There was a familiar face walking the halls of Gillette Stadium this week — Randy Moss.

Tom Brady weighed in with his thoughts on the return of LeGarrette Blount to the Patriots Thursday with another tremendous Facebook post.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price
Randy Moss is back in Foxboro this week. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Randy Moss is back in Foxboro this week. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

There was a familiar face walking the halls of Gillette Stadium this week — Randy Moss.

The former Patriots wide receiver is in town to do some TV work for Fox in advance of Sunday’s Patriots-Lions game. Between his work, Moss sat down with Patriots.com reporter Jackie Brittain for an interview for Patriots.com.

Moss talked about a variety of topics, including how he became a member of the Patriots. Moss was traded to the Patriots from the Raiders before Day 2 of the 2007 NFL draft for a fourth-round pick in that draft.

“I’ve said this story time and time again, but I just want people to understand that I am very grateful,” Moss told Brittain. “When I came from Oakland, I was in a dark place. I was in a dark place because I was there for two years, I got traded from the Vikings and things weren’t going well in California. I was away from home, my career wasn’t going the way I wanted it to go.

“I remember I was in Houston, Texas doing the draft and I got a call from Bill Belichick and I thought it was one of my friends playing. I was like, ‘Who is this?’ and he was like, ‘This is Bill Belichick.’ I was like, ‘Man, get real, who is this?’ Coach told me that if I am up here by 10 o’clock next morning, bla, bla, bla, then the trade would go through. Man, I started scrambling.

“When I came up here and became a Patriot I was very thankful, I was very grateful. Mrs. Myra Kraft played a role in it. When she passed away I had to pay my respects to the home, to the family, and when I go see Mr. Kraft he doesn’t call me Randy Moss, he calls me Randy Moss Kraft. They welcomed me into the family and like I said, still to this day it’s just love and anytime you come here you feel the love from the Kraft family.”

When Mrs. Kraft passed away in 2011, Moss flew to Boston for the funeral and signed the condolence book, ‘Randy Moss Kraft.’

Moss spent three-plus seasons as a Patriot, with things not ending so well as Moss was traded in the middle of the 2010 season back to the Vikings. After the first game that season, Moss told the media it would be his last season in New England — apparently upset of the lack of a contract extension offer. Things continued to get worse and finally after Week 4 when Moss didn’t catch a pass for the first time as a Patriot and visibly showing his frustrations, he was traded to Minnesota along with a seventh-round pick for a third-round pick in the 2011 draft.

Despite how the end went, Moss doesn’t hold any grudges or hard feelings and still loves coming back to New England.

“It does, especially when you see familiar faces — meeting with Tom [Brady], seeing Bill [Belichick], seeing Mr. Kraft,” said Moss. “There’s a lot of memories that I have here. I just told Bill, there is a special place in my heart for the New England Patriots.”

 

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Running back LeGarrette Blount took to Twitter Thursday afternoon to express his feelings about returning to the Patriots. (The veteran, who spent the 2013 season in New England, was released earlier in the week by the Steelers. He was signed by the Patriots on Thursday.)

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

When it comes to playing at Gillette Stadium, Detroit defensive back Glover Quin said it’s tough for road teams to get thrown by the occasionally rural environment of Southeastern Massachusetts.

Detroit defensive back Glover Quin sounds like he's a little thrown when it comes to playing in Foxboro. (Leon Halip/Getty Images)

Detroit defensive back Glover Quin sounds like he’s a little thrown when it comes to playing in Foxboro. (Leon Halip/Getty Images)

When it comes to playing at Gillette Stadium, Detroit defensive back Glover Quin said it’s tough for road teams to get thrown by the occasionally rural environment of Southeastern Massachusetts.

“Foxboro’s a weird place,” Quin told the Detroit Free-Press this week. “You go up there and you’re in a hotel and then you got to drive through like back woods to get there and then all of a sudden a stadium appears like it seems like in people’s backyard and it’s like, just a weird place out there. And they love it. They play great there. I’ve never won there. I’ve played there three or four times, I’ve never won there. It’s tough to win there.

“I just know you’re going through like the back woods, and you’re just like, ‘Oh my God, what am I going to?’ And then all of a sudden it’s like you see like a little trailer park or something like that, and then all of a sudden you see the stadium, you’re like ‘Whoa, right in the backyard?'” Quin added. “It’s weird out there. It’s weird out there, I can’t even lie.”

Quin said a big reason why the Patriots have done so well at home is because of a smart fan base that knows when to make noise and when it be quiet.

“That the crowd is so silent on offense and Tom Brady is able to really control the offense as opposed to having to signal a lot,” Quin said. “Look at a TV copy of a home game from New England and just listen, you can hear everything that he’s saying.”

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

The league announced Thursday that Sunday’s game between the Bills and Jets won’t be played in Buffalo this weekend because of the massive snowstorm that has blanketed parts of upstate New York.

According to the NFL, the league is in the process of finding a suitable alternate venue for the game.

“Due to public safety concerns in light of the ongoing weather emergency in Western New York, Sunday’s Jets-Bills game will not be played in Buffalo,” NFL spokesman Michael Signora said in a statement. “We are in the process of rescheduling and relocating the game as part of Week 12. We will provide additional information as soon as possible.

“We have been in contact with the public authorities and we realize the importance of all available public safety resources being available for the community at this difficult time. We are also in discussions with the team and the Red Cross on ways the NFL can support the community through this weather disaster.”

Detroit and Washington reportedly loom as possible replacement sites.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

The Patriots practiced outside in the cold on the grass fields behind Gillette Stadium on Thursday in advance of Sunday’s game with the Lions. Chandler Jones (hip), Dominique Easley (knee) and Cameron Fleming (finger/ankle) all missed the session.

Dominique Easley

Dominique Easley

The Patriots practiced outside in the cold on the grass fields behind Gillette Stadium on Thursday in advance of Sunday’s game with the Lions. Chandler Jones (hip), Dominique Easley (knee) and Cameron Fleming (finger/ankle) all missed the session.

Jones hasn’t practiced since suffering the hip injury in Week 7, while Fleming didn’t practice Wednesday after leaving late in last Sunday’s game against the Colts with an ankle injury. It was Fleming’s first action since suffering a finger injury Week 4 against Kansas City, which he is still said to be dealing with. Easley missed the practice after being limited on Wednesday. It is worth noting that Wednesday’s practice was a walkthrough and Thursday’s was held in full pads.

Offensive lineman Ryan Wendell (knee) was removed from the injury report.

On a side note, Sealver Siliga was spotted at Wednesday’s walkthrough, but his 21-day window of coming off short-term injured reserve has not started yet.

For the Lions, running back Joique Bell was limited in practice after not practicing at all on Wednesday. Wide receiver Calvin Johnson and defensive lineman Nick Fairley once again did not practice.

Here is the complete Patriots practice report:

Did not practice

DL Dominique Easley (knee)
OL Cameron Fleming (finger/ankle)
DE Chandler Jones (hip)

Limited participation

OL Marcus Cannon (hip)
S Nate Ebner (finger)
WR Julian Edelman (thigh)

Full participation

QB Tom Brady (ankle)

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
Tony Corrente will work as the lead official for Sunday's Patriots-Lions game. (Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

Tony Corrente will work as the lead official for Sunday’s Patriots-Lions game. (Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

FOXBORO — Tony Corrente has been assigned to work the Sunday game between the Patriots and Lions at Gillette Stadium, according to FootballZebras.com. Sunday will mark the second Patriots game of the season for Corrente, a veteran official who also served as the lead referee for the Patriots-Vikings game in Minnesota on Sept. 14.

Here’€™s a look at who has worked as the lead official for each New England game this year, and the corresponding penalties for each game, not counting the flags that were offset or declined.

Sept. 7 at Miami: Walt Anderson –€” 9 penalties, 100 yards (Dolphins –€” 4 penalties, 26 yards)
Sept. 14 at Minnesota: Tony Corrente –€” 15 penalties, 163 yards (Vikings — 7 penalties, 58 yards)
Sept. 21 vs. Oakland: Pete Morelli — 6 penalties, 59 yards (Raiders –€” 6 penalties, 49 yards)
Sept. 29 at Kansas City: John Parry –€” 3 penalties, 30 yards (Chiefs –€” 4 penalties, 35 yards)
Oct. 5 vs. Cincinnati: Jerome Boger — 12 penalties, 114 yards (Bengals –€” 4 penalties, 37 yards)
Oct. 12 at Buffalo: Walt Coleman –€” 9 penalties, 60 yards (Bills –€” 8 penalties, 107 yards)
Oct. 16 vs. Jets: Bill Leavy –€” 9 penalties, 64 yards (Jets –€” 7 penalties, 70 yards)
Oct. 23 vs. Bears: Brad Allen –” 7 penalties, 38 yards (Bears –€” 5 penalties, 41 yards)
Nov. 2 vs. Denver: Walt Anderson — 9 penalties, 71 yards (Broncos –€” 10 penalties, 72 yards)
Nov. 16 at Indy: Pete Morelli — 5 penalties, 53 yards (Colts — 4 penalties, 27 yards)
Nov. 23 vs. Lions: Tony Corrente

For more on Corrente’s work as an official, check out his page at Pro Football Reference. And for all of this week’€™s officiating assignments, check out Football Zebras.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price