Patriots fans will be taking time out of their Memorial Day weekend to show their support for their embattled superstar quarterback.

Tom Brady will be getting support from Patriots fans on Sunday at Gillette Stadium. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Tom Brady will be getting support from Patriots fans on Sunday at Gillette Stadium. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

Patriots fans will be taking time out of their Memorial Day weekend to show their support for their embattled superstar quarterback.

According to a Facebook fan page, fans will be holding a rally in support of Tom Brady at Gillette Stadium on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event, according to a post on the page, describes the event as a “peaceful rally to protest the unjust football arrest of half God half man Tom Brady.”

The rally takes place at Patriot Place Parking Lot 4, in the general area of the Patriots Pro Shop and Hall at Patriot Place, which houses the team’s hall of fame.

Brady has been suspended for the first four games of next season by the NFL for his role in Deflategate. Brady has appealed the suspension through the Players Association, which requested last week that league commissioner Roger Goodell recuse himself from hearing the appeal. Goodell’s lawyers have suggested he deny the union’s request.

Patriots fans across New England and the country have rallied around Brady, whom they feel has been an unfair target of the probe by Ted Wells and the NFL to look into why footballs were under inflated in the first half of the AFC championship game against the Colts.

This week at Fenway Park, fans have broken out in spontaneous cheers of “Free Tom Brady,” including Friday night when the team was down 12-5 in the 8th inning of a loss to the Los Angeles Angels.

A "Free Tom Brady" rally has been organized for Sunday on Facebook. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

A “Free Tom Brady” rally has been organized for Sunday on Facebook. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

As of Saturday afternoon, nearly 250 people had confirmed via the Facebook page that they were planning to attend. Fans are also encouraged to wear Tom Brady jerseys.

One fan pledged her support before passing away. Patricia M. Shong, who died Monday at 72, told people she believed in Brady before passing away, a fact that was reflected in her obituary in the Auburn, Mass., Daily.

“Patricia was known for being an avid reader which all who knew her can attest to based on her mini home library. She especially loved spending time with her family. She would also like us to set the record straight for her: Brady is innocent!!”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the NFL rejected the NFLPA motion that Roger Goodell recuse himself from Tom Brady‘s appeal.

This means Goodell will hear Brady’s appeal, which goes against what Brady and the NFLPA wanted. The date for the appeal reportedly hasn’t been set.

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the NFL rejected the NFLPA Motion that Roger Goodell recuse himself from Tom Brady‘s appeal.

This means Goodell will hear Brady’s appeal, which goes against what Brady and the NFLPA wanted. The date for the appeal reportedly hasn’t been set.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable

Those looking for a date for Tom Brady‘s appeal hearing will need to wait a little longer.

According to Pro Football Talk, the league office says no date has been set for the hearing. The NFLPA officially filed the appeal last Thursday, May 14.

Speaking for the first time since the release of the Wells Report and the subsequent punishments meted out to the Patriots, NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith hammered back at the league Friday afternoon, questioning whether or not Ted Wells was truly autonomous in his work.

Those looking for a date for Tom Brady‘s appeal hearing will need to wait a little longer.

According to Pro Football Talk, the league office says no date has been set for the hearing. The NFLPA officially filed the appeal last Thursday, May 14.

For more Patriots news, visit weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Ryan Hannable
NFLPA chief DeMaurice Smith came out against the Wells Report Friday. (Rob Carr/Getty Images)

NFLPA chief DeMaurice Smith came out against the Wells Report Friday. (Rob Carr/Getty Images)

Speaking for the first time since the release of the Wells Report and the subsequent punishments meted out to the Patriots, NFLPA Eexecutive Director De Maurice Smith hammered back at the league Friday afternoon, questioning whether or not Wells was truly autonomous in his work.

“You can’t really have credibility just because you slap the word independent on a piece of paper,” Smith told ESPN.

He added: “I think the Wells Report delivered exactly what the client wanted.”

Smith also noted some of the inconsistencies in the report, saying that one part of the document credits the memory of referee Walt Anderson, while another section questions his recollection. He also took issue with the way it was written.

“The first thing that jumps out at you about the report is how negotiated the language is,” he said.

Smith said he does not know if there is some sort of agreement in place between commissioner Roger Goodell and Patriots owner Bob Kraft that included Kraft dropping his fight against in the league in exchange for Goodell reducing or eliminating the suspension of Brady. While Brady’s appeal is pending, a report from Pro Football Talk on Friday indicated that no date had been set for that meeting.

For more Patriots news, check out weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Christopher Price

ESPN NFL analyst Bill Polian, a frequent critic of the Patriots, joined the Middays with MFB crew on Friday to discuss Deflategate and how the Patriots are perceived around the NFL. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

ESPN NFL analyst Bill Polian, a frequent critic of the Patriots, joined the Middays with MFB crew on Friday to discuss Deflategate and how the Patriots are perceived around the NFL. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

Polian, a former longtime Colts executive, had high praise for Robert Kraft, who this week announced the Patriots would not appeal their punishment for Deflategate.

“I think it’s just typical of Mr. Kraft. He’s always been the NFL’s leading citizen. He’s a leader in every way. He’s a guy who thinks about the league first, last and always,” Polian said. “Anybody else you might be a little bit surprised by the reaction, but knowing Mr. Kraft, I’m not surprised at all. He did what was best for the league rather than his own franchise.”

As for speculation that Kraft gave in to other owners, Polian said that’s unlikely due to the Patriots owner’s standing.

“No, I don’t think so. He’s one of the leading owners in the league. There’s no one going to pressure him,” Polian said. “The bottom line is he looked at the issues and recognized that while he probably would have liked things to turn out better for the Patriots in the long run, what’s important for the league is what ultimately counts. That attitude was called ‘league think,’ that phrase created, at least to my knowledge, by Pete Rozelle. And Mr. Kraft follows it to the letter.”

Polian said the issue is not about what did or did not happen, but whether the commissioner has the right to do what he did.

“It wasn’t about the argument,” Polian said. “At this point it isn’t about the Patriots or Tom Brady, even. It’s about the commissioner’s right to handle unilaterally — and in conjunction with the rights given him in the collective bargaining agreement since 1968, and tradition dating all the way back to the Black Sox in 1919, with Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the first commissioner of baseball. The commissioner has the right to handle the integrity of the game. It is his responsibility. And that responsibility extends not only to the owners and players and coaches and general managers and staff people, but to the fans as well. Because if the integrity of the game is called into question in any way, it affects the overall health of the game and standing of the game in society.

“So to take that from the commissioner is an absolutely bad precedent. And of course Round 2 of that takes place in Tom Brady‘s grievance hearing. But the fact that Mr. Kraft went ahead and accepted the commissioner’s decision is in line with the longstanding tradition of the league and is what is best for the league in the long run.”

Many Patriots fans have expressed their disappointment with Kraft’s decision to give up the fight. Polian said those fans should appreciate what Kraft has done and continues to do.

“I would say they’re lucky to have him as an owner, just as the NFL is lucky to have him as an owner,” Polian said. “He’s doing what’s best for the league in the long run. It isn’t about this particular issue at this point in time. It’s about what’s good for the league in the long run. That’s what outstanding owners do, it’s what commissioners do, it’s what outstanding coaches and general managers do. At some point in time you have to take off your individual team hat and put on your league hat. That’s what protecting the shield is called.”

Regarding Brady’s four-game suspension, Polian pointed to the quarterback’s refusal to cooperate, noting that NFL investigator Ted Wells gave Brady’s agent, Don Yee, the opportunity to forward only relevant texts from Brady’s cell phone, but Yee refused.

“I think many fans missed this: As part of the policy that the commissioner enunciated back in 2007 or 2008, after Spygate, he set the standard of proof, which has been talked about a lot, and in addition to that he made clear that every single person in the league had a responsibility to cooperate with any investigation that the league undertook. By any standard, Tom and his attorney were not cooperative,” Polian said. “I don’t have any doubt that they took that into consideration when they assessed the penalty.”

Polian further noted that the league does not need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Brady cheated, only that it was more likely than not — which is the conclusion of the Wells Report.

“The investigation was conducted under a standard set by the commissioner back in 2008,” Polian said. “Everybody in the league knows it. Everybody in the league understands it.”

Polian added that based on the standard set by the NFL, the punishment was reasonable.

“I thought given the non-cooperation part of it — which, again, I understand that fans do not understand that, [but] people in the league do — I thought it was pretty fair,” he said.

For more Patriots news, visit the team page at weei.com/patriots.

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar