Landon Ferraro has picked up late shifts from David Pastrnak.</p>
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The Bruins sent center Joonas Kemppainen to Providence on Friday. He will play Friday night against Albany.

Joonas Kemppainen

Joonas Kemppainen

The Bruins sent center Joonas Kemppainen to Providence on Friday.

Kemppainen, a 27-year-old center who came to the NHL from Finland this offseason, has struggled in his first North American season. In 35 games for the Bruins, Kemppainen has one goal and two assists for three points. He has won 51.4 percent of his faceoffs but posted poor possession numbers. His Relative Corsi of -16.4 ranks 17th among 20 Bruins skaters with at least 20 games played this season.

Kemppainen was a healthy scratch in both of the Bruins’€™ post All-Star break contests leading up to his demotion.

Friday’s move leaves the Bruins with 22 players on their NHL roster, one shy of the maximum. Adam McQuaid figures to come off injured reserve soon, though he has yet to take contact as he works his way back from an upper-body injury. McQuaid practiced with the Bruins Friday after taking part in Thursday’s morning skate.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean
DJ Bean and Ken Laird discuss Thursday's 3-2 comeback, shootout win in Buffalo as the Bruins take hold of 3rd place in the Atlantic Division

[0:00:31] ... offer them what was it Spooner the second round pick her for Chris Stewart and probably ought to have now running back at this point but. Yes but her I have always liked the idea that ...
[0:04:27] ... closer to the trade deadline. We're getting it to division in the Eastern Conference that are it should try to I don't have a better. They're playoff Dendy. I don't Irish data weighed their play out ...
[0:06:33] ... better result there's not coming here. Good stuff final game with the Buffalo Sabres coming up on Saturday night and you know again a game that you they should win as you point out these are ...





The Bruins took a break from blowing third-period leads against bad teams by coming back against a bad team Thursday. Either way, two points is two points.

After allowing the game’€™s first goals, the Bruins came back to force overtime and eventually take a 3-2 shootout victory over the Sabres as they bounced back from Tuesday’€™s ugly overtime loss to the Maple Leafs.

The Bruins took a break from blowing third-period leads against bad teams by coming back against a bad team Thursday. Either way, two points is two points.

After allowing the game’€™s first goals, the Bruins came back to force overtime and eventually take a 3-2 shootout victory over the Sabres as they bounced back from Tuesday’€™s ugly overtime loss to the Maple Leafs.

Ryan Spooner, who scored his 11th goal of the season during regulation, scored the only goal of the shootout as Tuukka Rask stood tall against all three of Buffalo’€™s shooters. The victory moved the Bruins into sole possession of third place in the Atlantic Division, as they now trail only the Lightning and Panthers in the division.

The Bruins survived a Patrice Bergeron penalty in overtime that saw Zdeno Chara and Dennis Seidenberg play the entire two minutes of 4-on-3, with Seidenberg making a diving save on Ryan O’€™Reilly with Tuukka Rask recovering from a previous save.

Here are four more things we learned Thursday:

MARCHAND DOES IT HIMSELF

Brad Marchand‘€™s 23rd goal of the season will surely end up on his highlight reel. Marchand got the puck in the Bruins’€™ zone at the tail end of a Sabres power play and proceeded to wheel around and skate past four Buffalo players before sending a backhander past Chad Johnson.

Marchand now has eight goals in his last eight games, with last Tuesday’€™s loss to the Ducks the only game in that span in which he hasn’€™t scored.

FERRARO MOVES UP AGAIN

For the second straight game, Claude Julien moved Landon Ferraro up to the right wing of David Krejci‘€™s line in place of David Pastrnak late in the third period.

Pastrnak had a bit of a wonky night, with a mixup between the young forward and Kevan Miller resulting in a goal against. With the Bruins in the offensive zone in the first period, Pastrnak went hard after a loose puck but backed off when a pinching Miller wound up for a slap shot. They both ended up backing off the puck, allowing the Sabres to the take the puck the other way. Shortly after Brian Gionta hit the post, Evander Kane scored to give the Sabres a 1-0 lead. 

ERIKSSON RUNNING COLD

Pointing out when Loui Eriksson’€™s production has dipped is like pointing out when Patrice Bergeron‘€™s production has dipped: points are only part of the reason they’€™re star players.

Still, this has been a very good offensive season for the three-zone player and Eriksson hasn’€™t gone quiet often. With no points on Thursday, however, he now has just one point (an assist) over his last six games. Eriksson has not score a goal in nine games.

POWER PLAY, TOO

In going 0-for-4 on the power play, the Bruins have just two power play goals to show for their last nine games, a span in which they’€™ve been 2-for-27 on the man advantage.

The Bruins had a power play in overtime as a result of a slashing penalty against Kane, but failed to convert. Patrice Bergeron nearly but the game away during the man advantage but was robbed by Johnson.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

The Bruins activated goaltender Jonas Gustavsson from injured reserve and returned Malcolm Subban to Providence on Thursday. Gustavsson is expected to back up Tuukka Rask Thursday night against the Sabres.

The Bruins activated goaltender Jonas Gustavsson from injured reserve and returned Malcolm Subban to Providence on Thursday. Gustavsson is expected to back up Tuukka Rask Thursday night against the Sabres.

Gustavsson had to leave last Tuesday’€™s game against the Ducks after one period and go to Mass General hospital, where he stayed overnight due to an elevated heart rate. He was released from the hospital the next day but has been on IR since the B’€™s returned from the All-Star break.

Subban did not play in any games during his callup, backing up Rask on Tuesday.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILMINGTON — The Bruins are currently in playoff standing in a bad division. Even with all their flaws, they shouldn’€™t be particularly scared of anyone in the Eastern Conference outside of Washington. Despite that, they’€™re not close to being a Stanley Cup contender.

WILMINGTON — The Bruins are currently in playoff standing in a bad division. Even with all their flaws, they shouldn’€™t be particularly scared of anyone in the Eastern Conference outside of Washington. Despite that, they’€™re not close to being a Stanley Cup contender.

Things get complicated when considering that the Bruins could very well end up trading one of their better players in Loui Eriksson, which could bump them out of being a playoff team altogether. That could trigger a bigger rebuild, which the team would have to hope wouldn’€™t take up too much of players like 29-year-old David Krejci‘€™s prime years.

Krejci, who has centered Eriksson and enjoyed one of the best seasons of his career, wants the team to re-sign the veteran wing. He does not want the team to move big pieces and fall out of the playoff picture.

“You don’€™t want that, especially after last year, but I thought they did a good job of bringing guys. We’€™re still a playoff team,” Krejci said. “You don’€™t to be sitting with many games and just going through the motions, out of the playoffs. We still have a playoff team, and in the playoffs, you never know.”

Eriksson has been Krejci’€™s most common linemate this season, as the two have been together for 465:31 of Krejci’€™s 589:14 of 5-on-5 time. The versatile winger is in the final year of his contract and the team is willing to trade the player if they feel there isn’€™t enough common ground to eventually extend him. Krejci, who is in the first year of a six-year contract, doesn’€™t want that to happen.

“It’€™s kind of out of my [hands], but I really love playing with him,” Krejci said. “It would be nice, but you kind of have to dig deep with where our management really wants to go in the next few years because Loui obviously isn’€™t looking for a one-year deal, right? I’€™m sure Loui would like to stay –€” I don’€™t want to speak for him – but I would love for him to stick around.”

Regardless of what the Bruins do, Krejci wants his prime years to be spent with the Bruins contending.

“This NHL right now, there’€™s so many young guys,” Krejci said. “Even if you get some new guys –€” if they’€™re the right guys, we should still be a playoff team.”

There isn’t an easy solution for the Bruins. Trading guys like Eriksson might make it a couple of years before they’re good again, though they would have more candidates to replace key players should they be moved via trade. If they do more of a soft rebuild, as this past offseason indicated, they might not get much better than what they are now.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean