FOXBORO — Terrance Knighton is busy learning the playbook for the Patriots in their spring practices, workouts and OTAs.

But when he’s not in the playbook, he’s planning out different ways of recruiting Kevin Durant to the Celtics.

Terrance Knighton isn't giving up on Kevin Durant coming to Boston. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

Terrance Knighton isn’t giving up on Kevin Durant coming to Boston. (Mike Petraglia/WEEI.com)

FOXBORO — Terrance Knighton is busy learning the playbook for the Patriots in their spring practices, workouts and OTAs.

But when he’s not in the playbook, he’s planning out different ways of recruiting Kevin Durant to the Celtics.

Apparently, Knighton didn’t hear Jackie MacMullan on OM&F on Tuesday, throwing cold water on the idea of Durant actually coming to Boston.

She said Celtics fans “can forget about Durant” leaving Oklahoma City for Boston.

That’s not going to keep the big nose tackle, a long-time Celtics fan from Hartford, from trying. He is close friends with the Thunder superstar.

“I’m leaving him alone right now, letting him finished it up. I love how he’s playing. I hope he wins it. I kind of hope he doesn’t,” Knighton said of Durant, who entered Thursday’s Game 5 in Oakland leading Steph Curry and the Warriors, 3 games to 1.

“As soon as the season’s over, if he’s hoisting the trophy or not, I’ll definitely be texting him every day, calling him, flying down to [Oklahoma City]. I’ll be in his ear a lot, trust me.”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

As the days pass leading up to June’s NBA Draft, we want to encourage the debate regarding what the Celtics should do with the No. 3 overall pick. In that spirit, we present, “Celtics choice.”

Today: Using the No. 3 pick to trade for Cavaliers forward Kevin Love or Pacers forward Paul George.

The case for Love

May 25, 2016; Cleveland, OH, USA; Cleveland Cavaliers forward Kevin Love (0) shoots over Toronto Raptors forward Luis Scola (4) during the second half in game five of the Eastern conference finals of the NBA Playoffs at Quicken Loans Arena. The Cavs won 116-78. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

Cavaliers forward Kevin Love (0) shoots over Toronto Raptors forward Luis Scola (4) in the playoffs. (Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports)

At 27, one of the best pure scoring forwards in the game is in his prime. Last July, Love re-signed with the Cavaliers on a 5-year, $113 million max deal. He has four years left on it. Returning from shoulder surgery, he scored 27 of his season-high 34 points in the first half of the Cavaliers’ win over the Magic in November. On Jan. 29, 2016, he had his best game since November 23, scoring 29 points on 9-of-19 shooting in a win over the Detroit Pistons. That game also marked the first time all season that Love, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving each reached 20 points in a game. He helped the Cavaliers finished the regular season as the first seed in the East with a 57–25 record. For the second straight season, he was the perfect complement to James and Irving, after overcoming his shoulder problems that started with Kelly Olynyk in the first round of the ’15 playoffs. He finished this season averaging 16 points and 9.9 rebounds a game. In the first round of the playoffs, Love recorded playoff career highs with 28 points and 13 rebounds in a Game 1 win over the Pistons.

The case against Love

Consistency. Love can have games where he shows exactly why he’s paid so handsomely. He can also go long stretches where his production drops way off. In Games 3 and 4 against the Raptors, both losses, Love was 5-for-23 with 13 points total in the two games. Starting with a Christmas Day loss at Golden State, he went a full month and scored just 20 points once in 17 games. His numbers have dropped off in Cleveland. The drop from 26 points per game to 16 a game the last two seasons in Cleveland is understandable with LeBron and Irving scoring so much. But the falloff in rebounding is more alarming, as he’s gone from a league-leading 15.4 rebounds a game in Minnesota in 2011-12 to 9.9 rebounds per game in Cleveland. Danny Ainge has always like long, athletic shooters from the wing and has been looking for one but the question is whether Love is really worth the $113 million?

The case for George

Apr 29, 2016; Indianapolis, IN, USA; Indiana Pacers forward Paul George (13) shoots the ball in front of Toronto Raptors forward Patrick Patterson (54) during the second half in game six of the first round of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. The Pacers won 101-83. Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Pacers forward Paul George (13) shoots the ball in front of Toronto Raptors forward Patrick Patterson (54) in the playoffs. (Brian Spurlock/USA Today Sports)

Has emerged as one of the most underrated and best all-around player in the league. He averaged a career-best 23.1 points per game this season, his first full season back from his gruesome compound fractures in his lower right leg at the FIBA Basketball World Cup in August of 2014. He has had some of his best games against the best, 45 points in a loss to Oklahoma City and 35 points in a Game 5 loss at Toronto in the playoffs. He averaged 27.3 points for the Pacers in the 7-game loss to the Raptors. He is a three-time NBA All-Star and has been named twice to the All-NBA team and the NBA All-Defensive team. He’s got three years left on a 5-year, $91.5 million contract.

The case against George

Simply put, the Pacers and Larry Bird would ask a king’s ransom, and rightly so for this prize. It would likely take all three first-round picks and something else on the current roster like Avery Bradley for the Pacers to even consider this.

The verdict

George, a year younger than Love at 26, can do more and is a better all-around player. As much as Ainge has always admired the skills of Love, George is a far better value for the money.

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Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

Celtics guard Avery Bradley has always been known as one of the best defenders in the NBA, and now he’s being recognized for it.

The Celtics had a very good season and a good part of it was based on their improved defensive effort. 

Avery Bradley led that effort as a starter and, on Wednesday, was named to the NBA’s all-defensive first team by pro basketball media members.

The Celtics were slotted the third overall pick in this year’s NBA draft last week, which meant to most NBA scouts and fans that Boston would miss out on the draft’s top two prospects, LSU power forward Ben Simmons and Duke forward Brandon Ingram.

Avery Bradley

Avery Bradley

The Celtics had a very good season and a good part of it was based on their improved defensive effort. 

Avery Bradley led that effort as a starter and, on Wednesday, was named to the NBA’s all-defensive first team by pro basketball media members.

Behind Bradley, the Celtics finished tied with the Clippers and Warriors for fourth in the NBA in defensive rating. Bradley was also the top finisher among guards in the Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year voting (sixth place overall). He averaged a career-high 1.54 steals for the Celtics in their breakout 48-win season under third-year coach Brad Stevens. 

Jae Crowder just missed a selection on the second team, finishing with 47 points, including three first-team votes. Marcus Smart, who often played alongside Bradley in the backcourt, finished with seven points and two first-team votes. 

Kawhi Leonard of the Spurs won the Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year award and finished with the most votes. 

2015-16 NBA ALL-DEFENSIVE FIRST TEAM

Player (Team), 1st Team Votes, 2nd Team Votes, Total

Kawhi Leonard (San Antonio), 130, –, 260

Draymond Green (Golden State), 123, 5, 251

DeAndre Jordan (L.A. Clippers), 47, 43, 137

Avery Bradley (Boston), 62, 25, 149

Chris Paul (L.A. Clippers), 59, 30, 148

2015-16 NBA ALL-DEFENSIVE SECOND TEAM

Player (Team), 1st Team Votes, 2nd Team Votes, Total

Paul Millsap (Atlanta), 11, 75, 97

Paul George (Indiana), 5 , 38, 48

Hassan Whiteside (Miami), 44, 38, 126

Tony Allen (Memphis), 44, 33, 121

Jimmy Butler (Chicago), 18, 26 , 62

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

In the days leading up to June’s NBA draft, we want to encourage debate regarding what the Celtics should do with the No. 3 overall pick. In that spirit, we present, “Celtics choice.”

Today: Using the No. 3 pick on Providence College point guard Kris Dunn or keeping promising third-year player Marcus Smart

The case for Dunn

See if this sounds familiar: the Providence guard is powerfully built and physically gifted for his position, with the ability to defend multiple positions and a toughness NBA GMs like Danny Ainge love. If that sounds like Smart, it’s because Dunn shares many characteristics with the Celtics guard. Where he separates, however, is on the offensive side of the ball. Dunn is a better ball handler, passer, and scorer than Smart. At 6-foot-4, 205 pounds and with a 6-9 wingspan, Dunn possesses tremendous defensive instincts and court vision. He’s a terror in the open court and can finish at the rim authoritatively with either hand. He’s a true playmaking point guard who can also score (37.2 percent on 3-pointers). Just call him Smart 2.0.

The case against Dunn

In the delicate ecosystem of an NBA locker room, one malcontent can lead to disaster, and it’s fair to question Dunn’s fit when his agents are already suggesting he won’t play for a team — including the Celtics — with an established point guard. They can’t stop anyone from drafting him, but they can make it more difficult by withholding Dunn’s medicals, which is what Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski says they intend to do. This is an issue because Dunn required two shoulder surgeries during his PC career and teams will want a look before committing to him as their point guard of the future. On the court, there’s also the question of Dunn’s stroke — his inconsistent jumper includes a lot of moving parts — and his occasionally sloppy and reckless ball-handling.

The case for Smart

We have a much better idea of what type of NBA player Smart is and will be. A hawkish defender, he was often Brad Stevens’ secret weapon, shutting down opposing guards, but also spending time pushing 7-foot-3 Kristaps Porzingis out of the post or shutting down Hawks star Paul Millsap in the midst of a 45-point playoff outburst. Smart is one of the best garbage players in the NBA, and that’s meant as a compliment, thanks to his ability to attack the offensive glass, pick up loose balls, and force mayhem on both ends of the floor. He also deserves credit for his willingness to take, and make, big shots, playing beyond his shooting percentages in pressure situations. He’s also only 12 days older than Dunn.

The case against Smart

Man, that shot. Smart’s jumper is not pretty and neither are his shooting percentages. He shot just .253 on 3-pointers last year, third-worst in the NBA. He has also demonstrated time and again an inability to score at the rim, where he’s often swallowed up by bigger players. Smart’s impressive athleticism tends to be of the horizontal variety, where his foot speed allows him to stay in front of opposing ball handlers. He’s vertically challenged, however, lacking explosiveness at the rim. There are also real questions about his ball handling, which is why Evan Turner ends up playing point guard when Smart’s on the floor. His shot selection remains extremely iffy — Smart has never met a contested 3-pointer early in the shot clock that he wouldn’t take. Then there’s the whole flopping/complaining thing.

The Verdict

The Celtics need scoring, not another athletic, defensive-minded point guard. Even accepting that Dunn will be a better pro than Smart, the C’s can do better with the third pick when they already have a reasonable facsimile on their roster. Keep Smart, use the third pick on a shooter.

Previous entries

May 24: DeMarcus Cousins vs. Blake Griffin
May 23: Bradley Beal vs. Gordon Hayward
May 20: Buddy Hield vs. Jaylen Brown
May 19: Jahlil Okafor vs. Dragan Bender

Blog Author: 
John Tomase

Brandon Ingram is considered one of the top two players in the upcoming draft. (Robert Hanashiro/USA Today Sports)Enough of the talk. Danny Ainge needs to make just one deal. Trade up for one of the top two picks and get Brandon Ingram.



MIKE PETRAGLIA

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Appearing on WEEI’s OMF program Tuesday, ESPN basketball columnist and hall of famer Jackie MacMullan gave Celtics fans a huge reality check when it comes to Kevin Durant.