James Young

James Young

New Celtics guard James Young joined Middays with MFB on Monday afternoon, following his introductory press conference, and the former Kentucky standout said he’s “honored” to have been selected 17th overall. To hear the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

“I definitely wanted to come here,” Young said. “When I came out here for my last visit, me and coach [Brad Sevens] really had that connection from right there, and Danny [Ainge] was a great guy to talk to. So, this is a place that I definitely wanted to come to.

“When I got my name called I was very surprised and happy. I was just very glad that my parents got to support me. They were very happy with my choice, too. I’m glad that I landed here.”

Young said he thinks he’ll fit in at shooting guard, wing or wherever the team wants him to play.

“I’m very versatile,” he said. “Length definitely helps me. I can shoot the ball very well and come off pick and rolls, definitely a thing that I’ve been working on. But playing the 2 spot is what I’ve been playing a lot. I’m definitely good at playing the 3; that’s what I played this past season, switching off like that. I played the 1 and the 4, too, so we’ll see how that goes.”

A Michigan native who grew up rooting for the Pistons, Young said his game is comparable to that of Rockets guard James Harden, who like Young shoots left-handed.

“I feel like James Harden, his game’s just all-around good,” Young said. “He’s a great left-hander, shoots the ball very well and attacks the basket with aggressiveness, just aggressively attacks the basket. I kind of tried to [model] my game after him, just try to study his game a little bit.”

The 18-year-old said he and fellow first-round pick Marcus Smart have established a fast bond despite never having played with or against each other before.

“I feel like we’re going to connect really well on the court,” he said. “We have that connection off the court, so I definitely feel like on the court. If one of us is having a bad game and can’t get open, we’ll definitely look for each other just to get it going.”

For more Celtics news, visit the team page at weei.com/celtics.

Blog Author: 
Jerry Spar

Oklahoma State basketball coach Travis Ford joined Middays with MFB Monday afternoon to discuss his former player, Marcus Smart, who was taken by the Celtics with the sixth overall pick in Thursday’s NBA draft.

Oklahoma State basketball coach Travis Ford joined Middays with MFB Monday afternoon to discuss his former player, Marcus Smart, who was taken by the Celtics with the sixth overall pick in Thursday’s NBA draft. To listen to the interview, go to the MFB audio on demand page.

While Smart has been praised for his defense, passing, leadership and ability to drive to the basket, the Texas native was punished this past season for shoving a fan during the closing seconds of Oklahoma State’€™s 65-61 loss against Texas Tech on Feb. 8. Ford said the incident is a non-issue going forward.

“That seems like it has passed. … For a solid week or two, that’€™s all that was being talked about,”€ Ford said. “€œI hated it for the kid. There’€™s no question that he made a mistake and he’€™s the first one that would admit it. … It was just a moment in time –€“ a two- to three-second moment in time — that does not define Marcus whatsoever.”

Ford added that Smart, who averaged 18.0 points, 5.9 rebounds and 4.8 assists in 32.7 minutes a game as a sophomore in 2013-14, will bring a lot of attributes to the parquet floor.

“I think they just loved his competitiveness. Marcus is a winner,”€ Ford said. “€œThere’€™s not many players period that I’ve ever been associated with that is as competitive as he is on a daily basis. He has a motor that just doesn’t quit. … He’s all about giving it everything he’s got and trying to win whatever it is. … Marcus is just a warrior, and I think that’€™s what impressed [Boston] the most.”

Smart put the college basketball world on notice during his freshman season with the Cowboys, averaging 15.4 points, 5.8 rebounds and 4.2 assists en route to being named a first-team All-American by Sporting News and a unanimous selection as Big 12 Player of the Year.

Despite his success and the certainty of being one of the top picks in a weak 2013 draft, Smart chose to spend another season at Oklahoma State — a decision Ford said was made for a multitude of reasons.

“Obviously, he had the option to come out last season,” Ford said. “He would have been probably a top-three pick and everybody was telling him how crazy he was for not coming out because this year’€™s draft was going to be so much tougher and he just kind of laughed it off. … He embraces competition. … There were a lot of reasons he stayed. Yes, one reason was that he wanted to work on his shooting, work on ball handling.

“He really wanted to play the point guard position and it became very natural for him. We made him a point guard. He never really played point guard until he got Oklahoma State and I kind of brought him in and said, ‘€œHey, you are going to be the point guard,’€ and he obviously had an incredible two seasons. More than anything, the reason he stayed is he just wanted another year of college — just the whole experience of being in college.”

While critics have pointed out that Smart has struggled with his outside shooting during his collegiate career (29.9 percent from 3-point range in 2013-14), Ford said that Smart should morph into a capable shooter with more experience in the NBA.

“Marcus has great form, and his percentages are going to go way up, I believe, in the NBA,”€ Ford said. “€œHe took a lot of tough shots for us, there’€™s not doubt about that. A lot of tough shots. Obviously, that is going to affect your shooting percentage greatly. … I think he will be a very good shooter. … Is he going to be a guy that’€™s just going to take a ton of 3′s every single game and just be known for his shooting? I don’€™t know about that. But he will become a very good shooter, because he has great form and technique.”

For more Celtics news, go to the team page at weei.com/celtics.

Blog Author: 
Conor Ryan

With NBA free agency opening Tuesday, we continue our annual examination of the options available to the Celtics at each position. Today’s focus: Power forwards. Unlike recent seasons, C’s president of basketball operations Danny Ainge is expected to have more flexibility than any summer since 2007 when the league’s moratorium on free agent signings is lifted and the salary cap (an estimated $63.2 million) is officially set on July 10.

The Celtics have eight players under guaranteed contracts in 2014-15 for $48.5 million (Rajon Rondo $12.9M; Gerald Wallace $10.1M; Jeff Green $9.2M; Brandon Bass $6.9M; Joel Anthony $3.8M; Vitor Faverani $2.1M; Kelly Olynyk $2.1M; Jared Sullinger $1.4M) as well as $4.1 million in cap holds for first-round picks Marcus Smart and James Young. Pending decisions on or by Kris Humphries, Avery Bradley and Jerryd Bayless, the C’s could have as much as $10 million in cap space — or more if they use the stretch provision on Wallace.

As currently constituted, the Celtics already have a logjam at power forward with Bass, Sullinger and Olynyk on the roster, but all three of those names will continue to be raised in trade discussions as Ainge straddles the fence between rebuilding and reloading this summer. As the C’s retool the roster, any combination of that trio could need replacing through free agency. Just don’t hold your breath for Chris Bosh or Dirk Nowitzki.

Without further ado, let’€™s take a look at their options, separating the current free agents into three categories.

THE BRANDON BASSES

An argument could be made Bass was the best player on the Celtics this past season. The 29-year-old certainly was their most consistent, and his expiring $6.9 million contract also makes him a valuable trade asset. Should the C’s lose Bass in landing another star player and need veteran help for a playoff run, these are your guys.

RICH MAN: PAU GASOL

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 1,884 min, 17.4 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 3.4 apg, 1.5 bpg, 52.2 TS%, 19.3 PER

Why? There’s no doubt Gasol will make a playoff team more dangerous. He’s still one of the most skilled bigs in the game and has championship pedigree.

Why not? Considering the Knicks, Bulls, Mavericks, Rockets, Warriors and Lakers are all rumored suitors, it’s unlikely the 33-year-old will land in Boston.

COMMON MAN: KRIS HUMPHRIES

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 1,376 min, 8.4 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.0 apg, 55.2 TS%, 18.2 PER

Why? Forget all the Kardashian nonsense. Humphries emerged as the unlikeliest of likable characters in the Celtics locker room this past season, providing leadership, professionalism and consistent effort in a tumultuous season.

Why not? There’s little doubt Hump will command less than the $12 million he earned in 2013-14, but the question is how much less. A career double-double per 36 minutes guy, he’d be best suited contributing on a veteran team.

POOR MAN: BORIS DIAW

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 1,974 min, 9.1 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 2.8 apg, 57.8 TS%, 14.1 PER

Why? Frankly, Diaw’s playoff production was astounding. Once a key contributor on the seven-seconds-or-less Suns, he’s developed into a difference-making playmaker on a more methodical juggernaut in San Antonio.

Why not? It’s hard to imagine a more perfect fit for the 32-year-old than the Spurs. Having spent two years in Charlotte, he’s probably more prone to sticking with a playoff team, especially with $60 million in career earnings. 

HOMELESS MEN: Andray Blatche (1,618 min, 11.2 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 1.5 apg, 1.0 spg, 53.2 TS%, 18.8 PER); Drew Gooden (395 min, 8.3 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 59.1 TS%, 18.4 PER); Elton Brand (1,414 min, 5.7 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 1.2 bpg, 1.0 apg, 56.1 TS%, 14.0 PER); Glen Davis (1,662 min, 9.4 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 1.1 apg, 49.1 TS%, 13.1 PER); Charlie Villanueva (180 min, 4.6 ppg, 1.7 rpg, 46.9 TS%, 12.7 PER); Udonis Haslem (653 min, 3.8 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 52.3 TS%, 10.5 PER); Matt Bonner (690 min, 3.2 ppg, 2.1 rpg, 58.2 TS%, 11.2 PER).

THE JARED SULLINGERS

After back surgery cut his rookie season short, Sullinger returned to play 74 games this past season, showing double-double potential. Conditioning remains a concern, but the 22-year-old has reportedly dedicated his summer to dropping 20 pounds. He too is a valuable trade asset, so this group includes other youthful alternatives.

Josh McRoberts

Josh McRoberts

RICH MAN: JOSH McROBERTS

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 2,360 min, 8.5 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 4.3 apg, 54.8 TS%, 13.8 PER

Why? At age 27, McBob enjoyed a career year during Charlotte’s surprising run to the playoffs. In terms of skill set, he’s a younger Boris Diaw, only hairier.

Why not? Speaking of long-haired stretch 4′s, Olynyk has shown enough signs to warrant playing time on a young roster over someone like McRoberts.

COMMON MAN: ED DAVIS

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 956 min, 5.7 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 54.2 TS%, 15.9 PER

Why? Once considered a prized recruit coming out of high school in 2008, Davis has yet to reach that potential, but his numbers projected over 36 minutes per game (11.9 points, 10.2 rebounds) continue to show signs.

Why not? While he might be worth the gamble for a young team capable of offering big minutes, Davis would be redundant on a rebuilding Celtics team and a downgrade if Ainge goes the reloading route.

POOR MAN: JORDAN HILL

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 1,500 min, 9.7 ppg, 7.4 rpg, 57.9 TS%, 19.3 PER

Why? Always a workhorse on the glass, Hill took a step forward offensively at age 25, shooting better than 50 percent from the field for the first time in a five-year career that has seen him in three different jerseys.

Why not? As was the case with most players on the Lakers roster, Hill’s numbers benefited from playing for a terrible team this past season. Besides, the Lakers, Mavericks and Rockets are already rumored to be in pursuit.

HOMELESS MEN: DeJuan Blair (1,214 min, 6.4 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 55.7 TS%, 17.3 PER); Patrick Patterson (1,533 min, 8.5 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 1.2 apg, 53.3 TS%, 14.6 PER); Mike Scott (1,482 min, 9.6 ppg, 3.6 rpg, 55.9 TS%, 15.3 PER); Jason Smith (830 min, 9.7 ppg, 5.8 rpg, 49.5 TS%, 12.4 PER); Jeff Adrien (961 min, 6.8 ppg, 5.8 rpg, 55.3 TS%, 17.4 PER); Kevin Seraphin (578 min, 4.7 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 53.3 TS%, 12.5 PER); Ryan Kelly, restricted (1,312 min, 8.0 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 1.6 apg, 54.8 TS%, 12.6 PER); Jan Vesely (776 min, 3.6 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 1.0 spg, 49.8 TS%, 12.7 PER).

THE CHRIS WILCOX HONORARIES

Either not worth the asking price or not worth any price, these guys are a dime a dozen and wouldn’€™t be an upgrade over Wilcox or any other available power forwards at the league minimum. Thanks, but no thanks.

Trevor Booker: 1,553 min, 6.8 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 56.3 TS%, 15.0 PER
Earl Clark: 768 min, 4.8 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 46.6 TS%, 9.1 PER
Al Harrington: 511 min, 6.6 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 50.6 TS%, 9.7 PER
Antawn Jamison: 248 min, 3.8 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 40.8 TS%, 7.8 PER
Grant Jerrett (D-League): 790 min, 15.1 ppg, 6.1 rpg, 54.2 TS%, 15.1 PER
James Johnson: 956 min, 7.4 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 2.1 apg, 1.1 bpg, 55.2 TS%, 18.5 PER
Ivan Johnson (China): 788 min, 26.0 ppg, 9.9 rpg, 2.9 spg, 1.9 apg, 59.6 TS%, 32.8 PER
Kenyon Martin: 633 min, 4.3 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 1.6 apg, 52.1 TS%, 12.2 PER
Byron Mullens: 414 min, 4.2 ppg, 2.0 rpg, 54.4 TS%, 12.8 PER
Tyrus Thomas: 360 min, 4.8 ppg, 2.3 rpg, 41.8 TS%, 9.6 PER
Jeremy Tyler: 398 min, 3.6 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 53.2 TS%, 13.0 PER
Ekpe Udoh, restricted: 804 min, 3.4 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 1.0 bpg, 44.0 TS%, 7.6 PER
D.J. White: 10 min, 0.0 ppg, 1.0 rpg, 0.0 TS%, 2.4 PER
Royce White: 9 min, 0.0 ppg, 0.0 rpg, 0.0 TS%, -8.3 PER

Outside of Bosh, Nowitzki and Gasol, believe it or not, there isn’t a true upgrade at power forward available on the free agent market. The likelihood of any of those three players ending up in green is as slim as a Hollywood actress, so don’t be surprised if Bass, Sullinger and Olynyk round out the position once again this winter.

Obviously, a trade could change everything, especially since all three of those Celtics have been rumored in deals for Kevin Love. If the C’s were to be in the market for a backup 4, Humphries offers another in-house solution.

Blog Author: 
Ben Rohrbach
Former coach of Celtics 1st-round pick Marcus Smart, Travis Ford joins MFB to talk about what Celtics fans should expect from the strong point guard. Among other things, Coach Ford says Smart will be a hard worker, and will improve his shooting ability.

Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo is rumored to be seeking the equivalent of a max contract, according to radio analyst Cedric Maxwell.

Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo is rumored to be seeking the equivalent of a max contract, according to radio analyst Cedric Maxwell. That combined with the selection of Oklahoma State sophomore Marcus Smart in the first round of the 2014 NBA draft could spell the end of Rondo’s tenure in Boston, Maxwell added.

“I think it basically gives you an indicator of what the Celtics want to do,” Maxwell told Yahoo Sports Radio. “Rumor has it that Rondo has asked for a $100 million extension. You’ve got Smart, the young kid, and you’ve got Young, the other kid from Kentucky — both guards. And in the NBA system right now, the way they’re being paid, you would pay both those guys probably about $4 million for one year instead of the $100 million right now that Rondo wanted to ask for.

“So, if you’re Rondo, you might want to start calling that moving company and say, ‘Eh, come get my stuff. I don’t think I’m going to be here too long.’”

Maxwell is correct in his assumption that Smart and Young are slotted to make $4.1 million this coming season, but the Celtics can’t technically sign Rondo to a $100 million extension this summer. They could offer him a three-year, $44.8 million extension, but Rondo cannot command his five-year, $104.7 million max deal until reaching unrestricted free agency in 2015.

Blog Author: 
Ben Rohrbach
The always entertaining and informative Steve Bulpett joins Butchie to talk some Celtics b-ball. He gives his opinion on what the C's did on draft night -- he's high on both picks and think they can contribute, specifically on offense. He also gets into the Love deal and the fact that it is not over yet. He talks free agency with Lebron and Carmello and if the Celts will kick the tires on any of the big names and talks about Rondo's future as well.

[0:00:55] ... about how good. NBA players these guys could be comparing James younger Morris Peterson. Saying he was one of the three best shooters in the draft saying markets Smart. One of the competitive light goes on ...
[0:04:00] ... Smart. I think it's fair to say that if a guy like Jeff Green and market Smart approach. In the him more. That you know you be talking about a much different basketball player Jeff Green. And -- guy like he's young he's you know he's he's the only two years old. But I like the fact that. ...
[0:13:29] ... space for the whole. That they could get involved with -- but Carmelo Anthony or maybe little -- came out and got an app obviously but. You know. Cap space and things like better become like ...
[0:14:02] ... were not commit to deal with Celtics. Not because of what happened Kevin Garnett but because they just didn't feel all along that the Boston had what they wanted. They didn't wanna go into the deep ...






As expected, the Celtics have extended a $3.58 million qualifying offer to guard Avery Bradley, according to The Boston Globe’s Gary Washburn.

With NBA free agency opening Tuesday, we continue our annual examination of the options available to the Celtics at each position. Today’s focus: Small forwards. Unlike recent seasons, C’s president of basketball operations Danny Ainge is expected to have more flexibility than any summer since 2007 when the league’s moratorium on free agent signings is lifted and the salary cap (an estimated $63.2 million) is officially set on July 10.

The Celtics have eight players under guaranteed contracts in 2014-15 for $48.5 million (Rajon Rondo $12.9M; Gerald Wallace $10.1M; Jeff Green $9.2M; Brandon Bass $6.9M; Joel Anthony $3.8M; Vitor Faverani $2.1M; Kelly Olynyk $2.1M; Jared Sullinger $1.4M) as well as $4.1 million in cap holds for first-round picks Marcus Smart and James Young. Pending decisions on or by Kris Humphries, Avery Bradley and Jerryd Bayless, the C’s could have as much as $10 million in cap space — or more if they use the stretch provision on Wallace.

With Green, Wallace, Johnson and Young all under their control for at least the next two seasons, the Celtics seem locked into the position at first glance. Upon closer look, Ainge will surely shop the two years and $18.4 million left on Green’s contract if the youth movement continues, Wallace could be jettisoned, too, Johnson’s contract isn’t guaranteed and Young is just 18 years old. This year’s free agent small forward crop is as good as the shooting guard list is bad, so don’t be surprised if the C’s are linked to every name out there except LeBron James.

Without further ado, let’€™s take a look at their options, separating the current free agents into three categories.

THE JEFF GREENS

Green at his best can start for a playoff team, as he’s proved throughout his career, but Green isn’t always at his best. Still, $9.2 million is the going rate for an athletic 6-foot-9 forward averaging 17  and five a game, so a trade suitor isn’t out of the question. If that’s the case, the C’s could be serious players on the free agent market.

Carmelo Anthony

Carmelo Anthony

RICH MAN: CARMELO ANTHONY

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 2,982 min, 27.4 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 3.1 apg, 1.2 spg, 56.1 TS%, 24.4 PER

Why? One of the game’s 10 best players, Anthony is a volume scorer who would benefit greatly from playing alongside a pass-first point guard like Rondo.

Why not? Not only would the C’s have to get creative in freeing cap space to offer Anthony a max contract, they’d also have to convince him to come to Boston.

COMMON MAN: CHANDLER PARSONS

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 2,783 min, 16.6 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 4.0 apg, 1.2 spg, 56.5 TS%, 15.9 PER

Why? Houston’s second-round pick in 2011, Parsons quickly established himself as a legit third option on the Rockets, but GM Daryl Morey’s own pursuit Melo might make him expendable.

Why not? If the Rockets can’t land Melo, LeBron or both, they’ll do their damnedest to keep Parsons. And if the 26-year-old hits the open market, plenty of other teams will come calling and drive up the price.

POOR MAN: GORDON HAYWARD

Status: Restricted

2013-14: 2,800 min, 16.2 ppg, 5.2 apg, 5.1 rpg, 1.4 spg, 52.0 TS%, 16.2 PER

Why? A poor man’s Melo, at least in this sense, is another man’s treasure. Considering Hayward’s relationship with Stevens, a Butler reunion seems too good to be true. The 24-year-old could be the steal of this free agent class.

Why not? The Jazz can still match any offer Hayward receives this summer, so Ainge would either have to give him an offer Utah CAN refuse or lessen the blow for GM Dennis Lindsey with an sign-and-trade offer.

HOMELESS MEN: Luol Deng (2,213 min, 16.0 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 2.9 apg, 1.0 spg, 51.7 TS%, 15.2 PER); Evan Turner (2,457 min, 14.0 ppg, 5.0 rpg, 3.2 apg, 49.8 TS%, 12.4 PER); Shawn Marion (2,409 min, 10.4 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 1.6 apg, 1.2 spg, 53.7 TS%, 13.7 PER); Caron Butler (1,419 min, 10.5 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 1.5 apg, 51.2 TS%, 12.2 PER); Michael Beasley (831 min, 7.9 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 55.9 TS%, 16.8 PER).

THE GERALD WALLACES

Saddled with one of the NBA’s worst contracts, the Celtics can either cut Wallace and spread his $20 million cap hit over five seasons (stretch provision) or find another team willing to take on his salary as part of a larger package. Either way, they’d love to dump his deal, and here are a few less expensive options should they succeed.

RICH MAN: PAUL PIERCE

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 2,098 min, 13.5 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 2.4 apg, 1.1 spg, 59.5 TS%, 16.8 PER

Why? In addition to the sentimentality behind bringing back one of the franchise’s greatest players, Pierce can still play and would be invaluable in the locker room.

Why not? Given the news that Kevin Garnett plans to return to the Nets for the final year of his deal, it’s hard to imagine Pierce abandoning KG in Brooklyn.

COMMON MAN: TREVOR ARIZA

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 2,723 min, 14.4 ppg, 6.2 rpg, 2.5 apg, 1.6 spg, 59.0 TS%, 15.8 PER

Why? Ariza is one of those guys whose seemingly been around forever and never ages. He’s 28 and had a career year for a Wizards team that made a surprising run to the conference semis.

Why not? After declining each year since signing a five-year, $34.0 million deal in 2009, Ariza returned to form in a contract season. That’s a red flag, especially when teams are bound to drive up his price again this summer.

POOR MAN: DANNY GRANGER

Status: Unrestricted

2013-14: 847 min, 8.2 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 1.0 apg, 50.2 TS%, 10.9 PER

Why? Granger has All-Star talent, as he proved in 2009, when he averaged 25.8 points on 58.4 percent true shooting. As recently as two years ago, he produced 18.7 points, which would have led the C’s last season.

Why not? Now past his 30th birthday, Granger hasn’t been able to stay on the floor for two seasons due to reoccurring issues with his left knee. In all likelihood, his days as an impact player are behind him.

HOMELESS MEN: Mike Miller (1,707 min, 7.1 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 1.6 apg, 61.9 TS%, 12.5 PER); Marvin Williams (1,674 min, 9.1 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 1.2 apg, 54.0 TS%, 14.0 PER); C.J. Miles (984 min, 9.9 ppg, 2.0 rpg, 1.0 apg, 56.9 TS%, 16.0 PER); Al-Farouq Aminu (2,045 min, 7.2 ppg, 6.2 rpg, 1.4 apg, 1.0 spg, 51.6 TS%, 13.2 PER); P.J. Tucker (2,490 min, 9.4 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 1.7 apg, 1.4 spg, 54.0 TS%, 13.3 PER); Richard Jefferson (2,213 min, 10.1 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 1.6 apg, 57.3 TS%, 11.8 PER); Xavier Henry (908 min, 10.0 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 1.2 apg, 1.0 spg, 51.1 TS%, 12.3 PER); Wesley Johnson (2,240 min, 9.1 ppg, 4.4 rpg, 1.6 apg, 1.1 spg, 1.0 bpg, 52.2 TS%, 11.0 PER); Jordan Hamilton (1,019 min, 6.7 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 50.7 TS%, 12.7 PER).

THE CHRIS JOHNSONS

Either not worth the asking price or not worth any price, these guys are a dime a dozen and wouldn’€™t be an upgrade over Johnson or any other available point guard at the league minimum. Thanks, but no thanks.

Rasual Butler: 378 min, 2.7 ppg, 58.5 TS%, 12.2 PER
Dante Cunningham: 1,635 min, 6.3 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 1.0 apg, 47.4 TS%, 12.6 PER
Chris Douglas-Roberts: 1,016 min, 6.9 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 1.0 apg, 58.8 TS%, 12.2 PER
Francisco Garcia: 1,083 min, 5.7 ppg, 2.2 rpg, 1.1 apg, 52.1 TS%, 9.3 PER
Ryan Gomes: 34 min, 1.2 ppg, 37.5 TS%, 0.2 PER
Josh Howard (D-League): 708 min, 14.7 ppg, 5.8 rpg, 1.3 apg, 1.1 spg, 51.2 TS%, 15.3 PER
Robbie Hummel: 655 min, 3.4 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 49.2 TS%, 9.6 PER
Stephen Jackson: 107 min, 1.7 ppg, 1.1 rpg, 27.0 TS%, 0.1 PER
Damion James: 50 min, 1.2 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 30.4 TS%, 4.1 PER
James Jones: 236 min, 4.9 ppg, 1.2 rpg, 66.6 TS%, 15.4 PER
Rashard Lewis: 971 min, 4.5 ppg, 1.8 rpg, 1.0 apg, 53.5 TS%, 10.7 PER
Cartier Martin: 870 min, 5.6 ppg, 1.9 rpg, 56.2 TS%, 11.0 PER
Darius Miller: 723 min, 4.4 ppg, 1.2 rpg, 1.0 apg, 55.0 TS%, 9.0 PER
Andres Nocioni (Europe): 1,411 min, 14.3 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 1.5 apg, 61.5 TS%, 19.3 PER
Brandon Rush: 418 min, 2.1 ppg, 1.2 rpg, 42.8 TS%, 4.1 PER
Chris Singleton: 250 min, 3.0 ppg, 2.2 rpg, 48.1 TS%, 8.8 PER
James Southerland: 30 min, 3.5 ppg, 2.0 rpg, 44.1 TS%, 11.8 PER
Adonis Thomas: 37 min, 2.3 ppg, 48.5 TS%, 7.3 PER
Anthony Tolliver: 1,298 min, 6.1 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 60.5 TS%, 11.0 PER
Hedo Turkoglu: 392 min, 3.0 ppg, 2.3 rpg, 49.2 TS%, 11.3 PER
Metta World Peace: 388 min, 4.8 ppg, 1.4 rpg, 46.9 TS%, 11.7 PER

There are a handful of scenarios that could improve the Celtics‘ lot at small forward, and if they can somehow rid themselves of Green and Wallace’s contracts while coming away with Hayward and Pierce in free agency, that would be one heck of an upgrade. LeBron and Melo are pipe dreams, but this scenario gives the Celtics their starting 3 for the foreseeable future and a veteran presence in the locker room who can help mold Young.

Blog Author: 
Ben Rohrbach