David Krejci will be 35 when his contract expires. (Getty Images)The Bruins backed up the Brink’s truck for David Krejci. Why?



According to a league source, the Bruins and David Krejci have agreed to a six-year, $43.5 million contract.

According to a league source, the Bruins and David Krejci have agreed to a six-year, $43.5 million contract.

Krejci, 28, will carry a $7.25 million cap hit throughout the duration of the deal, which begins in the 2015-16 season. His salary breakdown will be $7.25 million for the first two years of the deal, $7.5 million for the next two and $7 million for the final two.

The contract will make Krejci the highest-paid player on the team cap-figure-wise when the pact begins in the 2015-16 season. Sitting behind him are Tuukka Rask ($7 million cap hit), Zdeno Chara ($6.916 million) and Patrice Bergeron ($6.5 million)

Krejci is entering the final year of a three-year, $15.75 million contract that he signed in December of 2011. His last contract was signed during a contract year before what would have been restricted free agency. In getting this contract wrapped up now, Krejci joins the likes of Chara and Bergeron (twice) as key unrestricted-free-agents-to-be that Chiarelli got signed before their contract years.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILIMINGTON –€” Earlier in Adam McQuaid’€™s NHL career, the book on him fairly apparent: He was a tough-as-nails right shot defensemen whose responsible style made him a good fit on a third pairing, but he couldn’€™t be counted on for 82 games. That, and he could fight like a maniac.

McQuaid suffered smaller injuries here and there as he missed two playoff games in Boston’€™s 2011 Cup run, 10 games in 2011-12 (and then all seven playoff games with a concussion), then missed 16 games in the lockout-shortened 2013 season.

Last season, however, was a different animal. A quad injury hindered him through multiple attempts to return to the lineup, and when all was said and done McQuaid got into only 30 games, the last of which was Jan. 19. When it became clear that the quad had ended his season, the decision was made for him to get ankle surgery to heal another issue that had been bothering him.

Now, with the Bruins and other local skaters taking the ice in preparation for the season, McQuaid is at full health and trying to find his feet again. The biggest physical hurdle remaining for him is conditioning, as it’€™s tough to be in optimal game shape when you’€™ve been off the ice for seven-plus months.

“Just getting strength and endurance,”€ McQuaid said of where he stands in his comeback. “€œIt’s been a bit of a layoff, so getting back into situations, making plays and reading plays and understanding your position on the ice, which probably everyone will have a bit of an adjustment but it’ll be a little more for me. So just need to make those areas that I focus on.”

Injuries aside, McQuaid’€™s biggest problem might be that he is returning to a Bruins defensive picture that is much different than the one that he left. When McQuaid initially suffered his injury on Nov. 13, he was locked in as Boston’€™s third-pairing right defenseman, playing regular minutes alongside Torey Krug.

When he went out, Matt Bartkowski got more NHL experience, while Kevan Miller emerged in McQuaid’€™s spot on the third pair. Now, the 27-year-old McQuaid is just one of nine NHL blue liners trying to get on the ice for the B’€™s.

“I guess it’s a good situation to have for the team,”€ McQuaid said. “€œLuckily, we’ve put ourselves in this position as an organization. I think everyone, just same old saying: control what you can control. I want to come out and give out my best effort. Hopefully that’s enough. We’ll see how things go. Just focus on your job and the other decisions will be left to the people that make those decisions.”

When Miller initially established himself and then signed a team-friendly two-year contract with an annual cap hit of just $800,000, it looked like McQuaid could become expendable. Trading McQuaid now would be unwise for the Bruins, however, as the more logical move would be to let McQuaid re-establish himself with an extended stretch of healthy playing time and then re-assess where the team’€™s back end stands.

“You just focus on your job and at the end of the day, you don’t make those decisions,” McQuaid said. “Other people do. You try to put yourself in the best position to succeed and that’s really all you can do.”

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILMINGTON –€” Milan Lucic and Zdeno Chara were the two notable additions to the group at Wednesday’€™s semi-formal (called informal, but super-organized) practice at Ristuccia Arena.

WILMINTON –€” Milan Lucic and Zdeno Chara were the two notable additions to the group at Wednesday’€™s semi-formal (called informal, but super-organized) practice at Ristuccia Arena. Lucic, who is coming off wrist surgery, skated by himself beforehand and did not join the others, while Chara took part in the full skate.

After the session, both Adam McQuaid and Chris Kelly briefed the media on their respective injury situations. McQuaid, who is coming off ankle surgery and a quad injury, is at full health but is a bit behind on his conditioning. He hopes to be in playing shape during training camp.

Kelly, meanwhile, was instructed to not do any sort of exercise for six weeks following surgery to repair a herniated disc in his back. Since then, he has been working out and skating plenty. Kelly said he now feels no limitations.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

WILMINGTON — The Bruins began their informal captains practices Tuesday, and there was a strong turnout from current Bruins, future Boston hopefuls, ex-Bruins and plain old local NHLers.

First-round pick David Pastrak could push for an NHL job this season. (Getty Images)WILMINGTON —- In years past, Bruins prospects who have yet to turn pro have not participated in captains practice, instead waiting until rookie camp to get on the ice with teammates in the fall.



WILMINGTON — The Bruins began their informal captains practices Tuesday, and there was a strong turnout from current Bruins, future Boston hopefuls, ex-Bruins and plain old local NHLers.

Among the current Bruins on the ice were Dennis Seidenberg, Adam McQuaid and Chris Kelly, all three of whom were off the ice last postseason when the B’s made an early exit from the playoffs at the hands of the Canadiens. Seidenberg has long recovered from his torn ACL (he would have been available in the Eastern Conference finals had the B’s made it there), while Kelly is coming off back surgery and McQuaid is returning from quad and ankle injuries.

Other Bruins on the ice included Patrice Bergeron, Tuukka Rask, Loui Eriksson and Daniel Paille. Among the Providence Bruins present were Zach Trotman, Justin Florek, Bobby Robins, Tommy Cross and David Warsofsky. One surprising face to see was that of 2014 first-round pick David Pastrnak. In the past, rookie camp invitees have not participated in captains practices.

The biggest name of the former Bruins present was Shawn Thornton, but he definitely wasn’t the biggest former Bruin in attendance. That distinction went to Hal Gill. Boston native and current Coyote Keith Yandle was also on the ice.

The informal practices, which are closed to the public, are expected to continue throughout the week. Rookie camp begins on Sept. 11, while training camp practices begin on Sept. 19.

For more Bruins news, visit weei.com/bruins.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean

There’s no two ways about it: This NHL 15 commercial, starring Patrice Bergeron, is the weirdest.

Bergeron, who was voted the cover athlete of the EA Sports video game, beat out P.K. Subban to get on the cover. That means more bright lights for the quiet and humble center, and, apparently, poetry. This is a far cry from Bergeron’s license plate commercial from when he was a rookie in 2003-04.

As I’m posting this, I remember that GIFs exist. This is going to be interesting.

Blog Author: 
DJ Bean