Lakers guard Ron Artest weighed in on the Heat's crying saga by saying it's OK to let out your emotions. "In my psychology sessions, I sometimes cry with my therapist," he said in an interview on NBA TV. "We cry and hug each other; hold each other and talk. I think it’s a good thing to cry and let your emotions out rather than keep it inside." Artest added that he hoped someone hugged the unidentified Heat players who cried — according to Miami coach Erik Spoelstra, who later tried to change his story — after Sunday's loss to the Bulls.

Two high school hockey coaches were suspended from their Canadian team for deliberately losing a game — pulling their goalie when up by a goal — to avoid having to play a tougher team in the next round of a tournament, creating a debate about the purpose of youth sports.

 

Tears were shed in the Heat locker room Sunday after another disappointing loss, according to Miami coach Erik Spoelstra. "This is painful for every single one of us to go through this, there are couple of guys crying in the locker room right now, it is not a matter of want," Spoelstra said after his team's 87-86 home loss to the Bulls, which featured LeBron James again missing a potential game-winning shot.

 

Chris Nowinski, a formal Harvard football player and professional wrestler who now serves as president of the Sports Legacy Institute and co-director of Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, joined the Dennis & Callahan show Friday morning to talk about problems with concussions in sports and their long-term effects.

 

A few high school sports stories headline Friday's Morning Mashup. In Michigan, a basketball player collapsed and died after celebrating his game-winning shot that capped an undefeated regular season. In New York, Manny Ramirez' former high school coach is planning legal action after being suspended for the season for violating the league's prohibition on recruiting. In Southern California, two girls are set to become the first females to start against each other on the mound in a high school varsity baseball game.

Longtime NHL tough guy Bob Probert, who died last July of heart failure at the age of 45, had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the degenerative brain disease that has afflicted a number of NFL players. Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy made the diagnosis this week after examining Probert's brain tissue. "In my heart of hearts, I don’t believe fighting is what did this to Bob," Probert's widow, Dani, told The New York Times. "It was hockey — all the checking and hits, things like that."

 

Boston attorney Harry Manion joined the Dennis & Callahan show Wednesday morning to talk about high-profile cases in the sports world.

 

Former baseball stars Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds are facing trials this year. Manion said the cases are at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of the players' prospects.

 

Forbes magazine has a list of the top 10 most miserable sports cities in America, which includes factors such as heartbreaking playoff defeats and losing franchises to other cities, Seattle heads the list, followed closely by Atlanta. Phoenix, Buffalo and San Diego round out the top five.

 

Also in the news, Clippers owner Donald Sterling, who does not have a stellar reputation when it comes to his behavior toward minorities, saw his latest attempt at redemption come back to embarrass him with a Black History Month tribute that managed to be offensive to some.

Steelers receiver Hines Ward is the latest athlete to sign up for ABC's "Dancing With the Stars." The list of contestants was released Monday. As part of the show's 12th season, Ward will compete against former welterweight boxing champion Ray Leonard and ex-USC basketball player (and rap star/actor) Romeo, among others.

 

Read more about that story and others, plus check out videos, trivia and more, at Tuesday's Morning Mashup.

ESPN writer Howard Bryant pleaded not guilty to charges of domestic assault and resisting arrest during a Monday appearance in district court in the Western Massachusetts town of Greenfield. He was released on personal recognizance.