Tom Brady

Tom Brady

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been a major topic in football, particularly since the release of the movie “Concussion” last year.

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady feels it’s “a very important topic.”

“It’s a very important topic,” Brady told ABC News Monday while he was in New York promoting Simmons’ new mattress, Beautyrest Black. “If you are going to put yourself kind of in the line of fire, so to speak, you better educate yourself.”

“I think there’s been more awareness from the general media on what CTE is, how it affects you, the long term ramifications of it,” he added. “I think, as an athlete, you have to take all those things into consideration and try to be as proactive as you can. Gain information, then go through the proper protocols if you do get a concussion.”

Brady has done a good job over the years of avoiding big hits and sometimes giving himself up so he doesn’t take a punishing hit.

“I’ve been very fortunate over the course of my career,” Brady said. “So, part of it, I try to take care of myself and prevent a lot of injuries, as well. When you do get them, you just have to deal with them the best way you can.”

Added Brady: “It’s just part of life, you know, not only football, but contact sports. It’s part of people walking down the street. You run, you fall, you hit your head. There’s a lot of sports that are involved, but I think it’s good there’s more awareness than there’s been in the past. Woman’s soccer and cycling, water polo, there’s a lot of sports.”

The quarterback will turn 39 in August, but is playing some of the best football of his life.

“You’d hate to stop doing something you love to do cause of an injury,” Brady said. “I’m someone that’s a proponent, yeah, keep doing what you love to do, but treat your body the right way and then you’ll be able to continue doing it.

“I believe quality over quantity, so play football and love doing that, then take good care of yourself and afterwards, hopefully try to live a great life.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Devin Lucien wore No. 15 in college, but he was given No. 16 by the Patriots. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Devin Lucien wore No. 15 in college, but he was given No. 16 by the Patriots. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

The complete list of numbers for the 2016 rookie class have been released. We noted a few of them here, but here’s the rest of the digits we weren’t aware of before this morning, plus some of the histories behind each of the numbers.

CB V’Angelo Bentley — 9 — Isaiah Stanback, one of the nicer guys in the New England locker room over the last decade or so and a quarterback turned wide receiver, had No. 9 last back in 2009.
WR Devin Lucien — 16 — Special teamer Kamar Aiken had it for a brief stretch back in 2012. Before that, Matty Cassel sported No. 16 while he was with the Patriots.
CB Cre’Von LeBlanc 35 — A favorite of running backs over the last decade or so, it was also sported by Jonas Gray and Patrick Pass.
TE Steven Scheu — 44 — A favorite for tight ends at the back of the depth chart, No. 44 has been worn proudly by the likes of Asante Cleveland and Zach Sudfeld. Linebacker Darius Fleming and fullback Heath Evans both also had it briefly.
LB C.J. Johnson — 47 — Does this truly herald the end of the Joey Iosefa era? He was the last guy to wear No. 47 before it was awarded to Johnson earlier this spring. Michael Hoomananwanui also had it for a spell when he was in New England.
LB Elandon Roberts — 51 — Not sure I agree with handing out No. 51 so soon after Jerod Mayo decided to call it a career, but such is life in the NFL. Quite the footsteps to follow in for the youngster out of Houston.
DL Woodrow Hamilton — 74 — Dominique Easley had it as a rookie in 2014 before switching to 99. Also worn by offensive linemen Will Svitek and Billy Yates and defensive lineman Kyle Love.
TE Bryce Williams — 81 — Interesting number that has some baggage in New England: Tim Wright, Aaron Hernandez and Randy Moss all had it while they played for the Patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Phil Savage knows a few things about Cyrus Jones.</p>
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According to our friends at the NFL Network, this week’s edition of “The Top 100 Players of 2016” will include a member of the Patriots who will be making his second career appearance on the list. This week’s countdown is for players ranked between No. 90 and 81. (The list is determined solely by the votes of current NFL players.)

Potential candidates include wide receiver Julian Edelman, who was number 91 on last year’s list — the first time in his career he made the Top 100.

This week’s show is set for Wednesday at 8 p.m. on NFL Network. Immediately afterward, “The Top 100 Players of 2016 Reactions Show” airs with host Amber Theoharis and analyst Eric Davis.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

Being an NFL quarterback is hard enough, but turning 39 years old in August and still playing quarterback like Tom Brady has is even harder.

Speaking at an event in New York City on Monday to promote Simmons’ new mattress Beautyrest Black, Brady detailed “concessions” he makes in life to continue to perform at the level he has.

Tom Brady talked about the "concessions" he's had to make in life to keep playing the way he has. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Today Sports)

Tom Brady talked about the “concessions” he’s had to make in life to keep playing the way he has. (Mark J. Rebilas/USA Today Sports)

Being an NFL quarterback is hard enough, but turning 39 years old in August and still playing quarterback like Tom Brady has is even harder.

Speaking at an event in New York City on Monday to promote Simmons’ new mattress Beautyrest Black, Brady detailed “concessions” he makes in life to continue to perform at the level he has.

“As you get older, you have more responsibilities, you have more commitments, more events, kids, you’re married now,” Brady said via ABC News. “You still have all the things that you’ve had, plus you just keep adding. I got a lot.”

Brady said he doesn’t stay up late watching TV shows or anything like that. The quarterback said he goes to bed around 8:30 p.m. and wakes up at 5:30 a.m.

“Yeah, none of that,” Brady said. “I don’t go to bed at 1 a.m. and wake up at 5 a.m. and say, ‘Let’s see if I can get this done today.’”

“Because my career is so important, I think I make a lot of, I wouldn’t call them sacrifices, but just concessions for my job. I love what I do and I want to do it for a long time,” he added.

The 38-year-old talked about some of the “concessions” he’s needed to make.

“Sometimes, it’s hard to cut things out, for me where I cut is like my friends, they probably don’t get as much time as they used to,” Brady said. “When you’re one of the leaders of the team, there are no days off.”

Added Brady: “I have to make different choices, there’s no other 39-year-olds playing now at quarterback. So, you better do things a little differently. I try to not eat as much sugar, but it’s so hard in our American diet to do that. … It’s hard to completely avoid. I don’t drink much alcohol.”

So, does Brady have time to enjoy himself?

“During the season, most of my time to unwind is in my car ride home,” he said. “When I get home, it’s being with my kids. There’s not much time to unwind, but you know what, it’s because I love what I do. I look forward to the season. I look forward to playing games. It doesn’t ever feel like work.”

“I like being active,” Brady added. “I like to surf a lot, play a little bit of golf. But it’s a lot of work and being with my family.”

Brady is under contract with the Patriots until the end of the 2019 season when he will be 42 years old.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Sean McDonough

Sean McDonough

ESPN commentator Sean McDonough joined Dennis & Callahan with Minihane on Tuesday morning to talk about his new job as play-by-play announcer for Monday Night Football. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

McDonough, 53, has done play-by-play for the World Series, the NCAA Final Four and the Olympics. He also was the voice of the Red Sox on NESN from 1988 to 2004.

On Monday, McDonough was named the new play-by-play announcer for ESPN’s Monday Night Football, replacing Mike Tirico. He will join Jon Gruden in the booth, with Lisa Salters continuing in-game reporting.

“It really hasn’t sunk in yet,” McDonough said about getting the job. “I’m sitting here looking at a bunch of texts and emails and phone messages I need to return. Every time I think I’m making progress there’s more of them that keep coming in. It’s been awesome. I think anybody in this business would want to have the opportunity to do Monday Night Football. It’s something that I’ve certainly had on a list of things I’d love to do if the opportunity ever came along. I still can’t believe it’s happening.”

Added McDonough: “Two weeks ago I was walking out of the gym when my phone rang. It was [ESPN executive vice president] John Wildhack and he said Mike was leaving and there’s a very short list of people to replace him on MNF and you’re at the top of the list. [MNF producer] Jay Rothman came out here a week and a half ago and they offered me the job, and it’s been a real emotional time ever since.”

Following are more highlights from the interview. For more Patriots news, visit the team page at weei.com/patriots.

On the preparation that comes with announcing Monday Night Football: “Really, it started now. One of the things that amazed me is the amazing research department they have. They sent me a couple of examples of research material from last season that they provide typically on a weekend basis. It’s absolutely unbelievable, I’m used to doing that all by myself, there’s going to be an awful lot of help. I got to immerse myself in the NFL, I’ve really just paid attention to it the last few years as a fan. Most of my focus has been on college football, so the learning starts now.”

On Jon Gruden: “He’s a fascinating guy, I think there’s more in there to bring out. If ESPN thinks I’m good at that and that’s part of what they’d like me to do, then I’ll do that. You see that personality when you watch the Gruden quarterback camps and he’s sort of in his comfort zone in his office talking to the players. I think sometimes coaches and analysts when they get in the booth get so focused and intense on the game and try to figure out what’s going on in the game that sometimes the personality part of them doesn’t really come out. I’d like to make it a little bit lighter when the moment allows for it, but that stuff has to happen naturally.”

On working to mend the relationship between New England fans and ESPN following Deflategate: “I don’t know, I just hope that this is one of those things that kind of goes away over time. It’s just amazing for me that this whole Deflategate thing took on this life that it has beyond anybody’s wildest expectations. We’ll see how it plays out, hopefully there’s some sort of satisfying ending for all parties soon. I can’t imagine that’s going to happen, but I’d rather just show up and announce the game in December when we’re in Foxboro when the Ravens play.”

On his father, Will McDonough, the former Boston Globe football writer who died in 2003: “When they offered me the job, they came out here to my house in Arizona, and we chatted for three hours. As soon as they got up and shook my hand and hugged me and said, ‘You’re definitely the guy,’ I told them I’m going to have a moment here, and I was really just thinking of my dad. I called my brother Terry, the vice president of the Cardinals. It was during the draft, I actually texted him and he sent me a selfie of tears about to come down his face and said, ‘I had to get up from our draft table for a second.’ I’m sure he was thinking about dad, too. You guys know, my dad loved the NFL and it was a huge part of his life, it was always a huge part of our life, and I’m sure he thinks this is a pretty cool thing.”

Blog Author: 
Nicholas Frazier

Even in retirement, Peyton Manning is doing his best to try and beat the Patriots.

Peyton Manning visited the Dolphins to offer some advice to Miami QB Ryan Tannehill. (Ron Chenoy/USA Today Sports)

Peyton Manning visited the Dolphins to offer some advice to Miami QB Ryan Tannehill. (Ron Chenoy/USA Today Sports)

Even in retirement, Peyton Manning is doing his best to try and beat the Patriots.

According to a report in the Miami Herald, the former New England nemesis (it feels so weird to add that as a prefix for Manning) recently paid a visit to the Dolphins’ facility to spend some time with Miami quarterback Ryan Tannehill. Tannehill hasn’t had a chance to sit and meet with new Dolphins coach Adam Gase at this point on the calendar and talk about the system. But the fact that Manning played with Gase when he was OC in Denver for two seasons should give Tannehill a good sense of what he might be in for.

“It was really cool,” Tannehill said of he experience to sit down with Manning. “A guy that had his career, the living legend he is, coming off a Super Bowl winning season — it was really cool just to be able to sit and pick his brain about things he’s done in this offense and football things in general: snap counts, things you like, the way you want guys to run routes, little details about the game. We really just got to talk the game, which is something we both love.”

No word yet if Manning had cleared time in his schedule to talk with quarterbacks in Buffalo or North Jersey as of yet.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

The Jonathan Bostic era in New England didn’t last very long.

The Patriots have traded Bosic to the Lions in exchange for a conditional seventh-round pick in the 2017 draft. Acquired from the Bears in a trade late last September, New England gave up a sixth-round pick in the deal.