SAN FRANCISCO - If you were expecting Roger Goodell to change his stance at this point you must not have been paying attention for the last nine months.

At his annual state of the NFL press conference Friday here, he was asked about many factors having to do with competitive balance.



MIKE PETRAGLIA

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While all eyes in the football world are on Super Bowl 50 this weekend, in about a month they will all be focused on a New York court room when the NFL’s appeal of Deflategate will be heard.

The Deflategate case will be back in court next Month. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The Deflategate case will be back in court next Month. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

While all eyes in the football world are on Super Bowl 50 this weekend, in about a month they will all be focused on a New York court room when the NFL’s appeal of Deflategate will be heard.

The NFL is appealing the reversal of Tom Brady‘s four-game suspension for his role in Deflategate.

Goodell, speaking at his state of the league address in San Fransisco Friday, was asked by the New York Daily News’ Gary Meyers if the league does wins the appeal, will Brady’s four-game suspension go back into effect?

Once again, Goodell never directly answered the question saying he isn’t focused on the matter and he doesn’t want to speculate on what may or may not happen.

“This is not an individual player issue. This is about the rights that we negotiated in our collective bargaining agreement,” Goodell told reporters. “We think they are very clear. We think they are important to the league going forward and we disagree with the District judge’s decision. We are appealing that, which is part of the legal process. I am not focused on it right now. I am not going to speculate what we’re going to do depending on the outcome. We’ll let the outcome be dictated by the appeals court. When that happens, we’ll deal with it then.”

The NFL’s appeal of a district court decision vacating the suspension of the quarterback will be heard on March 3.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

A Carolina Panther has a bone to pick with Rodney Harrison, and it’s not loud-mouthed cornerback Josh Norman, but NFL Man of the Year Thomas Davis.

A Carolina Panther has a bone to pick with Rodney Harrison, and it’s not loud-mouthed cornerback Josh Norman, but NFL Man of the Year Thomas Davis.

The Panthers linebacker fired back at the former Patriots safety on Friday in response to Harrison’s contention that if he were to face superstar quarterback Cam Newton in the Super Bowl, he’d “try to take him out.”

“How can you sit there and say you would intentionally try to hurt another player?” Davis tweeted, per the Charlotte Observer. “#NoRespectForTheGame get this clown off the air!!”

Davis didn’t stop there, also ripping Harrison for his 2007 suspension over the use of human growth hormone.

“It’s crazy to think that I actually (used) to look up to a guy like @rodney_harrison even after he got caught cheating!” Davis tweeted.

Davis was responding to comments Harrison made on Wednesday to radio host Dan Patrick, noting that he’d try to injure Newton as a means of winning Super Bowl 50.

“If I was playing against Cam Newton, I would try to take him out,” Harrison said. “I would try to take him out. I would try to hurt him. I would go right at his knees. That’€™s the goal. That’€™s the goal: you want to knock him out. That might be the difference between winning and losing the Super Bowl.”

Blog Author: 
WEEI

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said that the league is aware of the charges involving Peyton Manning and HGH.

Speaking at his annual state of the league press conference in San Fransisco, a question about Deflategate was bound to be asked to Roger Goodell — and it was.

Roger Goodell addressed the collection of PSI information this past year during his state of the league address Friday. (Matthew Emmons/USA TODAY Sports)

Roger Goodell addressed the collection of PSI information this past year during his state of the league address Friday. (Matthew Emmons/USA TODAY Sports)

Speaking at his annual state of the league press conference in San Fransisco, a question about Deflategate was bound to be asked to Roger Goodell — and it was.

CSNNE’s Tom E. Curran asked the commissioner about what he said earlier in the week about the PSI information collected this year being part of spot checks and not a research project and also what constitutes a violation.

Goodell never directly answered Curran’s question, but did repeat what he said earlier in the week by saying the data collected was just to see if there was a violation committed.

“It’s also important that the data that was collected in that was not data for research,” Goodell told reporters. “It was data that collected just to see if there was a violation. Our people never found violations.”

Below is the complete exchange between Curran and Goodell:

Curran: “Earlier this week you said during your “spot checks” that no violations of the PSI rule were found. What actually constitutes a violation now? Did you find anything under 12.5? In the spirit of getting better, doesn’t this whole thing demand transparency in terms of what the numbers were and what the standards will be going forward?”

Goodell: “As you know, at the beginning of the season we made changes to our protocols of how we were going to manage the footballs. That is how they were going to be managed in the moment. They were taken into the stadium right after the game. We have implemented that. As part of that, and it happens in most of our game operations areas, we conduct random checks. We make sure the clubs understand that we will look at that type of procedure and make sure there were no violations of that. We did that, in a very limited basis. We don’t disclose all the specifics on that because it’s meant as a deterrent. If you tell everybody how many times you’re checking, which games you’re checking, it’s not much of a deterrent. It’s a deterrent when they think that game may be being checked.

“It’s also important that the data that was collected in that was not data for research. It was data that collected just to see if there was a violation. Our people never found violations. There was never an accusation of a violation by any other club. And so we’re comfortable that this policy, this rule was followed by our clubs. And we do this across the board on our game operations. There are many areas in our game operations that requires that type of thing.

“Second of all, we did a great deal of research, scientific analysis last year. That was part of the appeal hearing. There was Ted Wells’ report where [he wanted] independent people to study this type of issue. The intent of what we were doing was not a research project, it was to make sure that our policies were followed just like we do in other areas of our game operations.”

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said that the league is aware of the charges involving Peyton Manning and HGH.

“When these allegations first came up, we started our own investigation,” said Goodell.

He added: “When we find the facts, we’ll share them.”

Goodell also contended that the NFL is investigating the allegations involving Manning every bit as stringently as it did Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and Deflategate.

More on this story shortly…

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

According to Madison.com, former Patriots practice squad running back Monte Ball was arrested by Madison, Wisconsin police early Friday morning after he allegedly pushed his girlfriend into a