. “We’re trying to get an MRI scheduled here for Thursday morning. He changed direction on the base-running play and unfortunately he felt the left knee grab him. To what extent the injury is, we’ll hopefully know more by game-time [Thursday].”

“It was just one of those freak things you don’t plan on it to happen, but it’s one of those things,” said the outfielder, who didn’t even realize he had also twisted his ankle until watching the replay. “So we’re just going to see what the results say and move on from there.”

The injury certainly made the Red Sox’ 11-inning, 4-3 loss to the Rays more difficult to stomach, as was evident by the mood in the clubhouse following the game.

“That hurt. That kid has been doing so good for us,” said Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz. “Losing him that way, just, did you hear what he said? MRI? Hopefully it’s not bad. But the way they took him off the field it seems like it’s not looking good. Let’s wait and see what they say. Hopefully it’s a couple of days kind of thing.”

“That stinks,” said Red Sox starting pitcher Rick Porcello. “Hopefully everything turns out all right and he can make a speedy recovery. He just got up here. He’s been doing so well. He’s made a really big impact for our team. To see him go down definitely hurts. We’ll cross our fingers and hope it’s something he can recover from quickly.”

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford
Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi (left) rolls his left ankle while being erased on a double play on Wednesday vs. the Rays. (Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi (left) rolls his left ankle while being erased on a double play on Wednesday vs. the Rays. (Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

The Red Sox lost a game in horrible fashion, but that might not have been the worst takeaway from Wednesday’s 4-3 walk-off loss to the Rays.

The defeat came at a steep cost as rookie outfielder Andrew Benintendi, who has given the team an injection of life, badly rolled his left ankle while attempting to retreat to second base on a grounder to short. He needed to be helped off the field and was later diagnosed with a knee sprain.

The Red Sox blew a 3-0 lead and lost in the 11th on an error by pitcher Heath Hembree, who failed to glove Travis Shaw’s underhand flip at first. Hembree fired home in an attempt to nail runner Luke Maile at the plate, but Sandy Leon couldn’t handle the throw and Maile was ruled safe as the Rays celebrated.

The Red Sox had a chance to claim sole possession of first place in the American League East, because the Blue Jays lost to the Angels. The Red Sox lost for just the third part in 13 games.

Seeking his 18th win, starter Rick Porcello faltered with a 3-2 lead in the eighth when he hung a curveball to Evan Longoria, who did not miss, sending it deep into the left field seats for a game-tying homer.

Porcello ended up going 7 2/3 innings, allowing three runs on nine hits, striking out eight. He lacked command for the first three innings before finding a groove with his curveball, at least until Longoria hit it out. He threw a season-high 123 pitches.

David Ortiz put the Red Sox on the board in the first with a two-run homer, his 30th of the season, topping 100 RBIs in the process. The Red Sox added another run in the third on a Mookie Betts RBI single.

The Rays chipped away with two in the third on a two-run double by Brad Miller after Porcello looked like he’d escape a two-out jam.

Closing Time note

Wednesday marked the 12th time in Dustin Pedroia’s career that he’s stolen two bases in a game.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

— David Ortiz continues to swing the bat well, blasting his 30th home run of the year in the same stadium where he recorded No. 500 last September. He not only becomes the oldest player in history to record 30 homers, he also becomes the first 40-year-old to put together a 30-100 season.

— Brock Holt had a solid night defensively at third — most notably when he saved a run in the fourth inning by backhanding a grounder with two outs and runners on second and third before spinning to make a strong throw to first.

WHAT WENT WRONG

— Andrew Benitiendi left the game with a left knee injury. He was hurt after making a poor read on the bases and attempting to return to second on a grounder to short. He was tagged out and twisted his left ankle awkwardly, though his injury was later announced as a knee strain.

— Porcello had a rough eighth inning, allowing a home run and another baserunner. When he exited, he had reached 123 pitches.

— Robbie Ross Jr. walked Logan Morrison, the only batter he faced. Ross Jr. was attempting to close out the eighth inning, but instead had to be replaced by Brad Ziegler, who escaped a bases-loaded jam with a strikeout.

— The last play was a disaster. Hembree should’ve held onto Shaw’s flip, and if Leon had been able to glove Hembree’s relay, Maile would’ve been out at the plate.

Blog Author: 
Logan Mullen

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Just when you thought nothing could go wrong on this road trip for the Red Sox, along came the seventh inning Wednesday night.

Andrew Benintendi

Andrew Benintendi

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Just when you thought nothing could go wrong on this road trip for the Red Sox, along came the seventh inning Wednesday night.

With Andrew Benintendi on second base, Dustin Pedroia grounded a ball to Rays shortstop Matt Duffy. In an attempt to avoid the tag from Duffy, Benintendi appeared to get his left cleat caught in the dirt, resulting in the bending of either the rookie’s ankle or knee.

Benintendi stayed on the ground until Red Sox manager John Farrell and trainer Brad Pearson could arrive to look at the player, who was on his knees near second base. The outfielder would ultimately be helped off the field, putting his weight on both Farrell and Pearson.

At the time of the injury, the Red Sox carried a 3-2 lead over the Rays, with Benintendi having doubled to lead off the seventh. The 22-year-old is currently hitting .324 with an .850 OPS.

Check back for more updates …

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Usually when someone wants to get reaction to David Ortiz breaking some milestone, his canned answer this season has been, “It just means I’m getting old.”

Cue up the quote machine.

David Ortiz. (Steve Mitchell/USA Today Sports)

David Ortiz. (Steve Mitchell/USA Today Sports)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Usually when someone wants to get reaction to David Ortiz breaking some milestone, his canned answer this season has been, “It just means I’m getting old.”

Cue up the quote machine.

The Red Sox’ designated hitter made history Wednesday night, jumping on a first-pitch curveball from Tampa Bay starter Matt Andriese in the first inning, sending it into the right field bleachers for his 30th home run of the season.

With the two-run blast Ortiz becomes the oldest player in Major League Baseball history to hit 30 homers in a single season, having managed the feat at 40 years and 280 days old.

The home run also allowed Ortiz to reach 100 RBI for the season. He joins Babe Ruth, Albert Pujols, Hank Aaron and Lou Gehrig as the only players with 10 or more season of at least 30 homers and 100 RBI for a single team.

Ortiz now has nine 100 RBI seasons with the Red Sox, tying him with Ted Williams for the most in franchise history.

To watch the homer, click here.

Blog Author: 
Rob Bradford

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — It goes without saying, the Red Sox could have used Carson Smith this season.