Earlier Monday the NFL gave their side, now it appears the NFLPA and Tom Brady are giving their side.

Earlier Monday the NFL gave their side, now it appears the NFLPA and Tom Brady are giving their side.

After it was reported the NFL was willing to take a game off of Brady’s four-game suspension, according to NFL Media’s Ian Rapoport, Brady was open to accepting a one-game suspension for not cooperating with Ted Wells’ investigation.

With the sides clearly far apart, no settlement was reached Monday with the two sides meeting in court with Judge Richard Berman.

The report added the door remains open for a settlement with Berman expected to rule sometime this week.

The Patriots open the regular season a week from Thursday at Gillette Stadium against the Steelers.

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

DraftKings Kick off this football season with the biggest fantasy football contest ever on DraftKings! Prizes worth $10 million are up for grabs, including $2 million for first AND $1 million for second! PLAY IN THE WEEK 1 MILLIONAIRE MAKER, CLICK HERE.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Jimmy Garoppolo has some of the best stats of any quarterback in the league this preseason. But what does that really mean? (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Jimmy Garoppolo has some of the best stats of any quarterback in the league this preseason. But what does that really mean? (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Five thoughts on potential Patriots, old and new, as well as preseason quarterback stats.

1. Fred Jackson was cut loose by the Bills on Monday after eight successful years in Buffalo. The 34-year-old, who has always been respected by Bill Belichick, has always been known as a good hands guy out of the backfield, having averaged 40 catches a year in his eight seasons in the league. That includes 66 last season with the Bills. So would he fit with the Patriots, a team that’s still seeking some help in the post-Shane Vereen era? Despite the fact that New England has more than a few possibilities in camp vying for the third-down job, New England would be foolish not to at least kick the tires on Jackson, who has also shown an ability to run between the tackles on occasion. (He’s averaged 4.4 yards per carry over the course of his career, and has topped 500 yards rushing in six of his eight seasons in the league.) He’s a relatively young 34 in that he didn’t get his shot at the NFL until he was 26, and so the usual expiration date for a running back might not necessarily apply to the Coe College product. Some food for thought.

2. Another release that caught our eye on Monday was guard Donald Thomas, who was cut loose by the Colts. The likable veteran, who spent two seasons with the Patriots (2011-2012) signed a four-year $14 million deal with the Colts shortly after hitting the market as a free agent. But the UConn product never panned out — he tore his right quad and left biceps in Week 2 in 2013, causing him to miss the rest of the season. His 2014 season was similar washout, as he tore the same quad in training camp and never saw the field. While there’s some question about Thomas’ health at this stage of his career, if he’s OK, he would represent a nice pickup for the Patriots, who could use some depth along the interior line. Thomas would be cost-effective, he knows the system and he could bring depth to a position of need. Ultimately, like Jackson, there’s no harm in at least inquiring about him at this stage of the summer.

3. The Kenbrell Thompkins question is another instance of a former Patriot suddenly becoming available and providing some support in an area where New England has had some health issues. Thompkins, who was released Monday by the Raiders, spent a season-plus with New England, and the 27-year-old caught 38 passes for 519 yards and four touchdowns before being released last fall. The 6-foot, 196-pounder, who was a relatively reliable intermediate threat while he was with the Patriots, played the last 12 games of the 2014 season in Oakland before being shown the door this week. Thompkins is a pass catcher in the Brandon LaFell mold, a quicker receiver who can occasionally go deep. Between LaFell, Reggie Wayne and Thompkins, there is some offensive redundancy, but he could be a target for New England depending on how it feels about the other two receivers, particularly in the short-term.

4. One note on New England’s quarterback play over the course of the preseason: Just as we would caution you to not read too much into the fact that this is, at least from a statistical standpoint, likely to be Tom Brady’s worst preseason stat line of his career, folks shouldn’t get too jacked up about the fact that Jimmy Garoppolo is having one of the best preseasons of any quarterback in the league. The second-year man out of Eastern Illinois is 61-for-80 (76 percent completion rate) for 554 yards, to go along with two touchdowns and two picks. Here are some of the best preseason performances for quarterbacks with at least 30 pass attempts to their credit going into the final week of the preseason, ranked by completion percentage:

Minnesota’s Teddy Bridgewater: 29-for-35 (83 percent) for 295 yards with one touchdown
Miami’s Ryan Tannehill: 33-for-41 (81 percent) for 303 yards, with three touchdowns
Washington’s Kirk Cousins: 40-for-53 (76 percent) for 435 yards with two touchdowns and one interception.
Green Bay’s Brett Hundley: 29-for-42 (69 percent) for 394 yards, with three touchdowns and one interception.
Denver’s Brock Osweiler: 37-for-56 (66 percent) for 376 yards, with two touchdowns and one interception.
Kansas City’s Chase Daniels: 25-for-33 (66 percent) for 271 yards with four touchdowns.
Jacksonville’s Blake Bortles: 39-for-60 (65 percent) for 461 yards with one touchdown.

5. In that same vein, there’s a great piece here by Danny Kelly, who breaks down preseason quarterbacking numbers from 2014 and tries to figure out if there’s any correlation between a young signal-caller excelling in the preseason and having a good regular season. Kelly deconstructs the numbers to find that Bridgewater and Oakland’s Derek Carr were the two rookies last year who saw a good preseason carry over into the regular season. Meanwhile Bortles, Cousins and Zach Mettenberger weren’t able to have their solid preseason stats translate to a similar regular season. For what it’s worth, he also puts Garoppolo’s 2014 preseason under the microscope. An interesting story that’s worth your time.

DraftKings Kick off this football season with the biggest fantasy football contest ever on DraftKings! Prizes worth $10 million are up for grabs, including $2 million for first AND $1 million for second! PLAY IN THE WEEK 1 MILLIONAIRE MAKER, CLICK HERE.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price
Jimmy Garoppolo has some of the best stats of any quarterback in the league this preseason. But what does that really mean? (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Jimmy Garoppolo has some of the best stats of any quarterback in the league this preseason. But what does that really mean? (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Five thoughts on potential Patriots, old and new, as well as preseason quarterback stats.

1. Fred Jackson was cut loose by the Bills on Monday after eight successful years in Buffalo. The 34-year-old, who has always been respected by Bill Belichick, has always been known as a good hands guy out of the backfield, having averaged 40 catches a year in his eight seasons in the league. That includes 66 last season with the Bills. So would he fit with the Patriots, a team that’s still seeking some help in the post-Shane Vereen era? Despite the fact that New England has more than a few possibilities in camp vying for the third-down job, New England would be foolish not to at least kick the tires on Jackson, who has also shown an ability to run between the tackles on occasion. (He’s averaged 4.4 yards per carry over the course of his career, and has topped 500 yards rushing in six of his eight seasons in the league.) He’s a relatively young 34 in that he didn’t get his shot at the NFL until he was 26, and so the usual expiration date for a running back might not necessarily apply to the Coe College product. Some food for thought.

2. Another release that caught our eye on Monday was guard Donald Thomas, who was cut loose by the Colts. The likable veteran, who spent two seasons with the Patriots (2011-2012) signed a four-year $14 million deal with the Colts shortly after hitting the market as a free agent. But the UConn product never panned out — he tore his right quad and left biceps in Week 2 in 2013, causing him to miss the rest of the season. His 2014 season was similar washout, as he tore the same quad in training camp and never saw the field. While there’s some question about Thomas’ health at this stage of his career, if he’s OK, he would represent a nice pickup for the Patriots, who could use some depth along the interior line. Thomas would be cost-effective, he knows the system and he could bring depth to a position of need. Ultimately, like Jackson, there’s no harm in at least inquiring about him at this stage of the summer.

3. The Kenbrell Thompkins question is another instance of a former Patriot suddenly becoming available and providing some support in an area where New England has had some health issues. Thompkins, who was released Monday by the Raiders, spent a season-plus with New England, and the 27-year-old caught 38 passes for 519 yards and four touchdowns before being released last fall. The 6-foot, 196-pounder, who was a relatively reliable intermediate threat while he was with the Patriots, played the last 12 games of the 2014 season in Oakland before being shown the door this week. Thompkins is a pass catcher in the Brandon LaFell mold, a quicker receiver who can occasionally go deep. Between LaFell, Reggie Wayne and Thompkins, there is some offensive redundancy, but he could be a target for New England depending on how it feels about the other two receivers, particularly in the short-term.

4. One note on New England’s quarterback play over the course of the preseason: Just as we would caution you to not read too much into the fact that this is, at least from a statistical standpoint, likely to be Tom Brady’s worst preseason stat line of his career, folks shouldn’t get too jacked up about the fact that Jimmy Garoppolo is having one of the best preseasons of any quarterback in the league. The second-year man out of Eastern Illinois is 61-for-80 (76 percent completion rate) for 554 yards, to go along with two touchdowns and two picks. Here are some of the best preseason performances for quarterbacks with at least 30 pass attempts to their credit going into the final week of the preseason, ranked by completion percentage:

Minnesota’s Teddy Bridgewater: 29-for-35 (83 percent) for 295 yards with one touchdown
Miami’s Ryan Tannehill: 33-for-41 (81 percent) for 303 yards, with three touchdowns
Washington’s Kirk Cousins: 40-for-53 (76 percent) for 435 yards with two touchdowns and one interception.
Green Bay’s Brett Hundley: 29-for-42 (69 percent) for 394 yards, with three touchdowns and one interception.
Denver’s Brock Osweiler: 37-for-56 (66 percent) for 376 yards, with two touchdowns and one interception.
Kansas City’s Chase Daniels: 25-for-33 (66 percent) for 271 yards with four touchdowns.
Jacksonville’s Blake Bortles: 39-for-60 (65 percent) for 461 yards with one touchdown.

5. In that same vein, there’s a great piece here by Danny Kelly, who breaks down preseason quarterbacking numbers from 2014 and tries to figure out if there’s any correlation between a young signal-caller excelling in the preseason and having a good regular season. Kelly deconstructs the numbers to find that Bridgewater and Oakland’s Derek Carr were the two rookies last year who saw a good preseason carry over into the regular season. Meanwhile Bortles, Cousins and Zach Mettenberger weren’t able to have their solid preseason stats translate to a similar regular season. For what it’s worth, he also puts Garoppolo’s 2014 preseason under the microscope. An interesting story that’s worth your time.

DraftKings Kick off this football season with the biggest fantasy football contest ever on DraftKings! Prizes worth $10 million are up for grabs, including $2 million for first AND $1 million for second! PLAY IN THE WEEK 1 MILLIONAIRE MAKER, CLICK HERE.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price
We check in with Patriots special teams captain Matthew Slater on a Patriots Monday as the Patriots prepare for their fourth pre-season game, and are 10 days away from opening the 2015 season.

[0:04:10] ... enough good things would change Dylan. And what he means to this football team and and who uses super. Gonna ask you did to theorize forming here because as I was watching the game it just jumped out at me. Our offense and defense doesn't mingle very much on the sidelines as we all know there's a bench for the offense and a bench for the defense. And it was a lengthy shot on the telecast the other night of Tom Brady and Rob Ninkovich sitting on the bench together talking. And as I watched it I thought now that wouldn't happen normally in a game they ...
[0:05:01] ... is the year for awhile veterans and their two leaders on this football team. You know who knows what they're talking amount. As it relates to football but you know I think during the pre season ...
[0:11:06] ... stayed late he still came after after have to act as the New England Patriots joining us here at Sports Radio W yeah. ...





We check in with the head coach of the Patriots on a Pats Monday to get his take on the win over Carolina, pre-season game number four, and the numerous cuts to the team's roster he must make in the upcoming weeks.

FOXBORO — The Patriots released two of their young wide receivers on Monday as part of the effort to trim the roster down to the 75-man limit by 4 p.m. ET Tuesday.

LeGarrette Blount

LeGarrette Blount

FOXBORO — LeGarrette Blount is one of a hand full of players who won’t be on the field at Gillette Stadium Sept. 10 for the NFL’s season-opener when the Patriots host the Steelers.

Blount has been suspended one game for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. The sixth-year running back says he isn’t thinking about it.

“I’m not even thinking that far ahead,” Blount said Monday. “I am focused on making sure I get better and making sure I am doing everything I can to maximize every opportunity I am going to get. Besides that, that’s the only thing on my mind right now.”

With the start of the regular-season so close, some minds might start to look ahead to the games that count, but Blount said he and the team aren’t doing that as there is still work left to be done in the preseason, especially for Blount with him missing Week 1.

“If you’re focused on getting better and what you have to do it’s not hard at all,” he said. “You can only get better. You can only take it a day at a time. You can’t waste your time focusing on things that are two weeks away.”

Blount will miss the opening game against his former team, the Steelers, who released him late November of last year after he walked off the field in the middle of a game. The Patriots then signed him a few days later. He said the hardest part about missing the game is making sure he’s ready for his return in Week 2 when the team travels to Buffalo to face the Bills.

“I just have to make sure I am ready,” he said. “I have to make sure I am good and I stay on top of my game, on top of the offense, on top of all the opportunities I am hoping to get. So as long as I stay good and in shape I am going to be good.”

DraftKings Kick off this football season with the biggest fantasy football contest ever on DraftKings! Prizes worth $10 million are up for grabs, including $2 million for first AND $1 million for second! PLAY IN THE WEEK 1 MILLIONAIRE MAKER, CLICK HERE.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Jonathan Krause

Jonathan Krause

FOXBORO — The Patriots released two of their young wide receivers on Monday as part of the effort to trim the roster down to the 75-man limit by 4 p.m. ET Tuesday.

But the two receivers, Josh Boyce and Jonathan Krause were designated with the injury tag, meaning the Patriots can reclaim and stash them on the roster on injured reserve. The team is not required to release an official injury report detailing a specific injury until Week 1.

This has been a common practice in the last several weeks by the Patriots. Brian Tyms injured his foot in joint practices with the Saints in West Virginia on Aug. 19. He was waived with injury designation on Aug. 24 and claimed the next day and placed immediately on injured reserve.

Last Thursday, the team did the same with defensive end-turned-tight end Jake Bequette. He missed the first two preseason games and was waived with the injury designation. A day later he landed back in Foxboro on injured reserve.

The Patriots currently have five players on season-ending injured reserve, including receivers Brandon Gibson and Tyms, running back Tyler Gaffney, Bequette and tight end A.J. Derby.

The other two waivers were tight end Jimmay Mundine and defensive lineman Joe Vellano. The release of linebacker Dekoda Watson falls in a different category as he is a vested NFL veteran.

As a team looks toward Saturday’s 4 p.m. roster cut to 53, a refresher course in the practice squad is in order. For the 2014 and ’15 seasons, the NFL agreed to expand the practice squad from eight to 10 players.

A player must have a minimum of six games – up from the previous three games – on a practice squad in order for that season to count as one of the player’s three permissible seasons of practice squad service. So, if a player was on a practice squad for just five games in a particular team’s season, he gets an added season of PS eligibility.

Second, each club will be permitted to sign a maximum of two practice squad players who have earned no more than two accrued seasons of free agency credit. Absent this exception, a player who has earned one or more accrued seasons would not be eligible for a practice squad unless the player spent fewer than nine games on a club’s 46-player (game day) active list in each of his accrued seasons.

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia
Jonathan Krause

Jonathan Krause

FOXBORO — The Patriots released two of their young wide receivers on Monday as part of the effort to trim the roster down to the 75-man limit by 4 p.m. ET Tuesday.

But the two receivers, Josh Boyce and Jonathan Krause were designated with the injury tag, meaning the Patriots can reclaim and stash them on the roster on injured reserve. The team is not required to release an official injury report detailing a specific injury until Week 1.

This has been a common practice in the last several weeks by the Patriots. Brian Tyms injured his foot in joint practices with the Saints in West Virginia on Aug. 19. He was waived with injury designation on Aug. 24 and claimed the next day and placed immediately on injured reserve.

Last Thursday, the team did the same with defensive end-turned-tight end Jake Bequette. He missed the first two preseason games and was waived with the injury designation. A day later he landed back in Foxboro on injured reserve.

The Patriots currently have five players on season-ending injured reserve, including receivers Brandon Gibson and Tyms, running back Tyler Gaffney, Bequette and tight end A.J. Derby.

The other two waivers were tight end Jimmay Mundine and defensive lineman Joe Vellano. The release of linebacker Dekoda Watson falls in a different category as he is a vested NFL veteran.

As a team looks toward Saturday’s 4 p.m. roster cut to 53, a refresher course in the practice squad is in order. For the 2014 and ’15 seasons, the NFL agreed to expand the practice squad from eight to 10 players.

A player must have a minimum of six games – up from the previous three games – on a practice squad in order for that season to count as one of the player’s three permissible seasons of practice squad service. So, if a player was on a practice squad for just five games in a particular team’s season, he gets an added season of PS eligibility.

Second, each club will be permitted to sign a maximum of two practice squad players who have earned no more than two accrued seasons of free agency credit. Absent this exception, a player who has earned one or more accrued seasons would not be eligible for a practice squad unless the player spent fewer than nine games on a club’s 46-player (game day) active list in each of his accrued seasons.

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia