Tom discussed Peyton's record breaking night.

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady made his weekly appearance with Dennis & Callahan on Monday morning and talked about Peyton Manning as well as the reported infighting going on with

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady made his weekly appearance with Dennis & Callahan on Monday morning and talked about Peyton Manning as well as the reported infighting going on with the Pats‘ next opponent, the Bears. To hear the interview, go to the Dennis & Callahan audio on demand page.

“It’s pretty incredible,” Brady said. “It’s hard to throw touchdown passes, and he’s done it in the last few years, I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s pretty incredible. It’s a great record. It’s incredibly hard to do. He’s been very durable. He’s been obviously consistent, beyond consistent. He’s just a spectacular player.”

Added Brady: “He’s really got great command, he’s really a field general. I think that’s probably the best description, I think that’s kind of the thing that comes to mind when you think about him. He’s got great command out there. He’s been a great player for a long time. He was great with the Colts, and obviously coming to Denver he’s had an incredible run there. It’s been incredible to watch. He makes throwing four touchdown passes look so easy, which of course, as we know, it’s not.”

While Manning has more touchdown passes, Brady leads in Super Bowl victories, with three to Manning’s one. Brady said he never imagined his career would have turned out the way it did.

“Look, Peyton’s had an incredible career,” Brady said. “I’ve been very fortunate. To think I would have the opportunity to do that when I was starting out is crazy. And I’m still part of a great team that has a great opportunity to achieve even more. You don’t think about these things when you’re a kid, certainly I never did. I think I’ve just been so fortunate over the years to be on a great team, great teammates, and throw great relationships and friends in. Certainly the winning, because I think that’s what sets our team apart from a lot of other teams, has been our ability to win on a consistent basis year in and year out, no matter what the circumstances or situations. So to be a part of an organization that that’s what we’ve been able to accomplish has been unbelievable. I’m a lucky guy. I’m a lucky guy, and still going.”

Added Brady: “I wouldn’t change anything that I’ve ever done. I certainly wouldn’t change my career with anybody. I’ve had the opportunity to play in five Super Bowls. To play for one organization, you can’t envision those things. And like I said, it’s still going. I think hopefully the best is yet to come. We’re trying to accomplish and get better, because really this season is the only one we have, is the only thing we can control. To be sitting here 5-2 feels pretty good, too. [We've] had a good thing going.”


Following are more highlights from the conversation. For more Patriots news, visit the team page at weei.com/patriots.

On if Manning had an advantage playing in a domed stadium in Indianapolis for most of his career: “I think controlled environments, like everything, there’s positives, there’s negatives. It’s like anything, if you play golf in a controlled environment, which most of those [professionals] do, you’re going to have great scores. If you play golf and it’s 20 mile-an-hour winds and rainy, your scores aren’t going to be as good. But like everything, both teams play in it, and your competition is against your particular opponent. It’s not against a statistics sheet. I would say that the statistics in great conditions are typically going to be — I would say on average — better than they would be if there was really inclement weather. But look what [Brett] Favre‘s done. He was in Green Bay, which is also pretty tough weather.

“There’s probably only five, eight places I would say weather is a significant factor over the course of a season. We happen to play in one of them. But I think it’s great for team football, which, ultimately, in a team sport, and dealing with wins and losses, when you learn to play in those environments and under those conditions, it can be a great advantage to your team in the playoffs. … Because we’ve had the ability to practice and play in it, I think we’re probably one of the best inclement-weather teams ever to play.”

On if he communicates with Manning regularly: “We exchange text messages from time to time. I sent him a congratulatory note last night, just saying congratulations, because I was sitting up there watching it. But I wouldn’t say we talk. No, I wouldn’t say we talk, I’d say we maybe exchange a few messages from time to time.”

On the Bears, who reportedly had some issues in the locker room after Sunday’s loss to the Dolphins: “Every team is going through different things. It’s tough when you’re losing. I don’t think there’s a lot of good things or positive things to say when you lose. They’ve actually had a pretty tough home record, which I’m sure is tough on them and the home fans. I think they’ve lost all their games at home this year, and they lost their last home game last year. They haven’t been able to play well at home, but they’re still a good team. They’ve still won a lot of games this year, so they’re winning them on the road. Maybe we wish we played them at home. … We’ll get their best. We always seem to get everybody’s best. It’s just the way it is, playing here.”

On the controversy from a few weeks ago, when reports emerged that Brady was upset with his coaches: “The one thing I can really be responsible for is what I say, and not for really what other people may say or think or write. And that’s OK for them to think that. As I said earlier in the conversation here, there’s nothing positive to say when you lose. It’s not like you come out and you say, ‘Wow, we gave it all we could but we just couldn’t get it done.’ That doesn’t sound great. You don’t ever want to criticize your teammates. You don’t really ever want to criticize yourself much other than to say you can do a lot better. A few weeks ago, there’s not a lot of great things to say. We had been dealing with that. We lost to Miami, we lost to KC. … There’s a lot of teams, like I said, like Chicago, when you’re dealing with losses, it can get pretty tough. For our situation, when we were 2-2, yeah, it’s tough, because we lost a big game on a Monday night, it didn’t look good, we were playing some good teams coming up. Fortunately we found a way to turn things around, and that’s what we need to continue to do. I think everybody’s much more happy around Gillette Stadium when we’re winning games. And I’m sure our fans are, too. We as individuals, that’s what we try to do every day, we go in there with a sense of purpose to try to go out there and put our best on the field. And when it’s not our best, we go reevaluate and try to be at our best the next week.”

On wide receiver Percy Harvin, who was traded from the Seahawks to the Jets over the weekend: “He’s a phenomenal player. It’s obviously a big trade. He’s a very explosive player. There’s always a reason why someone’s traded. We had a lot of trades that worked out on our end — Randy Moss and Corey Dillon. Some teams think a player can be more effective in their system. When that guy’s healthy, he’s an explosive player. We saw that, really his whole career. … He’s an exceptional player.”

On the confrontation during Thursday’s game, when offensive lineman Jordan Devey got a penalty for retaliating against a Jets defender who pushed Brady: “Jordan said to me right after, he was like, ‘Man I wasn’t going to let him [do that]. I saw you throw the ball and the guy shoved you,’ and he goes, ‘I wasn’t going to let him get away with that.’ He’s a great guy, and has really stepped in and done a great job for us. That was great to see. I wish the 15-yarder, we didn’t get that, because we have way too many penalties this year. I think we’ve got to be first or second in the league in penalties. so we’ve got to try to figure out a way to eliminate penalties. But being aggressive and playing to the echo of the whistle and protecting your teammates is always supported in football.”

On if he flopped when pushed a second time: “No, I wasn’t trying to draw a penalty. I got hit the first [time] — when I got hit I thought that they were throwing a penalty on the other guy. That’s what I really thought the penalty was. And then he said it was on our guy. I said, ‘But this is the guy that hit me late.’ I was actually a bit surprised.”

On his recent foray into social media, specifically Facebook: “I’ve worked with one of my great friends on it, who’s really done a great job. That’s a pretty important thing to do today. We’ve talked a lot about it over the years, with social media. Really I think the phrase will always be ‘controlling the message’ and also having the opportunity to talk to your fans. I’m a little bit old school in that I’ve never really approached — probably the younger generation, the guys playing now, are much more in tune with that. I’m trying to do a better job with that, certainly over the last six weeks.”

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar

Shortly after Peyton Manning broke Brett Favre‘s record for most career touchdowns Sunday night, a quick video from Patriots quarterback Tom Brady popped up on t

Shortly after Peyton Manning broke Brett Favre‘s record for most career touchdowns Sunday night, a quick video from Patriots quarterback Tom Brady popped up on the Broncos website. A brief message from Brady offered congratulations to Manning on the occasion of his new record, which he set in a thrashing of the Niners.

“Congratulations, Peyton on your touchdown record, a great achievement,” offered Brady. “We’ll see you in a few weeks.”

The Patriots and Broncos meet Nov. 2 in Foxboro.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price
Jay Cutler and the Bears have started the season 3-4. They'll try and improve to .500 when they visit Foxboro on Sunday. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Jay Cutler and the Bears have started the season 3-4. They’ll try and improve to .500 when they visit Foxboro on Sunday. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Here are five things you have to know about the Bears, who will travel to Foxboro on Sunday for a contest with the Patriots.

1. There’s some serious drama going on in Chicago.

In the wake of Sunday’s home loss to the Dolphins — which dropped the Bears record to 3-4 on the season — there were reports of screaming and yelling in the Chicago locker room, with wide receiver Brandon Marshall reportedly at the center of the action. Marshall said after the game that “there should be a lot of frustration” because of the sluggish start, and took exception to a question about a reported confrontation between him and kicker Robbie Gould. “OK, were you in here?” Marshall asked, per ESPN Chicago. “Were you in this locker room? This is a team matter. That has nothing to do with you. There’s a lot of guys this means a lot to. We’re 3-4. We need to play better. That’s unacceptable. That’s unacceptable. Unacceptable; shouldn’t have lost today, shouldn’t be 3-4. [The] offense [has] got to play better. It’s as simple as that.”

2. They have one of the best multidimensional backs in the league in Matt Forte.

The 29-year-old Forte is the driving element of the Chicago offense — after seven games, he leads the Bears in rushing (111 carries, 448 yards, three TDs) and receiving (52 catches, 436 yards, two TDs). The 6-foot-1, 221-pounder, who was a second-round pick out of Tulane in 2008, is the only back in the league who has at least 50 catches and 50 carries through the first seven games of the season, and is second in the league in combined yards from scrimmage with 884. (He trails only DeMarco Murray of the Cowboys with 1,072.) Currently, he’s in the midst of a stretch that includes at least 10 catches in two of his last three games, while he has carried the ball at least 12 times a game every game this season. (For what it’s worth, the Bears have some pretty good depth in the passing game, with four players each having topped 30 catches through seven games, including Forte, tight end Martellus Bennett with 41 and wide receivers Alshon Jeffery with 33 and Marshall with 31.)

3. When the quarterback turns the ball over, it’s bad news for the Bears.

The fact that a team struggles when it turns the ball over isn’t exactly a newsflash, but so far this season, whenever Jay Cutler has turned over the ball, it’s meant a Bears loss. After seven games, the Bears stand at plus-2 (12 takeaways, 10 giveaways) when it comes to takeaway ratio, a perfectly respectable number. However, the 3-4 Bears have lost every game in which Cutler has committed a turnover. The quarterback tossed two interceptions in each of the team’s three previous losses heading into Sunday’s game against the Dolphins. In addition, he committed two more turnovers (an interception and a fumble) against Miami. “After watching film all week, we saw [Cutler] was looking where he threw the ball,” said Miami defensive back Reshad Jones who picked off Cutler on Sunday. “He was always looking at his receivers and never looking off. I tried to take advantage of that and it paid off.” Per ESPN, in each of the team’s four losses this season, Cutler’s turnovers have led to a total of 37 points for the opponent. That doesn’t bode well for Chicago, which is facing a New England team that enters this week’s action best in the league at plus-9, a stat that includes 14 takeaways (seven fumbles, seven interceptions).

4. Rookie cornerback Kyle Fuller is really good.

Fuller, the first-round pick out of Virginia Tech this past spring, has done plenty to warrant Defensive Rookie of the Year consideration over the first half of the season with three interceptions, one of the best totals in the league. (According to the NFL’s official stat service, he became the first player with three interceptions and three forced fumbles in the first six games of a season since former Philadelphia’s Brian Dawkins did it in 1999.) However, the rookie left the third quarter of Sunday’s game against the Dolphins with what the team is calling a hip injury, which could leave his status for this week’s clash with the Patriots in doubt. (In addition, it was later revealed he suffered some sort of hand injury.) The Defensive Rookie of the Month for September, he’s become a vital part of the Chicago defense in a very short span.

5. They are middle-of-the-pack when it comes to getting pressure on the passer, but Willie Young is pretty good at what he does.

The defensive end out of North Carolina State was leading the NFL in sacks with seven going into Sunday Night Football. The 29-year-old Young has flashed a nice consistency when it comes to setting the edge in the run game and also shown an ability to get after the quarterback. Working primarily as a left defensive end over the course of the first seven games, he’s part of a defensive front that includes defensive tackles Jay Ratliff (3.5) and Stephen Paea (3.5 sacks) and defensive ends Jared Allen (1.5 sacks) and Lamarr Houston. The group will provide another stern test for the New England offensive line this week. Oh, and for what it’s worth, Brady and Young have a very brief history together:

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

The Patriots face the Bears next Sunday at Gillette Stadium, and if what happened following Chicago’s loss to the Dolphins is any indication, it could be an interesting afternoon in Foxboro.

The Patriots face the Bears next Sunday at Gillette Stadium, and if what happened following Chicago’s loss to the Dolphins is any indication, it could be an interesting afternoon in Foxboro. In the wake of the Bears’ latest defeat — a 27-14 loss to Miami — reports are that things got pretty heated in the locker room, particularly between wide receiver Brandon Marshall and his teammates.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price
Brandon Browner

Brandon Browner

Patriots cornerback Brandon Browner made his season debut in last Thursday’€™s win over the Jets after missing the first six games — the first four because of a substance abuse suspension and the last two due to an ankle injury.

Browner started at corner opposite Darrelle Revis, but played 41 of a possible 87 defensive snaps, per Pro Football Focus. Playing roughly half the snaps may not be what many thought would happen going in, but following the game he admitted he needed to work on his conditioning and on Sunday Bill Belichick noted Browner has ground to make up on the rest of the league having missed the first six weeks of the season.

“€œWe’€™re almost at the halfway point. Teams have had a ton of practices, a lot of games, a lot of reps, a lot of meetings, a lot of corrections,”€ said Belichick on a conference call. “I’€™d say overall as a league, teams are doing things pretty well, certainly a lot better than they were at the beginning of September. So when you miss that time and everybody else is moving ahead and individually, if a particular player isn’€™t, he has to make that ground up. It’€™s doable but it’€™s still a gap.”

Browner was able to workout with the team and attend meetings at the facility during the first four weeks, but was not able to practice. Although he was able to take mental reps in meetings, there is a lot to be said for playing in actual games, which is something Browner is going through right now trying to get up to speed with the rest of the league.

“[Browner] practiced and did everything with the team all through the spring, all through the offseason program, all though the spring and all through training camp, including the Giants preseason game,” Belichick said. “Then, he wasn’€™t able to participate on the field with the team for those four weeks, but he was able to work out and be in meetings and keep up with the adjustments and game plan things that we put in from week-to-week.

“Now he’€™s had an opportunity to get back on the field and refine those skills — at game speed or practice slash game speed that are important. That’€™s really what it’€™s about for and [Brian] Tyms too, for that matter. No different than if a player coming back from an injury where again, he’€™s around the team. He’€™s able to keep up with the mental part of what’€™s going on in his area, his side of the ball, but he’€™s not able to actually go out there and participate and get his timing and technique work on the field.

“€œThat’€™s the part that takes time and reps to gain confidence and to achieve that high level of execution that we see in the league now at this point in the season.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Brandon Browner

Brandon Browner

Patriots cornerback Brandon Browner made his season debut in last Thursday’€™s win over the Jets after missing the first six games — the first four because of a substance abuse suspension and the last two due to an ankle injury.

Browner started at corner opposite Darrelle Revis, but played 41 of a possible 87 defensive snaps, per Pro Football Focus. Playing roughly half the snaps may not be what many thought would happen going in, but following the game he admitted he needed to work on his conditioning and on Sunday Bill Belichick noted Browner has ground to make up on the rest of the league having missed the first six weeks of the season.

“€œWe’€™re almost at the halfway point. Teams have had a ton of practices, a lot of games, a lot of reps, a lot of meetings, a lot of corrections,”€ said Belichick on a conference call. “I’€™d say overall as a league, teams are doing things pretty well, certainly a lot better than they were at the beginning of September. So when you miss that time and everybody else is moving ahead and individually, if a particular player isn’€™t, he has to make that ground up. It’€™s doable but it’€™s still a gap.”

Browner was able to workout with the team and attend meetings at the facility during the first four weeks, but was not able to practice. Although he was able to take mental reps in meetings, there is a lot to be said for playing in actual games, which is something Browner is going through right now trying to get up to speed with the rest of the league.

“[Browner] practiced and did everything with the team all through the spring, all through the offseason program, all though the spring and all through training camp, including the Giants preseason game,” Belichick said. “Then, he wasn’€™t able to participate on the field with the team for those four weeks, but he was able to work out and be in meetings and keep up with the adjustments and game plan things that we put in from week-to-week.

“Now he’€™s had an opportunity to get back on the field and refine those skills — at game speed or practice slash game speed that are important. That’€™s really what it’€™s about for and [Brian] Tyms too, for that matter. No different than if a player coming back from an injury where again, he’€™s around the team. He’€™s able to keep up with the mental part of what’€™s going on in his area, his side of the ball, but he’€™s not able to actually go out there and participate and get his timing and technique work on the field.

“€œThat’€™s the part that takes time and reps to gain confidence and to achieve that high level of execution that we see in the league now at this point in the season.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable