Gregory Campbell‘€™s first goal of the season was a big one, as he redirected a pass from Daniel Paille past Antti Niemi to break a third-period tie and help the Bruins to a 5-3 win over the Sharks.

Gregory Campbell‘€™s first goal of the season was a big one, as he redirected a pass from Daniel Paille past Antti Niemi to break a third-period tie and help the Bruins to a 5-3 win over the Sharks.

Milan Lucic (three assists) and Torey Krug (a goal and two assists) each had three points in the victory, which gave the Bruins three wins in their last four games and evened their record at 4-4-0 on the season through eight games.

Campbell wasn’€™t the only Bruin to find the back of the net for the first time tis season, as Brad Marchand took advantage of power play time given to him on a first-period man advantage and beat Niemi from the right circle to make it 1-0 13:57 into the game. Logan Couture would answer back with a Sharks power play goal minutes later with Marchand in the box for cross-checking.

The B’€™s tok a 2-1 lead on a power play goal from Krug, but fell behind when the Sharks got goals from Couture and Joe Thornton in a span of 39 seconds against Patrice Bergeron‘€™s line. Seth Griffith scored his first career NHL goal in the third to tie it.

Tuukka Rask made 31 saves  in the victory, coming up big in the final minutes as the Bruins had to kill off four-minute Bergeron minor for high-sticking. With Niemi pulled, David Krejci scored a shorthanded empty-netter to seal the win.

The B’€™s will next play Thursday, when they host the Islanders for the first time since trading Johnny Boychuk to New York just before the season.

Here are some observations from the game:

- Bergeron was on the ice for all three of San Jose’€™s goals over the first two periods, one of which was a power-play goal. If that isn’€™t unusual enough, Thornton’€™s second-period goal marked the third time in eight games this season that the Bruins have allowed a 5-on-5 goal with both Zdeno Chara and Bergeron on the ice. This season is off to a very un-Bruins start. Remember, the B’€™s only allowed one 5-on-5 goal with the duo on the ice in the lockout-shortened 2013 season.

Chara doesn’€™t have bad games, but Tuesday was definitely one of them. The Bruins’€™ captain had lots of trouble with the puck, even committing a turnover by the net on a late penalty kill that very well could have cost the Bruins. Chara slammed his stick in frustration against the bench after a shift in the third period.

- Bergeron finished the night a minus-2 and took a high-sticking double-minor in the last four and a half minutes to leave the Bruins killing a penalty in a one-goal game without their best penalty-killing forward. An odd night for Bergeron indeed, who now has 10 penalty minutes through eight games.

- David Krejci‘€™s line had a nice turnaround as the game went on after being turnover city in the first period. Lucic turned two pucks over on one shift in the game’€™s fifth minute and Krejci had a giveaway on an ensuing shift. Krejci’€™s line still dominated possession on the night.

- Krejci turned in a nice play on Krug’€™s power-play goal. After the faceoff, Krejci appeared to take a stick to the facial area, dropping his own stick as he grabbed his face. He quickly recovered and picked up his stick in time to get to the front of the net and provide a screen on Krug’€™s goal.

- Marchand has been on and off the Bruins’€™ power play units this season. Tuesday’€™s goal should help his case to get more consistent minutes on the man advantage. Boston’€™s top unit worked well on his goal, with Torey Krug averting defenders in the right circle before sending the puck low to Milan Lucic. Marchand, who was back at the point with Krug pinching, took the pass from Lucic, walked up and fired a shot from the circle for his first goal of the season.

 

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

Inappropriate gestures aside, it’€™s been a weird start to the season for Milan Lucic.

Inappropriate gestures aside, it’€™s been a weird start to the season for Milan Lucic.

The Bruins’€™ top left wing has had two different centers and three different right wings over seven games. In three of the first seven games, he’€™s played on a line that was different from the previous game. He’€™s also returning from offseason wrist surgery, which looks to be limiting him less and less as the games go on.

Still, numbers don’€™t lie. Lucic, traditionally a fast starter, has gone without a point in all but one game this season. He has no goals, with his two-point performance last week against the Canadiens remaining the only time he’€™s shown up on the scoresheet.

It appears that Seth Griffith will serve as Lucic and David Krejci‘€™s right wing Tuesday against the Sharks. The line had some good looks for three games before Griffith was replaced with Simon Gagne Saturday. Lucic feels that he can still find his way and the back of the net despite the revolving door on the right side of his line.

“I think the guys who have come in have played well,” Lucic said. “You look at the last three games, we were able to create a bunch of chances, but it seems like they’€™re just not going in for us right now. I don’€™t think overthinking anything or getting frustrated is going to get us anywhere. I think we’€™ve just got to keep playing in the O zone and creating chances and eventually they’€™ll start going in.”

As for the wrist, Lucic says it’€™s become less of a mental obstacle than it was earlier in the season, when he was a borderline invisible player on a borderline invisible line with Ryan Spooner and Matt Fraser.

Now, with more games under his belt, Lucic doesn’€™t see the wrist as being an issue. All that’€™s left for him is to start finding the back of the net.

“[The wrist is] definitely getting a lot better, thinking about it a lot less, as far as re-injuring it again,” he said. “From a mental standpoint, it’€™s definitely becoming more positive.”

When asked Tuesday morning if Lucic was close to being the player he is when he’€™s at the top of his game, Claude Julien hinted at the obvious by saying people have seen him play long enough to know “how good he can be.” He doesn’€™t seem ready to use the roster uncertainty as an excuse for Lucic’€™s start.

“It’€™s up to each individual to play to their level. I’€™ve always said that,” Julien said. “It doesn’€™t matter who you play with, we rate players on their play ‘€” their sole play ‘€” and it doesn’€™t matter who you’€™re with; we still expect certain things.

“He’€™s come off an injury, he’€™s missed a little bit of the conditioning before camp started. He wasn’€™t able to play for a little while. What I like right now is he’€™s starting to come around and that’€™s the most important thing. I’€™m not going to dwell on the past more than’€”I like what I see he’€™s getting better all the time so he’€™s got to continue to improve.”

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean
Seth Griffith

Seth Griffith

Tuukka Rask was first goaltender off the ice at Tuesday’€™s morning skate, suggesting he’€™ll be between the pipes against the Sharks.

With Kevan Miller out, Matt Bartkowski is set to enter the lineup. The Bruins will play Torey Krug on the right side of the second pairing with Dennis Seidenberg.

Krug is a left shot, but he has experience playing the right side dating back to college. Seidenberg is also a lefty who can play both sides.

Matt Fraser appears to be the team’€™s healthy scratch on offense, as he rotated in on the fourth line but stayed on the ice later than his teammates.

The lines and pairings in morning skate were as follows:

Marchand – Bergeron – Smith
Lucic – Krejci – Griffith
Kelly – Soderberg – Eriksson
Paille – Campbell – Gagne

Chara – Hamilton
Seidenberg – Krug
Bartkowski – McQuaid

Rask

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILMINGTON — As his team prepares to take on San Jose, the Islanders and Toronto this week, Claude Julien can finally sense things coming together after a sluggish start.

The Bruins started 1-2-0, including an ugly 4-0 loss to the Capitals on home ice and a brutal 2-1 loss to Colorado in the final second. After beating the Red Wings in a shootout, the Bruins were embarrassed again in Montreal, featuring the emotional meltdown of Milan Lucic.

But things finally seemed to click in Buffalo, where Niklas Svedberg earned his first career shutout in just his third NHL start. The 4-0 win seemed to give the Julien and the team something to build on. Two wins in three games doesn’t classify as red-hot but it’s certainly a step in the right direction the way Julien sees it.

“I don’t know if it’s how far we’ve come or how far we have to go,” Julien said. “I think it’s just a matter of us continuing to get better as a team. I think it’s still early in the season and I think there are a lot of teams that are probably saying the same thing. It takes certain guys a while to get going. It takes others even longer. Some guys get off to a good start and then they slow down.

“We’re just looking at our team as a whole. I think what we’re looking for is consistency and we’re looking for an identity. And that’s what we’re starting to get right now, more of an identity. I think we’ve been a lot more consistent in the last three games.”

What is that identity?

“Same as it’s always been,” Julien said, referring to his team’s tough, rugged style that relies on good defense, a good forecheck, stellar goaltending and opportunistic play around the net.

Part of the Bruins getting back on track has to do with getting veteran players back on track, like Dennis Seidenberg and Chris Kelly. Both have to find their rhythm much in the same way Gregory Campbell did last season.

“I don’t think I can compare because everybody is different,” Julien said. “There’s Sides, there’s also Kelly in that boat as well that missed a lot of time. I think overall guys are working on finding their game. I think Sides has been getting a little bit better as the more we play, the better he’s getting. It’s about getting guys some time to find their games.”

That process continues against the Sharks Tuesday night at the Garden.

Meanwhile, Julien was asked Monday how different he feels his job is now with the salary cap becoming a bigger and bigger factor in the NHL roster-building process.

“You really like your players and you feel you have something going in the right direction and then all of sudden as a coach and even as a general manager, it’s hard to keep that team together because of that salary cap,” Julien said. “What you’ve built and done a good job at you’re not able to always keep together because of that. In the past, it didn’t matter. You found ways to keep your team together.”

Julien was also asked if today’s NHL economy makes it practically impossible for a team to become a dynasty, like the Canadiens of the late 70s, Islanders of the early 80s or Oilers of the late 80s.

“Well, it’s tough to have those dynasties,” Julien said. “You have to give credit to Chicago and L.A. who have won two Cups [each] there in a short span of time. I don’t know if we’ll see a team win five straight Stanley Cups again. If they do, it’ll be quite a feat.”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia
Matt Bartkowski

Matt Bartkowski

In the offseason, Peter Chiarelli said he felt the Bruins had nine NHL-caliber defensemen. A 10th, he would later say, was close in Zach Trotman. It was hard to disagree.

Then the B’€™s traded Johnny Boychuk. Then Kevan Miller dislocated his right shoulder in a fight Saturday night, leaving him out indefinitely.

You can bet that all the defensive depth you’€™ve heard about will be put to the test now.

The obvious replacement with Miller out of the lineup is Matt Bartkowski. The Bruins would take turns sitting guys to find ways to get him in the lineup last season before Dennis Seidenberg‘€™s knee injury gave him a full-time job. With a healthier group this season, Bartkowski has been limited to just one game.

After that, David Warsofsky is the only remaining blueliner from the summer’€™s advertised group not on the roster. The B’€™s had to put him on waivers in order to send him to Providence at the end of training camp, but nobody claimed him. In five AHL games this season, the 24-year-old Warsofsky has no points and a minus-5 rating.

The thing with both Bartkowski and Warsofsky is that they are both left shots, while Miller is a righty. The Bruins, as you’€™ve probably noticed by now, like to play with a lefty on the left and a righty on the right unless it’€™s a Zdeno Chara-Dennis Seidenberg (both lefties) type of pairing.

There have been other exceptions to the lefty-righty rule, as Torey Krug played a bit on the right side down the stretch last season and Seidenberg has played on the left when paired with Bartkowski. It’€™s worth noting that the Bartkowski-Seidenberg pairing has struggled when used in games dating back to last season before Seidenberg’€™s injury.

If the Bruins want to keep their defense the way it’€™s been, with Zdeno Chara and Dougie Hamilton on the top pairing and Seidenberg-McQuaid rounding out the top-4, they could look to Trotman, a 6-foot-3, 219-pound right-shooting defenseman to play alongside Krug. Trotman, who played a pair of games for Boston last season, has a pair of assists and a minus-4 rating thus far in five games for Providence.

After those guys, the Bruins have more young defensemen stewing in Providence. With no disrespect intended towards the others, Chris Casto was quite possibly the only impressive defensemen in August’€™s rookie tournament between prospects from the Bruins, Lightning, Panthers and Predators.

Chris Breen is a slightly older player (25 years old) signed in the offseason. Joe Morrow, the Penguins‘€™ first-round pick in the 2011 draft, is in his second season with Providence after being traded to the Stars for Brenden Morrow and then to the B’€™s in the Tyler Seguin trade.

Before the Boychuk trade, it was known that not all of these guys would be here, but the assumption wasn’€™t always that it would be Boychuk who was moved. Chiarelli hinted throughout the offseason that he might move a defenseman and then said close to definitively at the rookie tournament that he would.

Given that Torey Krug is a more experienced version of Warsofsky, it seemed Warsofsky could be a possibility to be moved. Same went for Bartkowski, who was fine for the Bruins last regular season before missing time with an illness early in the postseason and struggling against the Canadiens. Adam McQuaid needed to play games before a trade value could be established.

Remember, a big part of last season’s demise was that the team didn’t end up being able to patch up their back end with young blueliners as successfully as they thought they could. Those players are a season older and a season more experienced. Experience might be the most important factor in a young player’s development.

All that depth sounded nice because it didn’€™t seem set in stone that the Bruins would actually have to find out whether it really existed. The jury is still out on Boston’€™s young defensemen, and the Boychuk trade and Miller’€™s injury mean the team will start finding out on these guys soon enough.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILMINGTON — In the midst of a whirlwind week, Seth Griffith is just trying to soak everything in.

The 21-year-old, 5-foot-9 winger had the chance to skate on the first line of Milan Lucic and David Krejci on Monday. He was recalled Monday after scoring his second goal of the season in three games for AHL Providence on Sunday against Portland. Just two days earlier, he nearly scored against Montreal. He’s been up and down twice in the span of five days.

Griffith, along with Ryan Spooner, Matt Fraser and Craig Cunningham, is part of the Bruins’ great early-season experiment to try and find a replacement for Jarome Iginla on the top line. Saturday night in Buffalo, it was Simon Gagne slotted in with Lucic and Krejci. But on Monday in practice it was Griffith, who has nine shots in three games with Providence but only four in three games with Boston.

“It’s pretty crazy how much faster and stronger it is in the NHL,” Griffith said. “Coming from the AHL just [Sunday] night, you can tell there’s a huge difference so hopefully, I got a little confidence [Sunday] night, come back here and try and bear down on one and hopefully, I get one.

“It’s an adjustment coming from the AHL up here. There’s bigger, faster, stronger guys so just little things along the wall, puck protection skills like that go a long way. You learn a lot from them. It’s not everyday guys get to come in and work with guys like this. You learn a lot of things, just in drills, little tricks you can do in the corners, stuff along the wall. It helps a lot.”

Coach Claude Julien admitted Monday after practice that he is forced into a situation of playing a young player like Griffith at the NHL level because of a lack of veteran bodies due to salary cap restrictions. Griffith is trying to take advantage of that chance by watching and listening to Lucic and Krejci during practice.

“There’s tons of little things, puck protection and they work hard every shift,” said the 190-pound Griffith. “It just shows why they’re up here and why they succeed up here. I think everybody in training camp learned a lot from these guys and I know guys in Providence still talk about the work ethic up here. It just goes to show how hard-working the work ethic is in this organization.

“Being a smaller guy, I feel like you have to work on that every day. I felt better with every game I played. Hopefully, I can just keep improving from that and go from there.”

Griffith, who had two shots against Montreal last Thursday, is still looking for that first NHL goal. He could get that chance Tuesday night against San Jose, if Julien decides to play him on the first line.

“I tried shooting a lot more,” he said. “I had a couple of chances in Montreal and hopefully, I can just bury one soon. It’s kind of what you have to do. You can’t think too much or your nerves will get the best of you so I’m just trying to play my game and do my best.

“I think after I get one, I might settle down a little bit. Until then, I’ll definitely be nervous. I think that’s a good thing, keep me on my toes a little bit.”

Blog Author: 
Mike Petraglia

We’ve seen a video game version of Brad Marchand play guitar, and now we get to see real life Tuukka Rask play drums.

According to the Buffalo News, Rask and a few teammates went to a show at the Allentown music venue in Buffalo on Friday night while they were in town for Saturday night’s game against the Sabres, a 4-0 Bruins win.

Rask asked local band The Mustn’ts if he could play drums for a song, and they let him sit in for a cover of Phish’s “Back on the Train.”

Here’s video of the performance:

Blog Author: 
Scott McLaughlin

Bruins defenseman Kevan Miller is out indefinitely with a dislocated right shoulder, general manager Peter Chiarelli announced Monday. Miller suffered the injury in a fight with Buffalo’s Nicolas Deslaurier on Saturday night.