Bruins rookie defenseman Johnny Boychuk, who becomes a Category 6 unrestricted free agent because he has less than 80 games of service time in the NHL but is also older than age 26, said on Tuesday morning that his first priority is to re-sign with the Bruins this summer. Boychuk said that his agents, Gerry Johannson and Steve Kotlowitz, have not begun discussions with general manager Peter Chiarelli and the Bruins yet but he hopes that the process can get going after a short vacation and return to Edmonton for the summer.

 

The Bruins are breaking down and heading out for the summer at TD Garden on Tuesday morning and questions abound for the plethora of restricted and unrestricted free agents that dot the roster. One of the most prominent, unrestricted free agent Dennis Seidenberg, who was acquired by general manager Peter Chiarelli at the trade deadline in March, said Tuesday morning that his agent has been in contact with Chiarelli and he hopes that a deal will be worked out soon as to avoid free agency when it begins in July.

 

Now come the questions.

Does Peter Chiarelli fire Claude Julien on Tuesday? Do Jeremy and Charlie Jacobs decide to axe Chiarelli before the draft? What do you do about Tim Thomas?



DAN ROWINSKI

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Bruins vice president Cam Neely called in to The Big Show on Monday afternoon to to talk about the Bruins' collapse in the Eastern Conference semifinals and discuss the future of the club with offseason personnel decisions looming. "We’re going to look top to bottom," Neely said. "Obviously, when you don’t win the last game of the hockey season, you have to improve your club, so we’re looking at all ways at doing what we need to do to improve the club."

 

After a weekend to let the biggest playoff collapse in Bruins history sink in, we’re ready to take a look at the Bruins’ season in review, a year that started with high hopes of a potential dominant



DAN ROWINSKI

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That is a fitting end to one of the most frustrating seasons in the history of the Boston Bruins.



DAN ROWINSKI

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GRAIG WOODBURN

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Simon Gagne, the hero of Game 7 and of the series for the Flyers, said after Philadelphia's 4-3 win in Game 7 that nerves may have played a role in the too many men on the ice penalty that led to the series-deciding goal.

 

The too-many-men penalty that the Bruins took at 11:10 of the third period occurred when center Marc Savard had signaled for a change with his stick up heading toward the bench and then passed the bench to continue on the back-check. Center Vladimir Sobotka jumped on the ice and took a few steps before circling around and coming back to the bench, but at that point the referees had called the penalty. Simon Gagne scored for the Flyers on the power play 1:42 later for the series-deciding goal.

 

Simon Gagne scored a power play goal with 7:08 remaining in the third period and the Flyers erased a 3-0 first period deficit and rallied to shock the Bruins, 4-3, in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals at TD Garden. The goal came while the Bruins were trying to kill a penalty for too many men on the ice. And like in 1979 against Montreal, the goal came in the third period of Game 7 and helped eliminate the Bruins from the playoffs.