The 2015 ESPYs will be held July 15 and the Patriots are up for five awards at the annual event.

The 2015 ESPYs will be held July 15 and the Patriots are up for five awards at the annual event.

Best coach/manager: Bill Belichick
Best game: Super Bowl XLIX
Best NFL player: Tom Brady
Best comeback athlete: Rob Gronkowski
Best play: Malcolm Butler interception

Fans can vote on the winners, by clicking here.

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

By winning their fourth Super Bowl title in franchise history this past February, the Patriots are celebrating a little different than everyone.

They posted this photo to Instagram on July 3.

#FBF That other time we celebrated the fourth. #Patriots

A photo posted by New England Patriots (@patriots) on

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Judge Susan A.

Judge Susan A. Garsh, who oversaw Aaron Hernandez‘s trial for the murder of Odin Lloyd, refused a motion to toss the ex-Patriot’s first-degree murder conviction or at least reduce it to second-degree murder on Wednesday.

Hernandez’s defense lawyers asked the court to “invalidate the jury’s verdict and find Hernandez not guilty on the murder charge and one of the gun charges,” according to the Hartford Courant.

Garsh, in refuting the motions, which was a procedural step that needed to be taken before an appeal, wrote in a ruling that “considering the evidence in the light most favorable to the Commonwealth, the court finds that a rational jury could find that the Commonwealth proved every essential element of the crimes charged in counts 1 and 2 beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Hernandez was convicted in April of first-degree murder, which holds an automatic life sentence without parole.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Judy Cohen

On Wednesday, former Patriots linebacker Brandon Spikes pleaded guilty to three counts of leaving the scene of a crash resulting in personal injury for the car incident he was involved in last month.

Spikes was speeding and driving negligently when he crashed his 2011 Mercedes Maybach into the back of a Nissan Murano on I-495 in Foxboro early in the morning on June 7.

On Wednesday, former Patriots linebacker Brandon Spikes pleaded guilty to three counts of leaving the scene of a crash resulting in personal injury for the car incident he was involved in last month.

Spikes was speeding and driving negligently when he crashed his 2011 Mercedes Maybach into the back of a Nissan Murano on I-495 in Foxboro early in the morning on June 7.

He was sentenced to one-year probation plus a $1,000 fine and a surcharge, while he also lost his license for a year. Several other charges were continued without a finding, including charges of negligent operation of a motor vehicle and operation of an uninsured motor vehicle.

The incident sent three occupants of the other vehicle to the hospital with minor injuries. Spikes’ Maybach had called an emergency assistance service claiming to have struck a deer, but responding officers found no evidence of a deer.

The Patriots released Spikes the Monday morning after the incident.

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

In an interview with ESPN’s Ashley Fox, NFL executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent was critical of the NFLPA in their decisions to take cases to court when challenging rulings set by commissioner Roger Goodell.

Vincent is referring to cases involving Adrian Peterson, Ray Rice, Greg Hardy and potentially Tom Brady.

“Look at the amount of money being spent on legal fees for a handful of people,” said Vincent. “It’s millions and millions of dollars, and we’ve got players that are hurting. We’ve got young men who don’t know how to identify a good financial adviser. Men are in transition who aren’t doing well, and yet $8-10 million a year is spent in court fees about who should make a decision on someone, who in some cases has committed a crime.

“Think about that logically. Wouldn’t it be better to spend our time and resources on the issues that are vital to our players — past, present and future — such as the players’ total wellness and growing the game together?”

Vincent was the one who imposed the four-game suspension on Brady for his role in Deflategate. He defended his decision to Fox.

“Somebody has to protect the integrity of the game,” Vincent said. “That’s my responsibility, to protect and preserve the competitive fairness of professional football. That’s why our game is so great, because we protect the integrity of the game.”

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

In an interview with ESPN’s Ashley Fox, NFL executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent was critical of the NFLPA in their decisions to take cases to court when challenging rulings set by commissioner Roger Goodell.

Vincent is referring to cases involving Adrian Peterson, Ray Rice, Greg Hardy and potentially Tom Brady.

“Look at the amount of money being spent on legal fees for a handful of people,” said Vincent. “It’s millions and millions of dollars, and we’ve got players that are hurting. We’ve got young men who don’t know how to identify a good financial adviser. Men are in transition who aren’t doing well, and yet $8-10 million a year is spent in court fees about who should make a decision on someone, who in some cases has committed a crime.

“Think about that logically. Wouldn’t it be better to spend our time and resources on the issues that are vital to our players — past, present and future — such as the players’ total wellness and growing the game together?”

Vincent was the one who imposed the four-game suspension on Brady for his role in Deflategate. He defended his decision to Fox.

“Somebody has to protect the integrity of the game,” Vincent said. “That’s my responsibility, to protect and preserve the competitive fairness of professional football. That’s why our game is so great, because we protect the integrity of the game.”

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Tom Brady leads a healthy group of Big 10 alums on the New England roster. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Could Tom Brady try and sue Roger Goodell or the league for defamation if he’s cleared?. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Tom Brady has been caught up in the Deflategate maelstrom since just after the AFC title game, and has been forced to deal with a series of attacks on his character as a result. While others have been quick to say he’s guilty, the quarterback has maintained his innocence.

While the story has yet to play out completely, if Brady is exonerated in some form or fashion over the next few months — whether it’s the result of having his suspension wiped clean by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell or having the penalty overturned in court — could he try and get some payback against the league in the form of a defamation suit? Legal analyst Michael McCann said Monday that Brady would “face an uphill climb” if he chose that course of action against the league, the commissioner or Troy Vincent, the NFL’s executive vice president of football operations who initially handed down the four-game suspension.

“Brady would need to show that not only were public statements made about him false and damaging to his reputation, but he’d have to show those statements were made with actual malice, which means knowingly or intentionally,” McCann said. “In other words, if the Wells Report contained reputationally-damaging inaccuracies or lies about Brady, that would not be enough for Brady to prevail in a defamation lawsuit. He’d have to show that Wells included statements that Wells knew were false. That would be hard to show, especially as it relates to a controversy where there remain different scientific opinions and theories about what may have happened.

“Debate about the science in Deflategate is itself a defense for defendants in any defamation lawsuit brought by Brady. Those defendants can argue that at the time they made those statements about Brady, there was debate about what happened in Deflategate and thus a lack of consensus about what constituted the truth and what constituted a lie.”

There is some precedent here for a player pursuing legal action against the league. Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma, who was initially suspended for a season for his apparent involvement in the Bountygate scandal, later saw his ban lifted. Consequently, he filed a defamation suit against Goodell, one that was later dismissed because of insufficient claims and evidence. (When initially told about Deflategate, Vilma had some simple advice for Brady: “Lawyer up.”) If Brady decided to pursue legal action against the league, even though Vilma’s case wasn’t successful, McCann believes he would at least ponder taking a page from Vilma’s playbook.

“If he decided to go that route, Brady would likely retain attorneys who specialize in defamation litigation,” McCann said. “One possibility is Peter Ginsberg, a New York City attorney who represented Jonathan Vilma in Vilma’s defamation lawsuit against Roger Goodell in the aftermath of Bountygate. Ginsberg has represented other athletes as well, including Michael Irvin and Vijah Singh, in legal matters concerning their reputation.”

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price