Plenty of young football players who make the NFL can usually point to a career-defining moment in high school, a singular event where they cement their status as a future pro.



On a team that’s traditionally been stocked with veterans, players right out of college haven’t been asked to make sizable contributions in New England -- last year’s first-round pick Jerod Mayo was the exception rather than the rule.



Where to start? How about the seven deals? The trade of veteran cornerback and return man Ellis Hobbs to Philadelphia? Or the fact that in a Bill Belichick draft, the Patriots took just as many long snappers as they did linebackers?



It doesn't take a football genius or a math major to figure out where the Patriots have been hurting the last few years. The only one who didn't seem to get it was Ellis Hobbs, and how did that work out for him?
 



MICHAEL FELGER

BIO | ARCHIVE


Well, no one can accuse Bill Belichick of being wasteful.



Tom Petty was right: The waiting is the hardest part.



1. Detroit. QB Matthew Stafford, Georgia. The only reason the Lions would pass on Stafford is if they had questions about his signability. If they can come to an agreement on the money, there’s no reason to think Stafford won’t go to the Lions.



I have an admission to make.



MICHAEL FELGER

BIO | ARCHIVE


Bill Belichick and the Patriots always execute deals on draft weekend. Some of them are seismic in nature -- Randy Moss and Drew Bledsoe, for example.



Predicting what the Patriots will do in the NFL Draft the last few years has been a difficult task -- they’re famous for keeping their cards close to the vest, and the annual two-day team-building exercise in April is no exception.