The mass lay offs at ESPN continue for a second day. And are you watching Chris Sale take on the Yankees or the NFL draft tonight?

[0:18:28] ... if it's a different level yet to be yes yes I've seen Tom Brady go to when he doesn't sign isn't surprised meets presently still don't. And outstanding but everything if they wanna watch this guy. ...
[0:19:29] ... be African it and you'll be active William LA accomplished on the ice hockey city near you you an average of sitting around waiting you sit near ought to be doing drafting in between but this ...
[0:21:12] ... NFL has already told. You can't cheat anymore if you do your fire fighters who have. I'm saying you can't leak out any of these is picks which they've done in the past. I love and ...
[0:26:41] ... in this money helps create that nobody will be going to the Tom Brady foundation that's true I don't believe it's okay it's only an apple or cut. Spitzer you know exactly where the money's going ...






The Boston Herald’s Steve Buckley announced he was gay in a column seven years ago. But he says Bill Simmons tried to out him a decade earlier.

One more win for the C's means a ticket to the second round. But should we be feeling confident? The draft starts tonight and the Patriots don't seem to have any intention of participating in the first few rounds.
Steve Buckley announced he was gay in 2011. (Photo provided)

Steve Buckley announced he was gay in 2011. (Photo provided)

The Boston Herald’s Steve Buckley announced he was gay in a column seven years ago. But he says Bill Simmons tried to out him a decade earlier.

During the debut episode of WEEI’s latest podcast, “Two Outs with Steve Buckley and Alex Reimer,” the longtime sports scribe describes his coming out process. While Buckley wasn’t publicly out until 2011, he says he didn’t make much of an effort to hide his sexuality when around friends and some co-workers.

Simmons, who was writing for the defunct AOL Digital Cities in the late 1990s and early 2000s, often wrote acerbic commentary about Boston sports media members. During that time period, Buckley says Simmons made several thinly veiled references to his sexuality on his blog. Most of Simmons’ work for Digital Cities, including the articles in question, have been expunged.

“I’ve never really talked about this before, but Bill, during that period, made several references to my sexual orientation,” Buckley said. “‘Oh, he’s the most popular sports writer in Provincetown’ –– ‘wink’ ‘wink.'”

Buckley says the barbs “devastated” him and caused some angst. He was planning on coming out in 2003, but then his mother passed away, causing him to push the announcement back. When he penned his column eight years later, Buckley says he decided to not hold any grudges.

“I made a decision when I came out –– ‘Blood is a big expense,’ to use a line from the Godfather,” he said. “I wasn’t going to go carrying baggage for the rest of my life. If I saw Bill right now, I would talk to him about it. … I wanted to prevent the next Bill Simmons from trying to out me. So I dealt with it, and I moved on.”

When Buckley did come out, Simmons recorded a podcast with LZ Granderson, an openly gay sportswriter for ESPN. In it, Simmons seemed unimpressed with the timing of Buckley’s announcement.

“In 2011, is it too little to come out and write a column that says, ‘I’m gay?,'” he asked.

After the column was published, Buckley says he read some criticism from members of the LGBTQ community who felt he was exploiting the work of activists who participated in the Stonewall Riots and other seminal moments in LGBTQ history. He explains the standard-bearers of the gay rights movement laid the groundwork for him to come out.

“Someone wrote a letter to the editor in a paper that someone sent me,” Buckley said. “The basic message was, there were people back in the 60’s and 70’s and the Stonewall Riots, fighting the good fight, the AIDS quote and all of that, and they did all of the heavy lifting and then I just kind of swooped in and took advantage of all of that. Those were the real heroes. To which I say, ‘absolutely.’ But here’s why they miss the point: All of those noble people, beginning with the people who fought the police at Stonewall back in ’69, why did they do it? They did it so I could come out. They did it for me.”

Blog Author: 
WEEI
Following the Sox loss to the Yankees, Lou comes out swinging on managers and writers alike.

ESPN gutted its MLB coverage Wednesday, laying off several prominent reporters and analysts.

 NY Post Sports — Grayson Murray’s open book policy on social media took a decidedly creepy turn Wednesday night.

The 23-year-old golfer and part-time model chaser, after admitting he “had a couple drinks,” fired off an inappropriate tweet to a young female fan after she posed the age-old question, “Why does everyone hate on @GraysonMurray?”

“Idk but I hate the fact you are in high school. You are pretty,” Murray replied in the since-deleted tweet, which had been captured.

The fan in question, a Dallas-based high schooler who had recently shared photos from her prom, responded to Murray’s remarks with, “Well thanks!”

Murray returned to Twitter on Thursday morning, switching the subject matter from personal to professional.

I cringed out loud when I saw this it’s so skeevy.

But I also laughed out loud. It’s quite a ballsy move and it’s kind of funny that he tweeted this as a quote tweet and not a reply where it’s at least a little more private. 

At least Murray did answer this girl’s question of why everyone hates on him. Certainly clears that up.

Here’s the first tweet he sent after he deleted the tweet in question: 

Way to subtly pivot to tweeting like a professional person and expect us to forget you just hit on a high-schooler. While this technique is frequently used, it is rarely effective. Screenshots are forever, as they say, so Murray’s clever attempt to distract us by tweeting about golf has failed.

Blog Author: 
Lucy Burdge
Karl Ravech (right) is reportedly going to see his role at ESPN significantly reduced. (Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports)

Karl Ravech (right) is reportedly going to see his role at ESPN significantly reduced. (Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports)

ESPN gutted its MLB coverage Wednesday, laying off several prominent reporters and analysts. As a result, the WorldWide Leader is now looking towards the outside in an effort to beef up its baseball programming.

In a press release, ESPN announced it’s partnering with MLB Network to air “Intentional Talk,” the slap-and-tickle fest hosted by Chris Rose and Kevin Millar. The program will run from 4:00-5:00 p.m. on ESPN2 beginning next week.

The collaboration between ESPN and MLB Network isn’t a surprise, given Disney’s 33 percent stake in MLB Advanced Media. It appears as if ESPN is dramatically cutting down on its original MLB studio programming, with “Baseball Tonight” mainstays such as Dallas Braden, Doug Glanville and Raul Ibanez receiving their walking papers Wednesday. The Hollywood Reporter says “Baseball Tonight” host Karl Ravech is going to see his role significantly reduced.

While ESPN pays MLB $700 million annually to broadcast games, it’s apparent baseball coverage is no longer a priority in Bristol. That’s likely a reflection on MLB’s lessened national standing. “Sunday Night Baseball,” once a marquee property, continues to see its ratings flounder in comparison to the network’s other major telecasts.

MLB will still be covered more prominently than the NHL –– ESPN canned three hockey reporters this week –– but the gap is closing.

Blog Author: 
Alex Reimer
We waste no time picking apart Jimmy Butler and the Bulls after dropping a pivotal Game 5 to the Celtics. Butler's poor performance last night might have Glenn thinking twice about the C's pursuing Jimmy this off season...
Kirk gives us today's headlines: John Kerry is switching islands. Jesse Watters makes odd comment about Ivanka Trump. Marty Walsh comments on the Boston 2024 book. Pre-NFL Draft talk.