Words fail. After six games and seven overtimes what more could possibly be said about this series? That it’s the greatest first round series in the history of the NBA? Well, yeah.
 
That it’s the most competitive series in the history of basketball? Probably so.
 



For most of the 2008-09 season, people have been struggling to define just how fast Rajon Rondo actually is.

It is known, for example, that there is no one in the NBA who can stay in front of him on a consistent basis. It was suggested, by Rondo himself, that he could beat Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt in the 100 meters. It’s taken 82 games, five more in the playoffs and four overtime periods before we could definitively answer the question, but here it is: Rajon Rondo is fast enough to save a season in 94 seconds.



Put more time on the clock. The Celtics could do this all night.

After playing an NBA-record third overtime game in a postseason series, they were ready for more. Understaffed and overworked, they still weren’t phased by the extended minutes they have played in the first round against the Chicago Bulls.



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Don't blame it on Paul Pierce's missed three-pointer.
 
Don't put it all on Glen Davis' offensive struggles.

 
Don't point the finger at Kendrick Perkins' six fouls.
 



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There were more than enough 'what if’s' in the aftermath of the Celtics double-overtime loss to the Bulls Sunday afternoon in Game 4 of their first-round series. What if Paul Pierce had made both of his free throws at the end of the first overtime? What if the Celtics had been able to foul Ben Gordon instead of allowing him to get a 3-pointer? What if Brad Miller had been thrown out? 
 



On the night that Derrick Rose received his Rookie of the Year award, the Boston Celtics reminded the Chicago Bulls just how young they are.

One of the biggest question marks entering the playoffs was the Bulls' inexperience. But Rose's freakish talent carried them to a Game 1 victory in Boston against the defending champions. He outshined Rajon Rondo, scoring 36 points to Rondo's 29, and established himself as the point guard to watch in the series.



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Everyone has a theory about Paul Pierce. He’s tired. He’s getting older. He’s hurt. If you played Revolution No. 9 backward, Ray Allen would tell you the truth about The Truth. Whatever the reason, the general consensus was that something was wrong with the Captain after two games in which he struggled to get his shot off, and missed 60 percent of the time when he did. 
 



Derrick Rose is proving the Chicago Bulls can turn to him for just about anything on the court. Thirty-six points in his first postseason game against the defending world champions, clutch free throws in one of the loudest arenas in the league, blocked shots against the reigning NBA Finals MVP -- the Bulls ask for it, he’s got it.

But there is one thing Rose’s teammates have that he cannot offer. That’s why the rookie is turning to Ben Gordon and Kirk Hinrich for their postseason experience.



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When he walked into the post-game press conference, Doc Rivers looked like he had just spent the last 48 minutes trying to guard Ben Gordon coming off multiple screens. “The only comment I have,” Rivers said, “is I pray that Danny Ainge didn’t watch this game.”
 



For nearly ten years it has been Ray Allen versus Rip Hamilton. The two University of Connecticut standouts have gone hard at one another, so hard in fact that Allen wears a sleeve to protect his arm from Hamilton's swipes. But after Game 2 between the Boston Celtics and Chicago Bulls, a new UConn rivalry was born. On Monday night, it was Allen versus Ben Gordon.

 



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