Third periods have been a problem for the Bruins this season, so they implemented an interesting strategy Tuesday night. They only played the third period.

Third periods have been a problem for the Bruins this season, so they implemented an interesting strategy Tuesday night. They only played the third period.

After a generally listless 40 minutes that saw the Ducks take a 4-1 lead, the Bruins pushed back in the third by cutting into Anaheim’€™s lead with a Zdeno Chara goal 2:20 into the third. That would prove to be the extent of Boston’€™s offense despite some solid chances late, however, and the B’€™s hit the All-Star break as losers of a 6-2 contest.

The game featured plenty of the unexpected, from Zach Trotman scoring on the game’€™s first shift to Torey Krug fighting Chris Stewart (as in the Chris Stewart who is five inches and 45 pounds bigger than Krug), but the Bruins’ sleepy play throughout much of the night was not enough to yield significant production against an Anaheim team desperate for points.

The Bruins will be off until next Tuesday, when they host the Leafs at TD Garden.

Here are four more things we learned Tuesday:

GUSTAVSSON TAKEN TO MASS GENERAL

At this point, Bruins goaltenders should be ready for anything on their off-days. After Jonas Gustavsson was given a last-minute start on Saturday due to a Tuukka Rask ailment, Rask was forced to enter Tuesday’€™s game in the second period as a result of Gustavsson being taken to the hospital.

Gustavsson, who was given the start Tuesday, left the game due to an illness and was taken to Mass General. That left the Bruins without a backup goalie on the bench for the entire second period.

PENALTIES CONTINUE TO PILE UP

For a second straight game, the Bruins gave their opponent loads of power play opportunities through the first two periods. After taking four penalties in the first 11 minutes of the second period Monday, Boston gave the Ducks four cracks at a man advantage over the first two periods, with Anaheim cashing in on a power play goal from Shea Theodore at 14:27 of the first.

Zach Trotman also took a delay of game penalty late in the third period, disrupting the Bruins’ comeback attempt when they trailed by two goals.

The Bruins have now allowed power play goals in two straight games after holding opponents without one for nine contests entering Monday.

FERRARO IN FOR RINALDO

The Bruins kept the same lineup as they used on Monday with one exception. Landon Ferraro, who was held out of Monday’€™s game, re-entered the lineup at the expense of Zac Rinaldo. The Bruins’€™ lineup was as follows:

Marchand-Bergeron-Connolly
Spooner-Krejci-Eriksson
Beleskey-Kemppainen-Pastrnak
Ferraro-Talbot-Hayes

Chara-Trotman
Seidenberg-Colin Miller
Krug-Kevan Miller

Gustavsson

The third period saw Julien mix up his lines, moving Spooner back to the third line and having him center Joonas Kemppainen and David Pastrnak. Matt Beleskey moved back to his familiar line with David Krejci and Loui Eriksson.

BELESKEY MAKES FIRST IMPRESSION AGAINST OLD FRIENDS

Beleskey said prior to the game that his former Ducks teammates knew he was going to hit them Tuesday night. He did just that, throwing two big hits on the forecheck on the game’€™s opening shift and then darting to the net, where he screened Frederik Anderson as Zach Trotman’€™s point shot sail past the Anaheim netminder. Trotman’€™s goal was his first of the season.

Beleskey also picked up an assist on Zdeno Chara’€™s goal by giving a drop-pass to the red-hot Spooner, who dished to Chara. Spooner’€™s assist was his team-leading 27th of the season. The 23-year-old now has 13 assists over his last 14 games.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean
Ryan Spooner leads the Bruins with 26 assists. (Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)

Ryan Spooner leads the Bruins with 26 assists. (Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)

Chris Stewart’€™s job seemed simple enough last season: Play and try to put up points until you get traded to the Bruins.

With Boston missing a big, tough right wing following the departure of Jarome Iginla, it became common knowledge that then-Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli was keen on Stewart, a young former first-round pick of the Avalanche who was playing on a Sabres team that was sure to sell. Stewart expressed an interest in such a scenario unfolding, telling WEEI.com in December of last season that he felt he would be a good fit on the Bruins.

“You try not to buy into stuff, but usually when there’€™s smoke there’€™s fire,” the now-Ducks forward said Tuesday of being linked to the Bruins. “That was probably the most predominant team that I was hearing about all year. I’€™m not too sure what happened [that I didn’€™t get traded to Boston].”

Here’€™s what happened: Despite the Bruins and Sabres discussing Stewart throughout the season, no deal was ever struck and the Bruins eventually moved on to then-Lightning forward Brett Connolly.

The Bruins not acquiring Stewart was certainly not for lack of trying, however. According to ESPN’€™s Pierre LeBrun, Chiarelli offered the Sabres a second-round pick and center Ryan Spooner for Stewart in October of last season, only to have the offer rejected.

In hindsight, that would have gone down as one of the worst deals of Chiarelli’€™s tenure as Bruins general manager. Stewart had a modest campaign (11 goals, 14 assists) with the Sabres and was made a healthy scratch at points of a 61-game stretch, diminishing his value and eventually leading the Sabres to send him to the Wild for a 2017 second-round pick at the trade deadline. Buffalo had to retain half of Stewart’€™s $4.15 million cap hit in order to secure a future second-rounder, far less than what Chiarelli had offered months earlier.

While the Bruins used the second-rounder towards acquiring Connolly, who has struggled with goal-scoring but has as many goals as Stewart (seven) this season at a smaller price tag, the most obvious reason why that trade would have been a disaster is Spooner.

Both last season and this season, Spooner has been far more of an impact player than Stewart, who is five years older than Spooner and had unrestricted free agent status awaiting last season. In 24 games following his Feb. 22 midseason debut, Spooner had eight goals and 10 assists for 18 points. Stewart performed well between Buffalo and Minnesota during that stretch, though his five goals and nine assists for 14 points in 24 games fell short of Spooner’€™s totals.

This season, Spooner’€™s taken a major leap forward, as he has 10 goals and a team-leading 26 assists for 36 points. Even better for the Bruins is the fact that because he’€™s on just his second contract and didn’€™t have enough of an NHL track record to warrant bigger money at the time of signing, he carries a cap hit of $950,000 for the next two seasons, after which the Bruins will still hold his rights as a restricted free agent.

After playing 20 regular-season games and eight playoff games for the Wild, Stewart took a one-year, $1.7 million deal with the Ducks. Playing mostly as a third-liner, Stewart has seven goals and six assists for 13 points in 40 games for Anaheim. Given that the Ducks are his fourth team in as many seasons, he hopes that he can stay with the team for a long time.

At the very least, he has better job security on a team pushing for a playoff spot than he did last season with the Sabres. Because Buffalo was in full-tank mode for Connor McDavid or Jack Eichel, the latter of whom they eventually got, Stewart knew all along that he had a better chance of finishing the season in Boston — or anywhere else — than in Buffalo.

“The biggest part of it was they were so open about the rebuild, that everyone who was on the last year of their contract knew they were getting traded,” Stewart said. “I don’€™t think I’€™ve ever seen anything like that before. There were probably about a good seven or eight guys who were all in the same boat.”

In the end, the Spooner-and-a-second-for-Stewart deal not happening has been a win for everyone but the Sabres. Stewart has been able to move on with his career, while the Bruins avoided giving away a big piece of their future for a rental.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

The Bruins can enter the All-Star break in second place in the Atlantic Division with a win over the Ducks Tuesday night at TD Garden. After jumping past the Lightning for the third place on Monday, the B’€™s now sit a point behind the Red Wings, who are idle on Tuesday.

Detroit has 58 points in 49 games, while the Bruins have 57 in 48. Both teams will sit at 49 games at the break, with Tuesday determining the order.

“It’€™s very important for us; we want to move up in the standings,” David Pastrnak said Tuesday morning. “This is a big opportunity for us tonight. We’€™re going to have to finish strong and be ready for tonight.”

The Ducks currently sit outside of the playoff picture in the Western Conference, though they have multiple games in hand on the two teams directly in front of them in the Pacific Division. In 46 games, Anaheim has 49 points to Vancouver’€™s 51 in 49 and Arizona’€™s 53 in 48. The Ducks currently sit fifth in the Pacific and trail the Wild (55 points in 49 games), Avalanche (55 points in 50 games) and Canucks in the Wild Card race.

The Bruins did not have a morning skate on Tuesday, leaving their potential lineup for the game ambiguous.

In injury news, Claude Julien offered no update on Adam McQuaid, who has yet to begin skating since suffering an upper-body injury on Jan. 5.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

Brett Connolly’€™s luck finally came back when the Bruins needed it most.

Brett Connolly

Brett Connolly

Brett Connolly’€™s luck finally came back when the Bruins needed it most.

After blowing a third-period lead to the Flyers for the second time in less than two weeks, the Bruins found themselves tied with minutes to play. Connolly changed that by redirecting a Zdeno Chara point shot past Michal Neuvirth with just under two minutes remaining in regulation to give the Bruins a 3-2 win. The goal marked the first time Connolly had scored on a goaltender in 35 games, as he had just one empty-net goal dating back to the start of December.

Chara had a pair of assists for the Bruins. He also drew a high stick from Simmonds with 1:38 remaining in the game, which appeared to sew up the victory until Torey Krug was called for a trip 35 seconds later to set up 4-on-4 play for the remainder of regulation.

Prior to Connolly’s game-winner, the Flyers tied the game on something of a controversial play that led to Wayne Simmonds’ second goal of the night. Claude Julien challenged the play to see if Michael Del Zotto was offsides as the Flyers entered the offensive zone. Though the play sure looked to be offsides, the officials confirmed the on-ice goal call.

The B’€™s will host the Ducks Tuesday at TD Garden in their final game before the All-Star break. Here are four more things we learned Monday:

ALL IS WELL WITH RASK, SCRATCHED YOUNGSTERS RETURN

Monday’€™s lineup featured quite a few changes from Saturday’€™s, the most encouraging of which was that Tuukka Rask played after being held out of Saturday’€™s game with an undisclosed ailment.

In addition to Rask returning, Brett Connolly and Colin Miller returned to the lineup after healthy scratch stints of one and four games, respectively. Connolly’€™s return came at the expense of Landon Ferraro, who has been battling an upper-body injury, while Joe Morrow was made a healthy scratch to accommodate Miller’€™s return.

With Monday’€™s changes, the lineup looked as such:

Marchand-Bergeron-Connolly
Spooner-Krejci-Eriksson
Beleskey-Kemppainen-Pastrnak
Rinaldo-Talbot-Hayes
Chara-Trotman
Seidenberg-Colin Miller
Krug-Kevan Miller

PENALTIES APLENTY

The Bruins gave the Flyers every opportunity to tie the game in the second period, as Boston took four penalties in the first 10:57 of the second.

Rask and the Bruins’€™ surging penalty kill ‘€” which had not allowed a power play goal in nine games entering Monday ‘€” limited the damage by allowing only a Wayne Simmonds power play tally.

As for Boston’€™s power play, the B’€™s returned to producing on the man advantage after entering Monday’€™s game with no goals over 11 power plays in five games. Power play goals from Bergeron and Marchand gave the Bruins a 2-0 lead, albeit one they would ultimately relinquish.

MARCHAND HITS 20

With his first-period goal, Brad Marchand now has a five-game goal streak. Monday’€™s tally also brought him to a team-leading 20 goals.

With another strong season, Marchand has reached the 20-goal mark in all five non-shortened seasons since becoming an NHL regular in the 2010-11 season. He nearly reached that total in the lockout-shortened season, when he led the B’€™s with 18 goals in 45 games.

The 27-year-old has never reached the 30-goal plateau, though that seems likely as long as he stays healthy and in the Department of Player Safety’€™s good graces. He’€™s currently on pace for 36 goals, which would make him the Bruins’€™ highest-scoring player since Phil Kessel scored 36 in 70 games back in the 2008-09 season.

SPOONER TAKES ASSISTS LEAD

File this under Things Nobody Saw Coming: Thanks his recent torrid stretch of production, Ryan Spooner overtook Patrice Bergeron for the Bruins’€™ lead in assist with 26 when he picked up the primary helper on Bergeron’€™s first-period power play goal.

Spooner has registered 12 assists over his last 13 games dating back to Dec. 29, which was the Bruins’€™ first game after David Krejci‘€™s injury. With 36 points on the season, Spooner is on pace for 62 points this season. Should he reach that mark, it would be the most points by a Bruin in their first full NHL season since Krejci put up 73 in 2008-09.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean
Mut, Gary and Price get right into the huge AFC Championship between the Pats and Broncos in Denver later today. The guys just don't see how Peyton can move the ball enough to keep up with Brady, Edelman and Gronk. They all think we'll see the Pats in yet another Super Bowl in 2 weeks. The guys look at various match-ups well see later today at Mile High.
Brick calls the boys to talks some Bruins hockey. He gets into the Eriksson situation and how he sees it shaking out. He talks about how this is Eriksson's last real chance at big money deal and he's not going to mess that up. Brick also talks about the Bruins defense, what they need to do gong forward and the play of Zdeno Chara who has been effective but has clearly lost a step as he enters the latter part of his career. Andy also says the Bruins need to pick up their play on home ice if they're going to have any chance at success this season.

[0:06:45] ... Louis for a second break yet mentioned the Eason certainly in the Atlantic Division when you look at the way the standings are currently set up. Right now on January whatever that today's the 24. You ...
[0:08:35] ... know where's the density intensity for everybody well. Get it it's equal Kevin Millar tag that Soviet satellite data but let me eat it everyday no. And I and I waited for him blocks in it ...
[0:12:52] ... of you know it's gonna be true. Total melting pot of gains. Zdeno Chara you know given worries in his career. It's still good enough absolutely. Which look to see more consistently. And in more dominant ...





DJ, Joe and Ken discuss the status of Loui Eriksson in Boston and if the Bruins are willing to commit to him long-term. They talk about what they could get back if they do move him and negotiations on a new deal. Eriksson has a great agent and both sides will be looking to capitalize. This is an important moment and decision for GM Don Sweeney and his tenure.

Brett Connolly has two goals his last 35 games. (Joel Auerbach/Getty Images)The Bruins played Ryan Spooner as a first-line right wing Saturday and were rewarded handsomely for it against the Blue Jackets.